47 Meters Down: Uncaged Reviews

August 16, 2019
Roberts has clearly been given a bigger budget and it shows in the nicely realized submerged city the poor young women must navigate.
August 16, 2019
The last gasp of a shark saga that didn't need to come up for air.
August 16, 2019
Like most films that are set almost entirely underwater, this is not a particularly appealing film from a visual perspective.
August 15, 2019
This brainless sequel to 47 Meters Down forsakes much of what made that 2017 survival thriller the lean and mean success it was, a credible shark threat being first and foremost.
August 15, 2019
The action is unclear and the menace unconvincing. The tin-eared dialogue - of which there is a shocking amount, for a movie set largely underwater - doesn't help either.
August 14, 2019
Feel free to stay out of the water with this one.
August 14, 2019
Uncaged improves on the first film only with its ending: This one boasts a modestly effective twist rather than a truly moronic one. Encouraging, but not nearly enough to justify a third trip down this 47-meter well.
August 14, 2019
It is not often that you watch a killer-shark movie and start feeling sympathy for the shark. But 47 Meters Down: Uncaged is no ordinary killer-shark movie - it is much, much worse.
August 14, 2019
Set disbelief aside, and primal phobias may well suffice to get you happily to the other side of this adventure.
August 14, 2019
The dialogue may be banal - "This place is insane, right?" and "We can't give up!" - yet there is an unpredictability to Roberts' action sequences, both nodding to the conventions of shark thrillers and subverting them.
August 14, 2019
As an unrelated sequel to a film that was originally set to premiere on the bottom shelf of a supermarket, this is better than it needs to be.
August 14, 2019
There's little in "47 Meters Down: Uncaged" that really sticks. The shocks, however, are consistently well-timed, and for the audience that seeks out a movie like this one that's probably enough.
August 14, 2019
Returning to the well for his second film in which thrills are in more abundant supply than oxygen, Johannes Roberts reconfirms the enduring dramatic alchemy of a hungry shark and a smorgasbord of delicious-looking people.