A Canterbury Tale Reviews

  • Mar 03, 2021

    Regarded as something of a classic but I'm none the wiser as to why. The plot is absurd and the ending meekly ridiculous. The one interesting aspect is seeing wartime Kent and Canterbury.

    Regarded as something of a classic but I'm none the wiser as to why. The plot is absurd and the ending meekly ridiculous. The one interesting aspect is seeing wartime Kent and Canterbury.

  • Sep 14, 2020

    A Canterbury Tale is a 1944 British film by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger starring 🍿 Meh, it passed the time. Sort of. 😕

    A Canterbury Tale is a 1944 British film by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger starring 🍿 Meh, it passed the time. Sort of. 😕

  • Jan 12, 2020

    An atmospheric gem from another age. The story, the characters, the setting all go together to make a timeless masterpiece. I've watched this movie countless times, and it always completely engages me. One of my all-time favorites.

    An atmospheric gem from another age. The story, the characters, the setting all go together to make a timeless masterpiece. I've watched this movie countless times, and it always completely engages me. One of my all-time favorites.

  • Oct 30, 2016

    This classic film from Powell & Pressburger is widely respected, and though I did enjoy it, not so much as many of their other films that I have seen. It essentially follows three people on a journey, working together to solve a mystery, but each has their own purpose as well. The film is beautifully photographed and I did enjoy the scenery. It's definitely worth watching for fans of Powell & Pressburger though. Check it out.

    This classic film from Powell & Pressburger is widely respected, and though I did enjoy it, not so much as many of their other films that I have seen. It essentially follows three people on a journey, working together to solve a mystery, but each has their own purpose as well. The film is beautifully photographed and I did enjoy the scenery. It's definitely worth watching for fans of Powell & Pressburger though. Check it out.

  • May 15, 2016

    A Canterbury Tale is a courageous, imaginative, inspiring and highly enjoyable movie that is hard to put to any one genre.

    A Canterbury Tale is a courageous, imaginative, inspiring and highly enjoyable movie that is hard to put to any one genre.

  • Oct 15, 2015

    I watched A Canterbury Tale because it is one of the early post-war films by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, the team that bring us The Red Shoes and Tales of Hoffmann, two of my favorite films. A Canterbury Tale is not quite as good as their best but even that is better than many other films I have sat though. The movie borrows from the ideas of its namesake by Geoffrey Chaucer and features soldiers travelling to Canterbury near the end of the war. It is a good movie and anyone who enjoys black and white English-language films will enjoy it. There are a few scenes that didn't seem to be lit well, but that is nitpicking.

    I watched A Canterbury Tale because it is one of the early post-war films by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, the team that bring us The Red Shoes and Tales of Hoffmann, two of my favorite films. A Canterbury Tale is not quite as good as their best but even that is better than many other films I have sat though. The movie borrows from the ideas of its namesake by Geoffrey Chaucer and features soldiers travelling to Canterbury near the end of the war. It is a good movie and anyone who enjoys black and white English-language films will enjoy it. There are a few scenes that didn't seem to be lit well, but that is nitpicking.

  • Jan 19, 2015

    It was okay. I feel like I should have liked it more than I did. Something about it just never clicked into place for me sadly.

    It was okay. I feel like I should have liked it more than I did. Something about it just never clicked into place for me sadly.

  • Jul 29, 2014

    Silly me, expecting a contemporary retelling of a classic piece of literature. Instead, it was a hum-drum tale about uninteresting people that happened to take place near Canterbury.

    Silly me, expecting a contemporary retelling of a classic piece of literature. Instead, it was a hum-drum tale about uninteresting people that happened to take place near Canterbury.

  • Mar 10, 2014

    The more I sit down to watch what I think are going to be "minor" works by Powell and Pressburger (creators of The Red Shoes and Black Narcissus), the more I find myself bowled over by masterpieces of wonderment. Although not as amazing as (5 star rated) I Know Where I Am Going (1945), this lyrical wartime idyll follows three young people who find themselves in the tiny village of Chillingbourne, located on the pilgrim's road to Canterbury Cathedral (made famous by Chaucer, who gets a nod in the opening moments of the film). A mysterious "Glue Man" is putting said substance in women's hair in startling after dark attacks and the three leads (a "land girl" sent to help production on a local farm, an American GI, and a British soldier) try to solve the mystery. But Powell and Pressburger are less interested in the Glue Man and more interested in showing us the beauty of the English countryside and its simple pleasures. As our three pilgrims make their way to Canterbury, we are treated to a wave of cinematic epiphanies, truly glorious moments, and a rather plotless poetic film suddenly gains structure as they each receive the blessings that they had been seeking. Only the Glue Man's quest remains.

    The more I sit down to watch what I think are going to be "minor" works by Powell and Pressburger (creators of The Red Shoes and Black Narcissus), the more I find myself bowled over by masterpieces of wonderment. Although not as amazing as (5 star rated) I Know Where I Am Going (1945), this lyrical wartime idyll follows three young people who find themselves in the tiny village of Chillingbourne, located on the pilgrim's road to Canterbury Cathedral (made famous by Chaucer, who gets a nod in the opening moments of the film). A mysterious "Glue Man" is putting said substance in women's hair in startling after dark attacks and the three leads (a "land girl" sent to help production on a local farm, an American GI, and a British soldier) try to solve the mystery. But Powell and Pressburger are less interested in the Glue Man and more interested in showing us the beauty of the English countryside and its simple pleasures. As our three pilgrims make their way to Canterbury, we are treated to a wave of cinematic epiphanies, truly glorious moments, and a rather plotless poetic film suddenly gains structure as they each receive the blessings that they had been seeking. Only the Glue Man's quest remains.

  • Oct 19, 2013

    Powell and Pressburger really made some interesting films in the 40s, not least this one. Here is a film that defies genre and goes for story instead. In the frame of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales comes an odd little ditty about three characters meeting by chance in the fictional village of Chillingbourne, which given its proximity to Canterbury I can only assume was actually Selling. It's not really that important, what we have is a love-letter to Olde Kent, as it was during the war and an overwhelming sense of an England untouched by 30s style modernity. The really funny thing is the 'mystery' of The Glueman that drives the whole story is actually rather unimportant since this is a story about how war brings change and how Canterbury was traditionally a place the pilgrims went to to repent their sins or gain some sort of insight. P&P cleverly update this provenance to modern-day (1944) wartime characters via this strange, fun, enchanting sketch of Kent and how the characters all get what they were spiritually looking for in the ancient city of the title. The direction and cinematography is of the high quality you'd expect and there are a lot of moments that have a Kentish boy like me wanting to go out into my local environment and experience the wonder anew for myself. All the players do a very good job, and even the 'aww shucks' American refuses to grate which is quite an achievement on the part of John Sweet. It really is uplifting and a thoroughly enjoyable experience. Highly recommended.

    Powell and Pressburger really made some interesting films in the 40s, not least this one. Here is a film that defies genre and goes for story instead. In the frame of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales comes an odd little ditty about three characters meeting by chance in the fictional village of Chillingbourne, which given its proximity to Canterbury I can only assume was actually Selling. It's not really that important, what we have is a love-letter to Olde Kent, as it was during the war and an overwhelming sense of an England untouched by 30s style modernity. The really funny thing is the 'mystery' of The Glueman that drives the whole story is actually rather unimportant since this is a story about how war brings change and how Canterbury was traditionally a place the pilgrims went to to repent their sins or gain some sort of insight. P&P cleverly update this provenance to modern-day (1944) wartime characters via this strange, fun, enchanting sketch of Kent and how the characters all get what they were spiritually looking for in the ancient city of the title. The direction and cinematography is of the high quality you'd expect and there are a lot of moments that have a Kentish boy like me wanting to go out into my local environment and experience the wonder anew for myself. All the players do a very good job, and even the 'aww shucks' American refuses to grate which is quite an achievement on the part of John Sweet. It really is uplifting and a thoroughly enjoyable experience. Highly recommended.