TRON Reviews

  • Sep 28, 2020

    A big and very stylized sci-fi action movie, Tron is definitely worth a watch at least once to those who aren't confused by its complex story and ideas. The most interesting part about it strangely comes from its unique commentary on religion, which might throw some people off to those thinking this is a Star Wars type epic.

    A big and very stylized sci-fi action movie, Tron is definitely worth a watch at least once to those who aren't confused by its complex story and ideas. The most interesting part about it strangely comes from its unique commentary on religion, which might throw some people off to those thinking this is a Star Wars type epic.

  • Sep 28, 2020

    A decent film but the effects are very dated and there is not much action throughout.

    A decent film but the effects are very dated and there is not much action throughout.

  • Sep 14, 2020

    Back in the days when digitization was tomorrow's creeping threat and computer programmers were modern-day wizards, Disney toyed with those preconceptions in a bold, experimental mixed narrative. Now, nearly forty years later, Tron serves as a curious time capsule and obvious trail blazer, if not a particularly good film. It splits time between two distinct landscapes: the physical world of dim video arcades, outlaw hackers and evil executives, plus a metaphorical digital reality with stylized unitards, neon grids and airbrushed horizons. The splashy graphics of the latter are what everyone associates with the picture, a jittering display of cutting edge techniques and loud influences that correctly anticipated countless visual trends of the coming decade. Back in grade school, I carried Trapper Keepers that stole, shamelessly, from this movie. Still, with so many years between then and now, nothing else has managed to look quite like Tron. Computer-aided effects have come miles since '82 - most of the big chase sequences, for example, look quaint in a modern light - but it's still memorably one-of-a-kind. By contrast, the storytelling is sluggish and obtuse, a mixed-up dinosaur that slings too many allegories for its own good. Eye candy is nice and all, but when that sugar rush crashes in the second act, the plot is just too convoluted, too concept-heavy, to compensate. That's usually the point where I fall asleep. Creatively ambitious and highly influential, Tron can't escape its snoozier tendencies. It's a textbook example of style over substance, despite the best efforts of young Jeff Bridges and a talented team of concept artists.

    Back in the days when digitization was tomorrow's creeping threat and computer programmers were modern-day wizards, Disney toyed with those preconceptions in a bold, experimental mixed narrative. Now, nearly forty years later, Tron serves as a curious time capsule and obvious trail blazer, if not a particularly good film. It splits time between two distinct landscapes: the physical world of dim video arcades, outlaw hackers and evil executives, plus a metaphorical digital reality with stylized unitards, neon grids and airbrushed horizons. The splashy graphics of the latter are what everyone associates with the picture, a jittering display of cutting edge techniques and loud influences that correctly anticipated countless visual trends of the coming decade. Back in grade school, I carried Trapper Keepers that stole, shamelessly, from this movie. Still, with so many years between then and now, nothing else has managed to look quite like Tron. Computer-aided effects have come miles since '82 - most of the big chase sequences, for example, look quaint in a modern light - but it's still memorably one-of-a-kind. By contrast, the storytelling is sluggish and obtuse, a mixed-up dinosaur that slings too many allegories for its own good. Eye candy is nice and all, but when that sugar rush crashes in the second act, the plot is just too convoluted, too concept-heavy, to compensate. That's usually the point where I fall asleep. Creatively ambitious and highly influential, Tron can't escape its snoozier tendencies. It's a textbook example of style over substance, despite the best efforts of young Jeff Bridges and a talented team of concept artists.

  • Sep 01, 2020

    Imaginative, groundbreaking, and as entertaining as 1980's science-fiction gets! Steven Lisberger's science-fiction adventure picture TRON (1982) is groundbreaking for its extraordinarily detailed and innovative practical and special effects. All the neon blues and reds still pop, but my favorite effect is Jeff Bridges' character Kevin Flynn getting scanned into his computer terminal and sucked into "The Grid," which is basically The Internet before there ever was one! TRON's effects will look dated and old to any viewer now, but you can see how well crafted and interesting to look at that all these vibrant colorful sets and effects remain. I would ask you to imagine seeing this movie for the first time in 1982 before home computers, the internet, cell phones, or video games. All there was were company consoles and arcade machines, which is staggering to think about the sheer creative force of Steven Lisberger and Bonnie MacBird's minds to come up with such fleshed out electric ideas for their highly influential film TRON. Lisberger's direction is fascinating as he captures your attention with striking 80's visuals in lively neon arcades and sterile company offices. He somehow found a way to convey his complex computer coding concepts to the silver screen with dazzling special effects and intricate layered practical effects. He keeps things moving for a fast 96 minutes with action, adventure, romance, and sci-fi high concepts. I really enjoy Jeff Bridges as the chill, genius game programer of The Grid and Space Paranoids: Kevin Flynn. He's also the terribly functioning program Clu, which is more of a clue that his character is too free-wheeling and independent to be a subordinate computer program. His desire for vindication for his video game designs is admirable, but it's Bridges' calm attitude and playful stoner vibe that makes Flynn such a nice lead character. Likewise, Bruce Boxleitner is sympathetic as the clever computer programer Alan Bradley with his strong morals and ethics for computer oversight, but we all know him as the voice and body of TRON himself! His distinctly deadpan voice is warm, yet distant. He's perfect as the hero TRON. I have to say that David Warner certainly earned his paycheck playing 3 different roles in TRON. He is the corporate villain Ed Dillinger with his quiet pouting and shrewd capitalist tactics. He's also the violent program Sark in his majestic tyranny and indignant rage. Lastly, Warner is also the voice of the Master Control Program: MCP! Cindy Morgan is gorgeous as the sweet scientist Lora, who has wonderful chemistry with Jeff Bridges and Bruce Boxleitner. She's also the supportive program Yori who loves TRON as she shares a lovely scene towards the end of TRON's finale. Barnard Hughes is nice as the elderly programmer Dr. Walter Gibbs and The Grid's Guardian Dumont. Dan Shor has a rather moving performance as the eager program Ram, who believes in The Users like Jeff Bridges' Kevin Flynn. They share a touching farewell. Shor was also the human co-worker to Alan that asks for some of his popcorn! TRON's cast is a special blend of character actors who all deliver. Syd Mead and Dean Mitzner's production is so cool with bright blue lines rigged all throughout The Grid as a vibrant, virtual liner to all these black computer spaces and sets. Roger M. Shook's set decoration looks modern and electrical by design for a cool retro feel. Eloise Jensson and Rosanna Norton's costumes are cute combinations of like electric tights and cardboard armor for a hazy feel and electronic aesthetic that maintains throughout TRON. Jeff Gourson's editing is slick and manages to cut to and fro around The Grid's effervescent liquid presence of nebulous spatial existence. I love Bruce Logan's cinematography. His wide and close-up shots in the live action portions are beautiful and as dreamy as any classic 80's movie. His cinematography for all the weird angles and perspectives in The Grid world are really neat and inventive as he had to shoot the computer scenes somehow. Wendy Carlos' score is crazy classical, jazz, and synth hybrids that sound disorienting and strange. You can call it terrible, but I find her music increasingly charming and quirky for the otherworldly vibe of TRON. Wendy does TRON's wicked imagination justice. Steven Lisberger and Bonnie MacBird's story is so imaginative that it boggles my mind just to think about now. Lisberger and MacBird came up with The Internet, virtual worlds, individual avatars, lightcycles, "derezzing" computer programs from existence, and more all centered around the hostile villain program Master Control Program (MCP). It's like a logical extension of WarGames' computer programming concept except that TRON came out the year before in 1983! The only early sci-fi films I can think of as expanding upon similar ideas or aesthetics would be Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) and David Cronenberg's Scanners (1981). Their dialogue is complicated and hard to follow, but if you pay attention, they do attempt to explain what in the world is going on on screen. TRON has a cool, creative, and original story with all manner of fun outlets for action like the electronic discs, light-cycles, hover planes, and beaming people into the virtual world and back to reality. Lisberger was clearly a brilliant writer with an imagination far greater than what cameras could capture at the time. I can only say to give TRON a chance.

    Imaginative, groundbreaking, and as entertaining as 1980's science-fiction gets! Steven Lisberger's science-fiction adventure picture TRON (1982) is groundbreaking for its extraordinarily detailed and innovative practical and special effects. All the neon blues and reds still pop, but my favorite effect is Jeff Bridges' character Kevin Flynn getting scanned into his computer terminal and sucked into "The Grid," which is basically The Internet before there ever was one! TRON's effects will look dated and old to any viewer now, but you can see how well crafted and interesting to look at that all these vibrant colorful sets and effects remain. I would ask you to imagine seeing this movie for the first time in 1982 before home computers, the internet, cell phones, or video games. All there was were company consoles and arcade machines, which is staggering to think about the sheer creative force of Steven Lisberger and Bonnie MacBird's minds to come up with such fleshed out electric ideas for their highly influential film TRON. Lisberger's direction is fascinating as he captures your attention with striking 80's visuals in lively neon arcades and sterile company offices. He somehow found a way to convey his complex computer coding concepts to the silver screen with dazzling special effects and intricate layered practical effects. He keeps things moving for a fast 96 minutes with action, adventure, romance, and sci-fi high concepts. I really enjoy Jeff Bridges as the chill, genius game programer of The Grid and Space Paranoids: Kevin Flynn. He's also the terribly functioning program Clu, which is more of a clue that his character is too free-wheeling and independent to be a subordinate computer program. His desire for vindication for his video game designs is admirable, but it's Bridges' calm attitude and playful stoner vibe that makes Flynn such a nice lead character. Likewise, Bruce Boxleitner is sympathetic as the clever computer programer Alan Bradley with his strong morals and ethics for computer oversight, but we all know him as the voice and body of TRON himself! His distinctly deadpan voice is warm, yet distant. He's perfect as the hero TRON. I have to say that David Warner certainly earned his paycheck playing 3 different roles in TRON. He is the corporate villain Ed Dillinger with his quiet pouting and shrewd capitalist tactics. He's also the violent program Sark in his majestic tyranny and indignant rage. Lastly, Warner is also the voice of the Master Control Program: MCP! Cindy Morgan is gorgeous as the sweet scientist Lora, who has wonderful chemistry with Jeff Bridges and Bruce Boxleitner. She's also the supportive program Yori who loves TRON as she shares a lovely scene towards the end of TRON's finale. Barnard Hughes is nice as the elderly programmer Dr. Walter Gibbs and The Grid's Guardian Dumont. Dan Shor has a rather moving performance as the eager program Ram, who believes in The Users like Jeff Bridges' Kevin Flynn. They share a touching farewell. Shor was also the human co-worker to Alan that asks for some of his popcorn! TRON's cast is a special blend of character actors who all deliver. Syd Mead and Dean Mitzner's production is so cool with bright blue lines rigged all throughout The Grid as a vibrant, virtual liner to all these black computer spaces and sets. Roger M. Shook's set decoration looks modern and electrical by design for a cool retro feel. Eloise Jensson and Rosanna Norton's costumes are cute combinations of like electric tights and cardboard armor for a hazy feel and electronic aesthetic that maintains throughout TRON. Jeff Gourson's editing is slick and manages to cut to and fro around The Grid's effervescent liquid presence of nebulous spatial existence. I love Bruce Logan's cinematography. His wide and close-up shots in the live action portions are beautiful and as dreamy as any classic 80's movie. His cinematography for all the weird angles and perspectives in The Grid world are really neat and inventive as he had to shoot the computer scenes somehow. Wendy Carlos' score is crazy classical, jazz, and synth hybrids that sound disorienting and strange. You can call it terrible, but I find her music increasingly charming and quirky for the otherworldly vibe of TRON. Wendy does TRON's wicked imagination justice. Steven Lisberger and Bonnie MacBird's story is so imaginative that it boggles my mind just to think about now. Lisberger and MacBird came up with The Internet, virtual worlds, individual avatars, lightcycles, "derezzing" computer programs from existence, and more all centered around the hostile villain program Master Control Program (MCP). It's like a logical extension of WarGames' computer programming concept except that TRON came out the year before in 1983! The only early sci-fi films I can think of as expanding upon similar ideas or aesthetics would be Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) and David Cronenberg's Scanners (1981). Their dialogue is complicated and hard to follow, but if you pay attention, they do attempt to explain what in the world is going on on screen. TRON has a cool, creative, and original story with all manner of fun outlets for action like the electronic discs, light-cycles, hover planes, and beaming people into the virtual world and back to reality. Lisberger was clearly a brilliant writer with an imagination far greater than what cameras could capture at the time. I can only say to give TRON a chance.

  • Aug 29, 2020

    It's a classic. But only computer geeks will get all the jargon.

    It's a classic. But only computer geeks will get all the jargon.

  • Aug 28, 2020

    tron is awesome disney movie i love tron

    tron is awesome disney movie i love tron

  • Aug 24, 2020

    Tron, the movie's got an interesting plot, which is about this lad called Kevin (Jeff Bridges), who's a software programmer. He's later dragged into the virtual world, where he's against an evil software. He ends up taking the help of Tron, which is pretty much this security programme which ends up helping him to defeat the villain. The movie's got some not so good acting from the cast and the dialogue from the characters throughout this movie is very cringey and cheesy. Also, the pacing for the build ups throughout this movie aren't great, certain moments could be built up a little bit better. The light cycle scenes are decent but the visual effects, which are used for them aren't great. Finally, the Visual effects don't hold up very well. All of the effects which are used throughout this movie don't hold up very well and they're very outdated. Overall, Tron has got an interesting plot, not great acting, cheesy dialogue, not great pacing, decent light cycle scenes and lots of very outdated effects.

    Tron, the movie's got an interesting plot, which is about this lad called Kevin (Jeff Bridges), who's a software programmer. He's later dragged into the virtual world, where he's against an evil software. He ends up taking the help of Tron, which is pretty much this security programme which ends up helping him to defeat the villain. The movie's got some not so good acting from the cast and the dialogue from the characters throughout this movie is very cringey and cheesy. Also, the pacing for the build ups throughout this movie aren't great, certain moments could be built up a little bit better. The light cycle scenes are decent but the visual effects, which are used for them aren't great. Finally, the Visual effects don't hold up very well. All of the effects which are used throughout this movie don't hold up very well and they're very outdated. Overall, Tron has got an interesting plot, not great acting, cheesy dialogue, not great pacing, decent light cycle scenes and lots of very outdated effects.

  • Aug 22, 2020

    Tron, had a lot of great ideas but I don't think they were entirely consistent or well though out. For starters why does a explorative technology engineering company, need to steal video games. Another would be how does a printed paper saying that you made the video games prove anything. Even with all the movies faults, I actually enjoyed the film. I liked how they tied the grid to the real world and I really liked the characters. My favorite character by far was Yori, even though she was kinda two timing. I feel that she honestly didn't get enough respect, if it wasn't for her, Tron and Flynn would have been unsuccessful in their endeavors. Overall the film is good if your a huge nerd, who can ignore some plot holes.

    Tron, had a lot of great ideas but I don't think they were entirely consistent or well though out. For starters why does a explorative technology engineering company, need to steal video games. Another would be how does a printed paper saying that you made the video games prove anything. Even with all the movies faults, I actually enjoyed the film. I liked how they tied the grid to the real world and I really liked the characters. My favorite character by far was Yori, even though she was kinda two timing. I feel that she honestly didn't get enough respect, if it wasn't for her, Tron and Flynn would have been unsuccessful in their endeavors. Overall the film is good if your a huge nerd, who can ignore some plot holes.

  • Aug 20, 2020

    This movie is what made me interested in technology. It might be an little bit old in visuals but I think it still holds up today and I hope the series will continue in the future.

    This movie is what made me interested in technology. It might be an little bit old in visuals but I think it still holds up today and I hope the series will continue in the future.

  • Aug 20, 2020

    Queer but wonderful.

    Queer but wonderful.