A Safe Place (1971) - Rotten Tomatoes

A Safe Place (1971)

A Safe Place (1971)

TOMATOMETER

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AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: No consensus yet.

A Safe Place Photos

Movie Info

In this autobiographical, experimental fantasy, director Henry Jaglom, actress Tuesday Weld, and several of his friends watch as Weld goes back to her childhood to find the one place in the world where she felt safe.

Cast

Tuesday Weld
as Susan / Noah
Orson Welles
as The Magician
Barbara Flood
as the Friend
Roger Garrett
as the Friend
Jordon Hahn
as the Friend
Francesca Hilton
as the Friend
Julie Robinson
as the Friend
Rhonda Alfaro
as Little Girl in Rowboat
Sylvia Zapp
as Susan age 5
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Critic Reviews for A Safe Place

There are no critic reviews yet for A Safe Place. Keep checking Rotten Tomatoes for updates!

Audience Reviews for A Safe Place

½

Another very good Tuesday Weld performance lost in a very muddled disconnected movie.

jay nixon
jay nixon

Super Reviewer

Another head-scratch inducing film from the BBS library. I think I wrapped my head around it and it turns out it's just one of those weird plays you got dragged to in college trying to impress a hip girl you wanted to date. I felt nothing for Tuesday Weld and her plight which basically focuses on trying to figure out what kind of person that she wanted to be all the while not wanting to grow up. Boo-hoo. These are the type of films that make me hate the entire movement of hippies.

Tim Sigur
Tim Sigur

Super Reviewer

½

Very strange film...comes off like a rough student project from someone who recently saw "Last Year at Marienbad" for the first time. One gets the impression that five or six extended improvisations were shot, and director Jaglom chopped them up, intertwined portions across the film's duration and chose certain bits to naggingly repeat. Tuesday Weld smiles, laughs, and philosophizes like a daydreaming child. Orson Welles -- with a awkward foreign accent -- does magic in the park, paternally cuddles with Weld and holds onto hopes of making things disappear with a word. The Firesign Theatre's Phil Proctor is a dull, passive-aggressive schmuck who fails to win Weld's heart by endlessly trying to think of world cities which span his love for her. Jack Nicholson (whose role is probably not substantial enough to satisfy curious fans) drops in, acts rakish and aims to steal Weld from Proctor. Scratchy torch ballads (mostly French) dawdle throughout the score, serving as aimless backdrop for the montages. As the credits rolled, I realized that I couldn't remember why Weld's character had been called both "Noah" and "Susan." It's that sort of movie.

Eric Broome
Eric Broome

Super Reviewer

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