A Cold Wind In August Reviews

  • Apr 11, 2019

    A Cold Wind In August - Runs Hot and Cold: This title tends to promise material of a profound nature but was wasted on this ultra low budget, semi-exploitation flick from the 60s. I never understood why it was rarely screened but after finally getting an opportunity to view it ï¿ 1/2" now understand the lack of general interest. Lola Albright, best remembered as a sultry TV beauty, tried hard to inject passion into her role of a 30 something, toughish ex-burlesque stripper, who's still good looking enough to attract most any man but, begins a torrid affair with a lad near half her age. The lad, awkwardly played by the somewhat intense Scott Marlow - who was actually too old (at 29) to make the age difference fully convincing. Director, Alexander Singer who seemed overly attracted to stories about aging women toying with younger men (Love Has Many Faces '65) had very little budget to develop anything more than a superficial examination of the doomed relationship. Acting honours go to the reliable Joe De Santos who scores as the thoughtful father of the young lad. Herschel Bernardi also impresses as Lola's rejected, caring friend ï¿ 1/2" these two bring a tad more class to an otherwise disappointing cheapie. This attracted some mild attention for the sensationalistic approach to its subject in this era but, offered little more. It now seems pathetic that cinemas ran these low budget productions as main features ï¿ 1/2" no wonder audiences trailed off at this time. Prolific TV and ï¿ 1/2~B' movie composer Gerald Fried dishes up an overly jazzy score, while the often under-utilised cinematographer, Floyd Crosby (High Noon '56) supplied the interesting but limited images. Some of the other supporting performers tend to need lessons.

    A Cold Wind In August - Runs Hot and Cold: This title tends to promise material of a profound nature but was wasted on this ultra low budget, semi-exploitation flick from the 60s. I never understood why it was rarely screened but after finally getting an opportunity to view it ï¿ 1/2" now understand the lack of general interest. Lola Albright, best remembered as a sultry TV beauty, tried hard to inject passion into her role of a 30 something, toughish ex-burlesque stripper, who's still good looking enough to attract most any man but, begins a torrid affair with a lad near half her age. The lad, awkwardly played by the somewhat intense Scott Marlow - who was actually too old (at 29) to make the age difference fully convincing. Director, Alexander Singer who seemed overly attracted to stories about aging women toying with younger men (Love Has Many Faces '65) had very little budget to develop anything more than a superficial examination of the doomed relationship. Acting honours go to the reliable Joe De Santos who scores as the thoughtful father of the young lad. Herschel Bernardi also impresses as Lola's rejected, caring friend ï¿ 1/2" these two bring a tad more class to an otherwise disappointing cheapie. This attracted some mild attention for the sensationalistic approach to its subject in this era but, offered little more. It now seems pathetic that cinemas ran these low budget productions as main features ï¿ 1/2" no wonder audiences trailed off at this time. Prolific TV and ï¿ 1/2~B' movie composer Gerald Fried dishes up an overly jazzy score, while the often under-utilised cinematographer, Floyd Crosby (High Noon '56) supplied the interesting but limited images. Some of the other supporting performers tend to need lessons.

  • jay n Super Reviewer
    Dec 19, 2010

    The film itself isn't much but Lola Albright is exceptional.

    The film itself isn't much but Lola Albright is exceptional.