Che: Part One (The Argentine) (2009)

TOMATOMETER

AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: Though lengthy and at times plodding, Soderbergh's vision and Benicio Del Toro's understated performance ensure that Che always fascinates.

Che: Part One (The Argentine) Videos

Che: Part One (The Argentine) Photos

Movie Info

Nearly 40 years after Che Guevara's execution in Bolivia, director Steven Soderbergh retraces the life of the iconic Cuban revolutionary in this nearly four-and-a-half-hour saga. Part 1 begins on November 26, 1956, as Fidel Castro (Demián Bichir) sails into Cuban waters with 80 rebels in tow. Among those rebels is Argentine doctor Ernesto "Che" Guevara (Benicio Del Toro), a man who shares Castro's dream of overthrowing corrupt dictator Fulgencio Batista. As the struggle gets under way, Guevara proves an indispensable part of the revolution due to his firm grasp on the concepts of guerilla warfare. Guevara is heartily embraced by both his comrades and the Cuban people, and quickly rises through the ranks to become first a commander, and ultimately a revolutionary hero. Part 2 of the saga begins with Guevara at the absolute peak of his fame and power. Disappearing suddenly, Guevara subsequently resurfaces in Bolivia to organize a modest group of Cuban comrades and Bolivian recruits in preparation for the Latin American Revolution. But while the Bolivian campaign would ultimately fail, the tenacity, sacrifice, and idealism displayed by Guevara during this period would make him a symbol of heroism to followers around the world. Part 1 and Part 2 were screened together as Che at the 2008 Cannes Film Festival, and also received a limited theatrical release under that same title in U.S. theaters later that same year.
Rating:
R (for some violence)
Genre:
Art House & International , Drama
Directed By:
Written By:
In Theaters:
 wide
On DVD:
Runtime:
Studio:
IFC Films

Cast

Benicio Del Toro
as Ernesto Che Guevara
Rodrigo Santoro
as Raul Castro
Joaquim de Almeida
as President René Barrientos
Lou Diamond Phillips
as Mario Monje
Santiago Cabrera
as Camillo Cienfuegos
Jorge Minguez
as Joaquin
Edgar Ramirez
as Ciro Redondo
Victor Rasuk
as Rogelio Acevedo
Armando Riesco
as Benigno
Unax Ugalde
as Little Cowboy
Yul Vázquez
as Alejandro Ramirez
Carlos Bardem
as Moises Guevara
Eduard Fernández
as Ciro Algaranaz
Demian Bichir
as Fidel Castro
Marc-Andre Grondin
as Regis Debray
Kahlil Mendez
as Urbano
Jordi Molla
as Capt. Vargas
Matt Damon
as Guest
Julia Ormond
as Lisa Howard
Gastón Pauls
as Ciros Bustos
Elvira Mínguez
as Celia Sanchez
Oscar Isaac
as Interpreter
Show More Cast

Critic Reviews for Che: Part One (The Argentine)

All Critics (134) | Top Critics (30)

No excerpt available.

Full Review… | November 17, 2011
Time Out
Top Critic

No excerpt available.

Full Review… | September 23, 2011
Washington Post
Top Critic

Soderbergh has made two almost perfect war films, more like the Rings Trilogy than The Green Berets.

Full Review… | October 1, 2009
MovieTime, ABC Radio National
Top Critic

There is precious little in these movies to fill out our understanding of what it was that made Che a rebel, a leader of men, and the repository of the romantic dreams of several generations of armchair revolutionaries

Full Review… | March 6, 2009
Film.com
Top Critic

A potentially great title-role performance by Benicio Del Toro, which won him the best actor award at Cannes, is buried beneath Soderbergh's stylistic tics and a defiant lack of dramatic tension.

Full Review… | February 20, 2009
Toronto Star
Top Critic

In releasing this reverent, meticulous, fascinating but flaccid history in two lengthy parts, Soderbergh committed perhaps the greatest sin of all. He made Che boring.

Full Review… | February 18, 2009
Orlando Sentinel
Top Critic

Audience Reviews for Che: Part One (The Argentine)

Soderbergh's political biography about Che Guevara and his involvement in the Cuban Revolution is expertly directed and even feels like a documentary, but is also frustrating as it shows him as a nearly flawless hero and avoids any of the controversies surrounding his character.

Carlos Magalhães
Carlos Magalhães

Super Reviewer

A sprawling, epic look at the life of Che Guevara through the lense of Steven Soderbergh. Del Toro is brilliant in the lead.

Graham Jones
Graham Jones

Super Reviewer

½

I should have hated this film. I feel like the legend of Che has become so distorted & romanticized, that whatever your cause, you can invoke the name of Che to further it. On top of this, every college student with access to a Hot Topic has donned a shirt with the figure's face on it, without the benefit of knowing the context of the original movement. The last thing I needed was further ambiguity. However, Soderbergh's film seems to revel in this ambiguity. Che was a zealous ideologue, ardent supporter of justice (no matter how perverse his idea of justice became), and a romantic. I feel as though Soderbergh captures this very well and made really the only film you could make about such an enigmatic figure. One devoid of understanding. Were Soderbergh to take a stance and really dive into what drove Che, he would be making a judgement. Whether he would decide that Che's pursuits were righteous, or a parade a violence driven by delusion, Soderbergh would have to judge his character. And how do you do that when he means so many things to so many different types of people? I think by abandoning the conventional narrative, and showing vignettes of his life rather than presenting it chronologically, Soderbergh continues to let the audience decide. Sure, I understand the criticism that by not showing Che commit the violent acts himself in a way absolves him of the crimes & creates in essence, a fairly tale. Yet, I think Che's pursuits were of a very macabre fairy tale. Will I be watching this film every weekend? No way. Do I think Soderbergh could have tightened up the film overall and cut some of the fat? Absolutely. None the less, I think Soderbergh made the only film that could be made about this infamous revolutionary. It's terrifically filmed, impeccably acted, & I think Soderbergh deserves a lot of credit for bringing this controversial life to the big screen.

Reid Volk
Reid Volk

Super Reviewer

Discussion Forum

Discuss Che: Part One (The Argentine) on our Movie forum!

News & Features