5 to 7 (2015) - Rotten Tomatoes

5 to 7 (2015)

TOMATOMETER

AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: 5 to 7 too often settles for rom-com clichés, but they're offset by its charming stars, sensitive direction, and a deceptively smart screenplay.

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Movie Info

A chance encounter on the streets of Manhattan draws 20-something aspiring writer Brian (Anton Yelchin) into a passionate love affair with a glamorous French woman (Skyfall Bond girl Bérénice Marlohe). The catch? She's married, and can only meet him for hotel room trysts between the hours of 5 and 7. As Brian yearns for more than just two hours a day with the woman of his dreams, he learns hard won lessons about life and love. Co-starring Frank Langella, Glenn Close, and Olivia Thirlby, this sexy romance captures the giddy thrill, the pain and the comedy of being young and falling in love. (C) IFC Films
Rating:
R (for some sexual material)
Genre:
Comedy , Romance
Directed By:
Written By:
In Theaters:
 limited
On DVD:
Box Office:
$117,066.00
Runtime:
Studio:

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Critic Reviews for 5 to 7

All Critics (53) | Top Critics (21)

The strong cast, a beautiful score, and a surprisingly affecting ending make it more convincing that it seems at first.

Full Review… | April 28, 2015
Fort Worth Star-Telegram/DFW.com
Top Critic

Though Yelchin does not elevate his role much above pasty callowness, Marlohe brings to hers a luminous irony and melancholy that makes her the ideal elusive beauty of hyper-romantic adolescent dreams.

Full Review… | April 23, 2015
Boston Globe
Top Critic

The problem with 5 to 7 is that the most important romance, between Brian and Arielle, never feels real.

Full Review… | April 23, 2015
Philadelphia Inquirer
Top Critic

One of the best date-night movies of the season without a doubt.

Full Review… | April 23, 2015
Minneapolis Star Tribune
Top Critic

There aren't many surprises in "5 to 7," unless you count such startlingly cliched bits of dialogue as "Life is a collection of moments" and "There's no free lunch."

Full Review… | April 23, 2015
Washington Post
Top Critic

The Brian-and-Arielle story never quite feels believable; it plays more like a novel than a genuine love story, like a work in progress, rather than a beginning and, inevitably, an end.

Full Review… | April 17, 2015
Seattle Times
Top Critic

Audience Reviews for 5 to 7

½

What a charming romantic drama! I love its uniquely European themes despite being set in New York (which I wouldn't reveal here to avoid spoilers). The ending is a bit unexpected, but it is still worth watching.

Thomas Andrikus
Thomas Andrikus

A little syrupy and melodramatic at the end, but this romantic comedy is clever and touching for the most part, and Bérénice Marlohe is absolutely radiant in her role as the 33-year-old French woman who is honest to everyone about the affair she's having with a 24-year-old aspiring writer (telling her husband, her kids, his parents, etc). Despite the maturity and understanding of the 'agreement' they have, feelings inevitably get involved. The movie is restrained in showing no nudity and little sex, but I think it was more erotic as a result. It's too bad the ending wasn't a bit more restrained as well. I loved the shots of personalized plaques on benches in Central Park, and the movie's last line: "I will promise you this. Your favorite story, whatever it might be, was written for one reader." I also liked this uplifting line: "Put aside your notions about how people are. The world will surprise you with its grace if you let it."

Antonius Block
Antonius Block

Super Reviewer

A New York writer and a French ambassador's wife have a long-lasting, fulfilling open affair. Filled with poetic, heartening moments and some surprisingly funny dialogue (almost Woody Allen-esque in their clever self-deprecation), director Victor Levin's wistful romance is a delight. Berenice Marlohe's luminous smile lights Arielle's melancholy, and Anton Yelchin is a solid romantic lead, and every romantic comedy should feature Glenn Close and Frank Langella as disapproving parents. The film doesn't have much new to say about love or marriage, but it shows old truths in affecting and compelling ways. Overall, you should see this movie if only to see the one-liners on Central Park benches - lovely poems, all of them.

Jim Hunter
Jim Hunter

Super Reviewer

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