Addicted To Fresno Reviews

  • Aug 08, 2018

    I am amazed at these reviews... but not really when I consider these same meatheads probably elected Trump. This is a very funny, very raunchy comedy with a great cast of character comedians and actors. I mean superior comedy- 4 stars!

    I am amazed at these reviews... but not really when I consider these same meatheads probably elected Trump. This is a very funny, very raunchy comedy with a great cast of character comedians and actors. I mean superior comedy- 4 stars!

  • Jan 12, 2018

    Nowhere near as good as But I'm A Cheerleader but still enjoyable. The perfect balance of adorable and deplorable makes for a consistently funny good time. Also it needed more Aubrey Plaza simply because she is awesome.

    Nowhere near as good as But I'm A Cheerleader but still enjoyable. The perfect balance of adorable and deplorable makes for a consistently funny good time. Also it needed more Aubrey Plaza simply because she is awesome.

  • Nov 16, 2017

    Addicted to Fresno tells the story of the tattered relationship between two sisters. Shannon (Judy Greer) is a sex addict who, despite being the older sister, is the one with her life in shambles. Martha (Natasha Lyonne) is the more responsible one, who lands Shannon a job with her as a hotel maid. Shannon's fresh start is thrown for a loop when she accidentally kills a guest she has sex with and they must find a way to cover up the murder. It's a premise with the potential for fun shenanigans and has the benefit of a strong cast that also includes Aubrey Plaza, Ron Livingston, Fred Armisen and Molly Shannon. Yet, despite all that, it's not very funny. There are a few moments that legitimately made me laugh, but far too little. The film also suffers from Shannon not being a lead that audiences want to root for. By the time Martha finally admits she's done with her sister, I didn't feel any kind of mixed emotion. It was more like, "it's about time, Martha." The performances by most of the cast help save a lackluster story and is the biggest reason to check this out. If you're not already a fan of some cast members, skip it.

    Addicted to Fresno tells the story of the tattered relationship between two sisters. Shannon (Judy Greer) is a sex addict who, despite being the older sister, is the one with her life in shambles. Martha (Natasha Lyonne) is the more responsible one, who lands Shannon a job with her as a hotel maid. Shannon's fresh start is thrown for a loop when she accidentally kills a guest she has sex with and they must find a way to cover up the murder. It's a premise with the potential for fun shenanigans and has the benefit of a strong cast that also includes Aubrey Plaza, Ron Livingston, Fred Armisen and Molly Shannon. Yet, despite all that, it's not very funny. There are a few moments that legitimately made me laugh, but far too little. The film also suffers from Shannon not being a lead that audiences want to root for. By the time Martha finally admits she's done with her sister, I didn't feel any kind of mixed emotion. It was more like, "it's about time, Martha." The performances by most of the cast help save a lackluster story and is the biggest reason to check this out. If you're not already a fan of some cast members, skip it.

  • Nov 12, 2017

    I saw this on Hulu, and having moved to Fresno, thought I'd check it out. I was impressed by the cast list as I love Judy Greer and many other big names listed, and while the reviews were low I still gave it a shot. The dark humor and situational drama were actually quite entertaining. Most movies with a rating this low, about twenty minutes in will reveal why the low rating. This movie kept me captive the whole time and made me laugh out loud a few times. I don't know why it's rated so low, it's actually a solid and funny film.

    I saw this on Hulu, and having moved to Fresno, thought I'd check it out. I was impressed by the cast list as I love Judy Greer and many other big names listed, and while the reviews were low I still gave it a shot. The dark humor and situational drama were actually quite entertaining. Most movies with a rating this low, about twenty minutes in will reveal why the low rating. This movie kept me captive the whole time and made me laugh out loud a few times. I don't know why it's rated so low, it's actually a solid and funny film.

  • Nov 30, 2016

    mean-spirited film with few laughs. Watch it anyway cuz the actors are pretty good in their roles

    mean-spirited film with few laughs. Watch it anyway cuz the actors are pretty good in their roles

  • Nov 26, 2016

    Had some funny parts but, just not that good

    Had some funny parts but, just not that good

  • Jul 05, 2016

    'Who gives a shit about Oprah.'

    'Who gives a shit about Oprah.'

  • Dec 02, 2015

    A female love interest that doesn't end in horror, finally.

    A female love interest that doesn't end in horror, finally.

  • Oct 05, 2015

    "Siblings can really sink each other." Not words commonly heard or realized often, but perhaps ones that can be true given particular circumstances. It's a theme that rings factual throughout this film, however unrealistic the scenarios. Addicted to Fresno follows two sisters in Shannon (Judy Greer), a seemingly recovered sex addict who has very little moral compass, and Martha (Natasha Lyonne), an eternal optimist who is always going over the top to help her sister with her issues and devotes very little attention to her own well-being. The two work as maids at a local hotel in their hometown of Fresno--a city where not much happens and the people there hate it yet can't seem to get out. Shannon's antics come to a nadir when she accidentally kills a man. She and her sister attempt to escape the mess, which will prove to either help or harm their already rocky relationship. It's definitely an anti-sibling movie--or at least it wants to be. I think mainly it strives to show us that the world is not as black and white as we have been brought up believing. Society tells us that as long as we hold on to family we'll be okay in the end. But sometimes they're the ones holding us back. The small town trope plays on the whole "being held back" theme. The girls are two complete opposite personalities, yet they both manage to become complacent in a city that doesn't offer much for either of them. The film is never hilarious, but does a good job of keeping the tone jovial throughout with some black comedy nuances and some enjoyable sequences thrown in, like a 13-year-old bar mitzvah boy performing a highly vulgar song filled with Jewish puns in front of his gasping relatives. We get some nice scenes from the supporting cast as well, including Fred Armisen as Gerald, the owner of a pet cemetery, who doesn't get nearly enough screen time, and Aubrey Plaza as Kelly, Martha's personal trainer, who gets plenty of screen time but is mostly underutilized. Solid scenes from Molly Shannon, Malcolm Barrett, and Kumail Nanjiani are mostly what make this film watchable. The timing of the two leads compliments their chemistry very well, but they are given very little in terms of laughable material. I understand that it's supposed to be somewhat of a black comedy, but it never fully commits. It's not obvious enough and most people may just chalk it up to being unfunny. The storyline is intriguing enough and I like most of the decisions that it happens to make, but if we're going to be sitting down to view a comedy we need to know what we're watching. Although a little uneven in terms of comedic tone, the laughs are there if you know where to find them. The story is one that hasn't really been told in quite this fashion before and the themes are relatable regardless of the impractical lengths of which it chooses to showcase them by. It helps that both characters are deep enough to attach ourselves to. It's not a terrible film by any means, it just speaks to a very specific crowd. And since its role as a comedy wears a bit thin, we may be tempted to dismiss the story as merely trivial. Twizard Rating: 74 **Review can also be found at http://movies.mxdwn.com/reviews/movie-review-addicted-to-fresno/

    "Siblings can really sink each other." Not words commonly heard or realized often, but perhaps ones that can be true given particular circumstances. It's a theme that rings factual throughout this film, however unrealistic the scenarios. Addicted to Fresno follows two sisters in Shannon (Judy Greer), a seemingly recovered sex addict who has very little moral compass, and Martha (Natasha Lyonne), an eternal optimist who is always going over the top to help her sister with her issues and devotes very little attention to her own well-being. The two work as maids at a local hotel in their hometown of Fresno--a city where not much happens and the people there hate it yet can't seem to get out. Shannon's antics come to a nadir when she accidentally kills a man. She and her sister attempt to escape the mess, which will prove to either help or harm their already rocky relationship. It's definitely an anti-sibling movie--or at least it wants to be. I think mainly it strives to show us that the world is not as black and white as we have been brought up believing. Society tells us that as long as we hold on to family we'll be okay in the end. But sometimes they're the ones holding us back. The small town trope plays on the whole "being held back" theme. The girls are two complete opposite personalities, yet they both manage to become complacent in a city that doesn't offer much for either of them. The film is never hilarious, but does a good job of keeping the tone jovial throughout with some black comedy nuances and some enjoyable sequences thrown in, like a 13-year-old bar mitzvah boy performing a highly vulgar song filled with Jewish puns in front of his gasping relatives. We get some nice scenes from the supporting cast as well, including Fred Armisen as Gerald, the owner of a pet cemetery, who doesn't get nearly enough screen time, and Aubrey Plaza as Kelly, Martha's personal trainer, who gets plenty of screen time but is mostly underutilized. Solid scenes from Molly Shannon, Malcolm Barrett, and Kumail Nanjiani are mostly what make this film watchable. The timing of the two leads compliments their chemistry very well, but they are given very little in terms of laughable material. I understand that it's supposed to be somewhat of a black comedy, but it never fully commits. It's not obvious enough and most people may just chalk it up to being unfunny. The storyline is intriguing enough and I like most of the decisions that it happens to make, but if we're going to be sitting down to view a comedy we need to know what we're watching. Although a little uneven in terms of comedic tone, the laughs are there if you know where to find them. The story is one that hasn't really been told in quite this fashion before and the themes are relatable regardless of the impractical lengths of which it chooses to showcase them by. It helps that both characters are deep enough to attach ourselves to. It's not a terrible film by any means, it just speaks to a very specific crowd. And since its role as a comedy wears a bit thin, we may be tempted to dismiss the story as merely trivial. Twizard Rating: 74 **Review can also be found at http://movies.mxdwn.com/reviews/movie-review-addicted-to-fresno/

  • Sep 29, 2015

    We enjoyed the movie.

    We enjoyed the movie.