The Horse Boy - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

The Horse Boy Reviews

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December 25, 2012
I can't find the words that can accurately describe this documentary story. Mad and unbelievable, but also, so moving.
December 2, 2012
Two extremely annoying parents deal with their son's autism in the most extreme way possible. The film shirks all standard explanation and timelines in favor of what the filmmakers probably feel is a more emotionally true approach to the material. They can feel it, but when you don't build any connection with the characters, emotional truth is elusive.
½ June 14, 2012
a very inspiring transformation, but the film willows half its runtime explaining itself.
April 29, 2012
A family's trek to Mongolia to find a way to help their autistic son. Inspiring and raises profound questions.
½ April 5, 2012
A tough movie to watch especially if you dont have children, while there is a sensitivity given to the subject of autism, the movie is ultimately one boring scene after another.
½ April 1, 2012
I hated this movie. It was stupid and pointless.
½ January 23, 2012
Oh just cried 8 times. So unbelievable and beautiful!
½ January 13, 2012
I want to believe, that it is a very true, authentic story here. And I almost believe in "that kind of" healing here. But I don't know, if it's the whole story, but also I don't see the point, why authors would decide to make a fake movie. So..
½ August 15, 2011
Incredibly amazing story.
July 3, 2011
Definitely watch this if you have any interest in autism whatsoever. A really good example of awesome parenting.
April 26, 2011
We all know autistic/mentally ill kids can develop special bonds with animals so no surprises here. You just cant tell if if the trip actually helped the boy or not tho. With some beautiful shots of Mongolia. At Hulu.
½ April 26, 2011
Couldn't flaw it. A great depiction of what life is like for an autistic child and the parents. Follows an American couple with an autistic child. They go on a journey through Mongolia visiting various healers to attempt to cure some of the symptons. Great. A must see for everyone ! Oh, and it's based on a true story
April 2, 2011
Excelente documental. Se los recomiendo, sobre todo a los que son padres.
½ March 28, 2011
My facebook entries are usually fluff, but this film has us rethinking some pretty deep stuff. It is about the parents of an autistic child who take him to see shamans in Mongolia. At first it seems to portray only the desperate acts of desperate parents, but then...Jim and I are still trying to wrap our heads around the last visit with the shaman of the "reindeer people." There are obviously people in this world who have a genuine sixth or maybe seventh sense.
½ January 16, 2011
Another great recommendation from my friend, Christine! This is a wonderful documentary about one couple that travelled half way around the world in order to find help for their autistic son. ‚(TM)•
December 8, 2010
This documentary really opened my eyes to the challenges faced by parents of children with autism and other disorders. Made me think of that saying by Regina Brett: If we all threw our problems in a pile and saw everyone else's, we'd grab ours back.

I especially enjoyed the bits with "the real" Temple Grandin, having seen the outstanding film about her life, starring Clare Danes.
November 12, 2010
Beautiful, moving, thought-provoking documentary about an extraordinary journey, spiritually, emotionally and geographically. For once, I truly preferred the movie to the book (in which the narrator comes across as a bit self-indulgent and often irritating) because it's so much more honest and direct. The film also offers a fair amount of the mother's perspective whereas in the book none of her thoughts/worries/personality traits really shine through. The mutually loving, tactile relationship between the parents and their autistic son Rowan as seen on camera is quite overwhelming and moved me to tears many times, whereas in the book it's a lot of talk about unconditional love but whilst reading I didn't sympathise with the author as much emotionally. The spontaneous quips on camera are also loads funnier than the slightly contrived jokes in the book ("all autistic parents eat Rain Man biscuits" etc). I highly recommend the film over the book!
October 25, 2010
This is the story of how one family found a gateway into understanding their son's autism. Rowan requires constant supervision. Their only son suffers uncontrollable and unpredictable tantrums and chronic incontinence. His parents try to soothe him but his eyes look vacant, and their touch can‚(TM)t reach him. By chance, they discovered an interesting connection between Rowan and horses. It is uplifting and amazing to see how the parents put everything in their lives on hold and journeyed to Ulaanbaatar, and took Rowan to the vast Mongolian landscapes where Shamanism is the primary religion and a common practice of healing in this remarkable true story.
If I had seen this before I was a parent, it probably wouldn‚(TM)t have been this profound. Now, after viewing this hopeful tale, I look at my son and I had to ask myself‚?Could I ever have that kind of patience?‚?Could I deal with this, day by day?
Did they succeed in healing their son or did it end in despair? Got to see it for yourself.
October 25, 2010
This is the story of how one family found a gateway into understanding their son's autism. Rowan requires constant supervision. Their only son suffers uncontrollable and unpredictable tantrums and chronic incontinence. His parents try to soothe him but his eyes look vacant, and their touch can't reach him. By chance, they discovered an interesting connection between Rowan and horses. It is uplifting and amazing to see how the parents put everything in their lives on hold and journeyed to Ulaanbaatar, and took Rowan to the vast Mongolian landscapes where Shamanism is the primary religion and a common practice of healing in this remarkable true story.
If I had seen this before I was a parent, it probably wouldn't have been this profound. Now, after viewing this hopeful tale, I look at my son and I had to ask myself"Could I ever have that kind of patience?"Could I deal with this, day by day?
Did they succeed in healing their son or did it end in despair? Got to see it for yourself.
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