8 Million Ways To Die Reviews

  • Feb 20, 2021

    8 Million Ways to Die is about as subtle as hitting someone in the head with a frying pan. This is never more evident than in the opening scene and the climax. Both of those big moments feature “dramatic” confrontations that consist of guns being pointed while people incessantly shout at one another. And there is no content to the words yelled back and forth beyond repetition of various threats. I had to mute the film for a few minutes in the stand-off at the end, as it started to become too obnoxious for me. It seems pretty clear that they didn’t have any dialogue written down for the actors, so they just kept screaming the same things louder and louder. This is an amateur’s idea of how to raise tension in a scene, by merely raising the volume. It’s a shame because there is some talent in the cast, but they are given little to work with. You’d think a movie with Jeff Bridges, Rosanna Arquette, and Andy Garcia (along with some other familiar faces) would be worth exploring but this is not at all. The story of 8 Million Ways to Die is messy at best. Somehow, for no logical reason, the main character allows himself to get drawn deeper and deeper into a prostitution and drug plot. For some reason, he feels obligated to help these girls that have no good explanation for why they sought his assistance in the first place. It’s treated like a big mystery, but from the moment you meet all the main characters, a 5-year-old could discern who was the main villain. While the specifics of his plot may be a bit surprising, they don’t matter all that much. In fact, the few things they do in order to obfuscate who was behind the crimes in this movie didn’t seem to have a logical purpose in the plot beyond a lame attempt to manufacture a mystery. There was literally only one scene where I had hope, for a fleeting instant, that 8 Million Ways to Die was actually going to be an interesting film that went down an unexpected path. Sadly, that turned out to be too much to hope for, and the movie is actually just a trainwreck that wasn’t worth my time.

    8 Million Ways to Die is about as subtle as hitting someone in the head with a frying pan. This is never more evident than in the opening scene and the climax. Both of those big moments feature “dramatic” confrontations that consist of guns being pointed while people incessantly shout at one another. And there is no content to the words yelled back and forth beyond repetition of various threats. I had to mute the film for a few minutes in the stand-off at the end, as it started to become too obnoxious for me. It seems pretty clear that they didn’t have any dialogue written down for the actors, so they just kept screaming the same things louder and louder. This is an amateur’s idea of how to raise tension in a scene, by merely raising the volume. It’s a shame because there is some talent in the cast, but they are given little to work with. You’d think a movie with Jeff Bridges, Rosanna Arquette, and Andy Garcia (along with some other familiar faces) would be worth exploring but this is not at all. The story of 8 Million Ways to Die is messy at best. Somehow, for no logical reason, the main character allows himself to get drawn deeper and deeper into a prostitution and drug plot. For some reason, he feels obligated to help these girls that have no good explanation for why they sought his assistance in the first place. It’s treated like a big mystery, but from the moment you meet all the main characters, a 5-year-old could discern who was the main villain. While the specifics of his plot may be a bit surprising, they don’t matter all that much. In fact, the few things they do in order to obfuscate who was behind the crimes in this movie didn’t seem to have a logical purpose in the plot beyond a lame attempt to manufacture a mystery. There was literally only one scene where I had hope, for a fleeting instant, that 8 Million Ways to Die was actually going to be an interesting film that went down an unexpected path. Sadly, that turned out to be too much to hope for, and the movie is actually just a trainwreck that wasn’t worth my time.

  • Mar 25, 2020

    Underrated 80s crime film by the legendary Hal Ashby with a unique fantastic soundtrack. The original screenplay was by Oliver Stone with dialog and scenes that are so over the top that Stone disowned the final film. That being said, its a fun film with Andy Garcia as an Antoni Gaudí obsessed, snow cone loving drug kingpin.

    Underrated 80s crime film by the legendary Hal Ashby with a unique fantastic soundtrack. The original screenplay was by Oliver Stone with dialog and scenes that are so over the top that Stone disowned the final film. That being said, its a fun film with Andy Garcia as an Antoni Gaudí obsessed, snow cone loving drug kingpin.

  • Dec 06, 2019

    Poor production value and editing. The interactions between Bridges and Garcia are a joke. The screaming scene at the end looks like pathetic improv that does nothing to create any tension. A great disappointment.

    Poor production value and editing. The interactions between Bridges and Garcia are a joke. The screaming scene at the end looks like pathetic improv that does nothing to create any tension. A great disappointment.

  • Aug 31, 2018

    It's a decent crime movie with a solid cast and an awesome score. It's just sad to know what it could've been without the studio interference.... The over-the-top performances were allegedly intentional and a directing choice to widdle and hone it down something remarkable, which we all know we could've gotten from actors like these.

    It's a decent crime movie with a solid cast and an awesome score. It's just sad to know what it could've been without the studio interference.... The over-the-top performances were allegedly intentional and a directing choice to widdle and hone it down something remarkable, which we all know we could've gotten from actors like these.

  • Jan 18, 2015

    no where near the book.

    no where near the book.

  • Dec 21, 2014

    watched '8 Million Ways to Die'(1986) starring Jeff Bridges, Rosanna Arquette, Andy Garcia et al. The hard-boiled movie is based on a novel of the same title by Lawrence Block. Its plot is not so exquisite but, thanks to the all-star casting, it's entertaining without in a visceral way. Andy was 30 years old when the movie was released and one year before he became famous with his performance in 'Untouchables'.

    watched '8 Million Ways to Die'(1986) starring Jeff Bridges, Rosanna Arquette, Andy Garcia et al. The hard-boiled movie is based on a novel of the same title by Lawrence Block. Its plot is not so exquisite but, thanks to the all-star casting, it's entertaining without in a visceral way. Andy was 30 years old when the movie was released and one year before he became famous with his performance in 'Untouchables'.

  • Nov 09, 2014

    This movie is definitely a product of its era and is fun to watch as a perfect time capsule of this type of 1980's detective story. Performances are over the top by everyone, story is laughable and the characters are incredibly stupid (you'll figure everything out long before they do). But it's still a hoot to watch.

    This movie is definitely a product of its era and is fun to watch as a perfect time capsule of this type of 1980's detective story. Performances are over the top by everyone, story is laughable and the characters are incredibly stupid (you'll figure everything out long before they do). But it's still a hoot to watch.

  • Jun 27, 2014

    One of my favorite movies, I love it. The acting, the cinematography that has a raw open feel is cool. I love the use of locations, as I did in another 86 flick, The Hitcher. There are moments in the film that are so realistic. it's like an exchange of dialogue in real life, where I feel it had a lot to do with ad libbing. Bridges is so believable as the booze hound detective, Matt Scudder, while it's the new Garcia who steals the movie as a pimp, called Angel. The credit opening tracking sequence is so cool and awesome, but so are a lot of moments in this flick. Alexandra Paul as the ill fated whore Sunny, you can just eat up. Though disjointed, EMWTD has some awesome dialogue, and there is that chase scene with Paul buying it in the back of a van in a daylight snatch, where the back van window turns crimson. If you love 1986 movies like I do, here's one you should see, no excuses, especially Scarface fans. If you wanna really see a cool things in a film that rides on coolness, this is the flick. I mean, just check out Angel's pad, and another one he buys later on.

    One of my favorite movies, I love it. The acting, the cinematography that has a raw open feel is cool. I love the use of locations, as I did in another 86 flick, The Hitcher. There are moments in the film that are so realistic. it's like an exchange of dialogue in real life, where I feel it had a lot to do with ad libbing. Bridges is so believable as the booze hound detective, Matt Scudder, while it's the new Garcia who steals the movie as a pimp, called Angel. The credit opening tracking sequence is so cool and awesome, but so are a lot of moments in this flick. Alexandra Paul as the ill fated whore Sunny, you can just eat up. Though disjointed, EMWTD has some awesome dialogue, and there is that chase scene with Paul buying it in the back of a van in a daylight snatch, where the back van window turns crimson. If you love 1986 movies like I do, here's one you should see, no excuses, especially Scarface fans. If you wanna really see a cool things in a film that rides on coolness, this is the flick. I mean, just check out Angel's pad, and another one he buys later on.

  • May 26, 2014

    Underrated 80s crime film, featuring one of my all-time favorite action scenes. Written by Oliver Stone right around the same time he wrote the iconic remake of "Scarface," this film shares many of the same 1980s elements of drugs, sleaze and guns. Fan of "Scarface" should all do themselves a favor and check this film out. The story is from a Lawrence Block novel about Matthew Scudder, played by Jeff Bridges, a former police officer turned PI. Scudder gets caught up in the murder of a high price prostitute, Alexandra Paul. Andy Garcia is a terrifically scary as a smiling pony tailed drug dealer. Rosanna Arquette plays a woman caught between Bridges and Garcia. The story kind of drags as points, but the film has some truly memorable scenes and superb performances, particularly Bridges and Carcia. But if for nothing else, watch this film for the amazingly awesome awesome warehouse showdown finale. Director Hal Ashby builds some amazing tension and does is with flair and style that I can't say I'd seen in his pervious work. There's great glossy 80s photography by director of photography Stephen H. Burum and a fitting synthesizer score by James Newton Howard in one of his very first film credits. Robert Towne reportedly did uncredited rewrites and the film has Tiny'Lister, so how can you not watch this film? But seriously, if for nothing else, watch this film for the warehouse finale. It really is amazing.

    Underrated 80s crime film, featuring one of my all-time favorite action scenes. Written by Oliver Stone right around the same time he wrote the iconic remake of "Scarface," this film shares many of the same 1980s elements of drugs, sleaze and guns. Fan of "Scarface" should all do themselves a favor and check this film out. The story is from a Lawrence Block novel about Matthew Scudder, played by Jeff Bridges, a former police officer turned PI. Scudder gets caught up in the murder of a high price prostitute, Alexandra Paul. Andy Garcia is a terrifically scary as a smiling pony tailed drug dealer. Rosanna Arquette plays a woman caught between Bridges and Garcia. The story kind of drags as points, but the film has some truly memorable scenes and superb performances, particularly Bridges and Carcia. But if for nothing else, watch this film for the amazingly awesome awesome warehouse showdown finale. Director Hal Ashby builds some amazing tension and does is with flair and style that I can't say I'd seen in his pervious work. There's great glossy 80s photography by director of photography Stephen H. Burum and a fitting synthesizer score by James Newton Howard in one of his very first film credits. Robert Towne reportedly did uncredited rewrites and the film has Tiny'Lister, so how can you not watch this film? But seriously, if for nothing else, watch this film for the warehouse finale. It really is amazing.

  • Apr 02, 2014

    A really good little slice of sweaty, neon coated 80's noir with great Jeff Bridges turning in a really tough, grizzled badass, the sort of real manly man role you dont see todays pretty boy hunks do, as a hopelessly alcoholic ex cop out to avenge a brutally murdered hooker. It's small and slight but it's pleasures are many, a stylish, cool, hard edged bit of lurid fun.

    A really good little slice of sweaty, neon coated 80's noir with great Jeff Bridges turning in a really tough, grizzled badass, the sort of real manly man role you dont see todays pretty boy hunks do, as a hopelessly alcoholic ex cop out to avenge a brutally murdered hooker. It's small and slight but it's pleasures are many, a stylish, cool, hard edged bit of lurid fun.