Helen Reviews

  • Apr 18, 2019

    The film could have been better, but what the so-called critics miss is that this is a film about depression, so it is supposed to be "slow" and "relentless." I don't think those critics have ever tried looking at things from another person's perspective. I loved this quote from the film, in which Helen (Ashley Judd) emphasizes to a frustrated student the importance of silence in music: "Hold on to time. Suspension. Silence. That's where you'll find what you're looking for. In the distance between things."

    The film could have been better, but what the so-called critics miss is that this is a film about depression, so it is supposed to be "slow" and "relentless." I don't think those critics have ever tried looking at things from another person's perspective. I loved this quote from the film, in which Helen (Ashley Judd) emphasizes to a frustrated student the importance of silence in music: "Hold on to time. Suspension. Silence. That's where you'll find what you're looking for. In the distance between things."

  • May 04, 2015

    An okay story but with a very dry and lacklustre execution. Some fine performances here and there, but still uninspiring and cliched overall, closer to a LifeTime TV movie of the week than anything.

    An okay story but with a very dry and lacklustre execution. Some fine performances here and there, but still uninspiring and cliched overall, closer to a LifeTime TV movie of the week than anything.

  • Dec 15, 2014

    An honest and difficult portrayal of the struggle on all sides of depression.

    An honest and difficult portrayal of the struggle on all sides of depression.

  • Oct 16, 2014

    As a sufferer of mental illness, I can deeply relate to these characters. For those who don't suffer or have someone in their life who does, they will not likely enjoy this movie.

    As a sufferer of mental illness, I can deeply relate to these characters. For those who don't suffer or have someone in their life who does, they will not likely enjoy this movie.

  • Aug 11, 2014

    Não gostei da forma que a atriz retrata a depressão, parece muito falsa pelo teor do drama, devia ser algo mais parado.

    Não gostei da forma que a atriz retrata a depressão, parece muito falsa pelo teor do drama, devia ser algo mais parado.

  • Apr 20, 2014

    I think the best part about this movie is the mostly accurate portrayal of major depression. There is nothing that anyone else can do about it and it requires medical attention. The rest of the movie was pretty good.

    I think the best part about this movie is the mostly accurate portrayal of major depression. There is nothing that anyone else can do about it and it requires medical attention. The rest of the movie was pretty good.

  • Jan 20, 2014

    This movie could have been much better, it drags along to the point one almost is bored, just waiting for something to happen. When things do finally happen, such as the actual breakdown scenes, the breakdown of Helen, one finally hopes for more storyline, more substance. It just never comes. The movie is 'agonizingly slow'. as another person said here. Goran Visnjic was excellent as the husband who bears the burden of his wife's illness. Ashley Judd just barely makes it in portraying a woman with serious illness. I call it poor direction by Sandra Bettelbeck.

    This movie could have been much better, it drags along to the point one almost is bored, just waiting for something to happen. When things do finally happen, such as the actual breakdown scenes, the breakdown of Helen, one finally hopes for more storyline, more substance. It just never comes. The movie is 'agonizingly slow'. as another person said here. Goran Visnjic was excellent as the husband who bears the burden of his wife's illness. Ashley Judd just barely makes it in portraying a woman with serious illness. I call it poor direction by Sandra Bettelbeck.

  • Aug 11, 2013

    Boring. Depressing. Not worth watching.

    Boring. Depressing. Not worth watching.

  • Cynthia S Super Reviewer
    Aug 10, 2013

    A very depressing movie about deep depression, as expected. These kinds of movies are never fun to watch....Ashley Judd did a very convincing job.

    A very depressing movie about deep depression, as expected. These kinds of movies are never fun to watch....Ashley Judd did a very convincing job.

  • Apr 26, 2013

    Helen (Sandra Nettlebeck, 2009) Ashley Judd is singularly excellent at playing people who are about to break down, in the process of breaking down, or have just broken down. I'm not sure what, if anything, that says about Ms. Judd's personal life, but it does make many of her performances schadenfreude-style treats when consumed on the big screen. And the first thirty-odd minutes of Sandra Nettlebeck's Helen are described perfectly by this. Unfortunately, the movie runs two hours. Plot: Helen (Judd) and David (ER's Goran Visnjic) are a seemingly happy couple whose life couldn't be better-that is, until Helen begins changing. It's not much of a spoiler to tell you that she's sliding into depression (like I said, this stage of the film is its first quarter, give or take). And we're not talking rainy-day blues here, we're talking crippling, life-threatening depression. She eventually hits bottom and deserts her family-and her doctor-to bond with Mathilde (Lie with Me's Lauren Lee Smith), a similarly-affected former student of hers, while David tries to figure out what went wrong and how to make it better. It's impossible to get into the meat of why the last three-quarters of the movie don't work without what some may consider spoilers, though they have to do with the experience of depression rather than things specific to the film, so I will throw in a spoiler alert here and let the reader beware. The problem is that "what went wrong" is, as will be instantly recognizable by anyone who has lived through this kind of depression or lived with someone who has lived through this kind of depression, the wrong question entirely to be asking. I have no doubt that was Nettlebeck's point; the problem is that if her intention was to portray the ineffectual nature of David's quest leading to almost causing his own breakdown, she perhaps did it too well, as watching it is almost as frustrating as living it. One review I read of the film recently said this is a lesson as much as it is a movie. Indeed. And the didactic nature is liable to grate on anyone who already knows the answer. Still, Ashley Judd's performance in the first part of this movie does make this worth watching, though I think you'd be forgiven for deciding to turn it off halfway through. **

    Helen (Sandra Nettlebeck, 2009) Ashley Judd is singularly excellent at playing people who are about to break down, in the process of breaking down, or have just broken down. I'm not sure what, if anything, that says about Ms. Judd's personal life, but it does make many of her performances schadenfreude-style treats when consumed on the big screen. And the first thirty-odd minutes of Sandra Nettlebeck's Helen are described perfectly by this. Unfortunately, the movie runs two hours. Plot: Helen (Judd) and David (ER's Goran Visnjic) are a seemingly happy couple whose life couldn't be better-that is, until Helen begins changing. It's not much of a spoiler to tell you that she's sliding into depression (like I said, this stage of the film is its first quarter, give or take). And we're not talking rainy-day blues here, we're talking crippling, life-threatening depression. She eventually hits bottom and deserts her family-and her doctor-to bond with Mathilde (Lie with Me's Lauren Lee Smith), a similarly-affected former student of hers, while David tries to figure out what went wrong and how to make it better. It's impossible to get into the meat of why the last three-quarters of the movie don't work without what some may consider spoilers, though they have to do with the experience of depression rather than things specific to the film, so I will throw in a spoiler alert here and let the reader beware. The problem is that "what went wrong" is, as will be instantly recognizable by anyone who has lived through this kind of depression or lived with someone who has lived through this kind of depression, the wrong question entirely to be asking. I have no doubt that was Nettlebeck's point; the problem is that if her intention was to portray the ineffectual nature of David's quest leading to almost causing his own breakdown, she perhaps did it too well, as watching it is almost as frustrating as living it. One review I read of the film recently said this is a lesson as much as it is a movie. Indeed. And the didactic nature is liable to grate on anyone who already knows the answer. Still, Ashley Judd's performance in the first part of this movie does make this worth watching, though I think you'd be forgiven for deciding to turn it off halfway through. **