Liverpool (2008)



Critic Consensus: No consensus yet.

Liverpool Photos

Movie Info

The emotional wreckage left by one lonely man and his endless wandering is chronicled in this low-key drama from Argentinean filmmaker Lisandro Alonso. Farrel (Juan Fernandez) is a merchant sailor who has spent nearly all his adult life drifting from one job in one port to another. Farrel has never stayed in one place long enough to make many friends, and for all his freedom he's found little joy or contentment in his rootless existence. Farrel arrives in Ushuaia, a seaside city that's the closest thing he has to a home, and pays an unannounced visit to Trujillo (Nieves Cabrera), a longtime friend of his family. When Farrel went off to sea, Trujillo ended up looking after his daughter, Analia (Giselle Irrazabal), after the girl's mother passed on. Trujillo feels a deep contempt for Farrel because of his failure to care for his own child, and while teenage Analia harbors her own resentments, a childhood without parental love or support has turned her into a young woman who has turned all her emotions in on herself. Liverpool was screened as part of the Directors' Fortnight competition at the 2008 Cannes Film Festival. ~ Mark Deming, Rovi
Art House & International , Drama
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Critic Reviews for Liverpool

All Critics (13) | Top Critics (7)

In his fourth feature, Alonso trusts fully in the power of the camera to communicate emotions and connections with a stunning grace and total confidence.

Full Review… | March 4, 2010
Los Angeles Times
Top Critic

Modest rewards await those willing to be patient with Lisandro Alonso's austere drama.

Full Review… | September 4, 2009
New York Daily News
Top Critic

Although it has its visual pleasures, and there's plenty to admire about his compositions, the journey in Liverpool seems comparatively slight.

September 3, 2009
New York Times
Top Critic

The imagery is meticulous, the pacing carefully measured, and the mood generally melancholy and enigmatic. Whether the film adds up to more than the some of its parts is moot; Alonso certainly seems keen not to give away any superflous information.

Full Review… | September 2, 2009
Time Out
Top Critic

Liverpool opens with a big blast of neo surf, and coasts on that energy for the movie's 84 minutes, ending with a shot of corresponding impact.

Full Review… | September 1, 2009
Village Voice
Top Critic

... you should find that this one chops the wood.

Full Review… | December 19, 2012
Ozus' World Movie Reviews

Audience Reviews for Liverpool

Alonso becomes so art house in his treatment that he forgets that films are supposed to be entertaining.

John Ballantine
John Ballantine

Super Reviewer

As anybody who spends an unhealthy amount of time around here can attest to, I generally don't mind if a movie has a leisurely pace. But "Liverpool" is the one such movie that tests my patience with pointless scenes so drawn out, I was afraid my DVD player was skipping in a couple of places. As if. Along these same lines, there is nothing wrong with a filmmaker using minimal dialogue, thus allowing images to either tell a person's story or set up a mystery behind a character's actions. The only problem is that there is so little of either, here. With one exception, the only thing you will ever need to know about Ferral(Juan Fernandez) comes remarkably early when he asks his captain if he can get some time off to see if his mother is still alive the next time they put ashore in Ushuaia, Argentina, despite the wintry weather. And even in trying to be subtle with the movie's ending, "Liverpool" also manages to be manipulative at the same time.

Walter M.
Walter M.

Super Reviewer


Objects have any number of unique symbolic attributes, but their meanings become increasingly and intriguingly malleable through Alonso's patient, long-take purview.

Lee Mayo
Lee Mayo

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