El (This Strange Passion) (Torments) Reviews

  • Oct 25, 2019

    Movies is not so interesting as the fact that Buñuel (a Spaniard living in Mexico, two very heteropatriarcal societies) tells the story of a man who mistreats women, making what seems an accurate psychological portrait of a representative example.

    Movies is not so interesting as the fact that Buñuel (a Spaniard living in Mexico, two very heteropatriarcal societies) tells the story of a man who mistreats women, making what seems an accurate psychological portrait of a representative example.

  • Apr 20, 2019

    A good film about narcissism that won't innovate that much next to other of Buñuel's Works. Great script though

    A good film about narcissism that won't innovate that much next to other of Buñuel's Works. Great script though

  • Carlos M Super Reviewer
    May 09, 2018

    Gloria's passivity and determination to believe a man she barely knows becomes all the more exasperating as the narrative unfolds, but Buñuel creates a gripping portrait of male dominance, abuse and paranoia with a cynical last scene that couldn't be more meaningful.

    Gloria's passivity and determination to believe a man she barely knows becomes all the more exasperating as the narrative unfolds, but Buñuel creates a gripping portrait of male dominance, abuse and paranoia with a cynical last scene that couldn't be more meaningful.

  • Sep 10, 2015

    EL, in Spanish means "he", in this Buñuel's film, he is Francisco (de Córdova), an unmarried middle age bourgeois man, who is first seen as an assistant during a church ceremony in Mexico City, he is pouring water in the basin when Father Velasco (Baena) prepares to wash the feet of a young boy, and a close-up is zoomed in as Father kisses the foot he just washed, before another shot aiming a pair of female feet, the svelte legs then reveals they belong to a fine-looking woman Gloria (Garcés), whom Francisco falls for at first glance, lust stems from the sight of a pair of feet. So in hindsight, the tongue-in-cheek reference of feet fetish not just insinuates one of Francisco's essential quality is his religious fervour, but also incriminates religion as a main cause in his paranoid psyche. Seeing that it is also in the church, Francisco finally discharges all his rage over the tipping point, towards whom? Father Velasco, his dearest friend. keep reading my review on my blog: http://wp.me/p1eXom-20Z

    EL, in Spanish means "he", in this Buñuel's film, he is Francisco (de Córdova), an unmarried middle age bourgeois man, who is first seen as an assistant during a church ceremony in Mexico City, he is pouring water in the basin when Father Velasco (Baena) prepares to wash the feet of a young boy, and a close-up is zoomed in as Father kisses the foot he just washed, before another shot aiming a pair of female feet, the svelte legs then reveals they belong to a fine-looking woman Gloria (Garcés), whom Francisco falls for at first glance, lust stems from the sight of a pair of feet. So in hindsight, the tongue-in-cheek reference of feet fetish not just insinuates one of Francisco's essential quality is his religious fervour, but also incriminates religion as a main cause in his paranoid psyche. Seeing that it is also in the church, Francisco finally discharges all his rage over the tipping point, towards whom? Father Velasco, his dearest friend. keep reading my review on my blog: http://wp.me/p1eXom-20Z

  • Jan 18, 2015

    Apasionante relato sobre los celos y los fetiches de Luis Buñuel.

    Apasionante relato sobre los celos y los fetiches de Luis Buñuel.

  • Jan 01, 2015

    M-F-O 8.4 [Luis Buñuel] [Mx]

    M-F-O 8.4 [Luis Buñuel] [Mx]

  • Feb 01, 2014

    Over-the-top acting by Arturo de Cordova distracts from this lesser Bunuel melodrama.

    Over-the-top acting by Arturo de Cordova distracts from this lesser Bunuel melodrama.

  • Oct 12, 2013

    Un estudio interesante e inteligente sobre la paranoia y los celos, con el clásico humor negro de Buñuel. "Él" tiene una narrativa firme y un final que, aunque absurdo, rompe con el tono del resto de la película y deja un contraste palpable y genial.

    Un estudio interesante e inteligente sobre la paranoia y los celos, con el clásico humor negro de Buñuel. "Él" tiene una narrativa firme y un final que, aunque absurdo, rompe con el tono del resto de la película y deja un contraste palpable y genial.

  • Edgar C Super Reviewer
    Mar 28, 2013

    Well, what an intriguing conclusion! Why on Earth would Buñuel finish off the overbearing attitude of your typical macho bastard in the way he decided too (notice my spoiler-free intentions). Is he being sarcastic? We know his opinions on such matters. Sorry, but had to speak my mind. I still see it as a puzzle. 91/100

    Well, what an intriguing conclusion! Why on Earth would Buñuel finish off the overbearing attitude of your typical macho bastard in the way he decided too (notice my spoiler-free intentions). Is he being sarcastic? We know his opinions on such matters. Sorry, but had to speak my mind. I still see it as a puzzle. 91/100

  • Stella D Super Reviewer
    Feb 21, 2013

    one of the best bunuels i have seen. what a shame these mexican films are so overlooked in favor of his later french period. this one would do hitchcock proud and indeed he seems to have 'borrowed' a certain scene for the famous vertigo finale. much of the film would be funny if it wasn't so damn true to life

    one of the best bunuels i have seen. what a shame these mexican films are so overlooked in favor of his later french period. this one would do hitchcock proud and indeed he seems to have 'borrowed' a certain scene for the famous vertigo finale. much of the film would be funny if it wasn't so damn true to life