35 Up (1991)

35 Up (1991)

TOMATOMETER

AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: No consensus yet.

35 Up Photos

Movie Info

In 1963, director Michael Apted and then-partner Paul Almond chronicled the lives of 14 seven-year-olds for British television; they returned to the same group at intervals of seven years for updates, of which this is the fifth. It's possible to watch this film without having seen the other chapters (28 Up and 42 Up are the only other installments in circulation), because Apted offers thumbnail flashbacks with each interview. Several of the original subjects declined to be filmed for 35 Up (the film acknowledges them with reference to their most recent appearance in the series), and several others express ambivalence about participating. Two trios of friends from the original film -- John, Andrew, and Charles, and Jackie, Lynn, and Sue -- are interviewed collectively; the women seem to be still close, but it's not clear if the men are. Most of the subjects are married and raising children (and most have moved from London to the suburbs or the country); there are a few divorces, and one woman has chosen to be a single parent. The film saves its most fascinating figure, Neil, for last. In 28 Up, he was a university dropout, living a nomadic existence on the coast of Scotland. In the present film, he has moved to the Shetland Islands, where he's involved in local theater and taking medications for his psychological illness.
Rating:
NR
Genre:
Documentary , Special Interest , Television
Directed By:
Written By:
In Theaters:
 wide
On DVD:
Runtime:
Studio:
Granada Television Productions

Cast

Critic Reviews for 35 Up

All Critics (17) | Top Critics (5)

There's certainly plenty of food for thought here, but most of it is served raw rather than cooked -- most of the significance of the development of faces, physiques, aspirations, and attitudes over three decades is left to the subjects themselves.

Full Review… | August 14, 2012
Chicago Reader
Top Critic

No excerpt available.

Full Review… | September 25, 2005
AV Club
Top Critic

[35 Up] finds this series growing increasingly rueful with age.

May 20, 2003
New York Times
Top Critic

The film's realism is as ruthless as it is low-key. It's impossible not to look at the 35-year-old woman and mourn the loss of the 7-year-old girl.

Full Review… | December 31, 1999
Washington Post
Top Critic

It's a brilliant, vital human document.

Full Review… | December 31, 1999
Washington Post
Top Critic

The latest installment in the most engrossing long-distance documentary project in the history of film.

Full Review… | December 31, 1999
Chicago Sun-Times
Top Critic

Audience Reviews for 35 Up

Heavy stuff! I feel like it just gets darker. It's crazy how much people change and how difficult it is to predict.

Harrison W
Harrison W

Perhaps I should review Apted's series in its totality but each of these films has their uniqueness and charms. This one is no exception although some of the children who were originally filmed in 1963 declined to be in this and subsequent series. Lives are falling a bit apart for our subjects. All the more reason to get updated in 42 Up.

John Ballantine
John Ballantine

Super Reviewer

This series is great. Well worth watching from the start, but maybe with a few month's worth of rest between each film (unlike what I did) otherwise the flashbacks get a bit much. By 35 up I was starting to feel like it was all flashback and no current footage.

Angela Alcorn
Angela Alcorn

Super Reviewer

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