After the Storm (Umi yori mo mada fukaku) Reviews

  • Jul 07, 2019

    Grandma steals the show. But overall the movie felt a little bit incomplete

    Grandma steals the show. But overall the movie felt a little bit incomplete

  • Dec 26, 2018

    wooW i have watched already few times using boxxy software Its cool!

    wooW i have watched already few times using boxxy software Its cool!

  • Oct 23, 2018

    I really into this film. The color, the story, actors - actress and everything, they made me feel cozy and relax. Strangely, it revokes the feeling of "family" in me although the family of the main character in this movie is broken off.

    I really into this film. The color, the story, actors - actress and everything, they made me feel cozy and relax. Strangely, it revokes the feeling of "family" in me although the family of the main character in this movie is broken off.

  • Sep 02, 2018

    Koreeda will teach you how to live.

    Koreeda will teach you how to live.

  • May 21, 2018

    Buena, lenta, muy lenta y casi aburrida. Va sobre un padre fracasado en la vida que lidia con su responsabilidad paterna y lo que significa triunfar en la vida. el fondo de la película es grandioso pero el desarrollo es tan lento que se las ideas se diluyen un poco.

    Buena, lenta, muy lenta y casi aburrida. Va sobre un padre fracasado en la vida que lidia con su responsabilidad paterna y lo que significa triunfar en la vida. el fondo de la película es grandioso pero el desarrollo es tan lento que se las ideas se diluyen un poco.

  • Apr 28, 2018

    Slow and steady you might not win a bicycle race, but you will find empathy and affection for these realistic characters. The dialogs are well written too, but there are a lot of them! So unless your japanese is up to speed, you might end up watching only half of the images (the bottom half). I should watch it again without subtitles, but I know I won't.

    Slow and steady you might not win a bicycle race, but you will find empathy and affection for these realistic characters. The dialogs are well written too, but there are a lot of them! So unless your japanese is up to speed, you might end up watching only half of the images (the bottom half). I should watch it again without subtitles, but I know I won't.

  • Mar 15, 2018

    I'm a big fan of Koreeda and it's nice to see him back on the right track after a few films in a row now that didn't live up to my expectations. A novelist is slacking around. Betting away his earnings, out of real writing jobs and makes his money on stalking realationships for proof of cheating - and then by blackmailing one part of the couple. His father died recently and he never really liked him. Sadly he's looking more like him, accoring to his sister and mom. However, his biggest concern is that he rearly sees his son. He loves him. His ex-wife is dating another guy and he knows every move they're making. She seem happy, he's not, but he hangs on to a slight hope of a reuniting of their realationship. Lovely acted, very realistic and as humane as Koreeda is at his best. It's never flat but it slowly makes you sympathize for the man, while you at the same time understand the break-up. I felt that this film really had something to say and that a lot of people can relate to this film. Dads, mothers, grandmothers, sons, hard workers, slackers - they all have issues, this is telling a typical one, very brilliantly. 8 out of 10 lottery tickets.

    I'm a big fan of Koreeda and it's nice to see him back on the right track after a few films in a row now that didn't live up to my expectations. A novelist is slacking around. Betting away his earnings, out of real writing jobs and makes his money on stalking realationships for proof of cheating - and then by blackmailing one part of the couple. His father died recently and he never really liked him. Sadly he's looking more like him, accoring to his sister and mom. However, his biggest concern is that he rearly sees his son. He loves him. His ex-wife is dating another guy and he knows every move they're making. She seem happy, he's not, but he hangs on to a slight hope of a reuniting of their realationship. Lovely acted, very realistic and as humane as Koreeda is at his best. It's never flat but it slowly makes you sympathize for the man, while you at the same time understand the break-up. I felt that this film really had something to say and that a lot of people can relate to this film. Dads, mothers, grandmothers, sons, hard workers, slackers - they all have issues, this is telling a typical one, very brilliantly. 8 out of 10 lottery tickets.

  • Oct 24, 2017

    I've been a big fan of director Kore-eda's films since I first stumbled into After Life (1998) in a cinema in London. Admittedly, that was probably his oddest film to date (showing dead people in limbo recreating their favourite memory from their lives) and perhaps his best. But he has matured into a director with a sensitive and subtle way of portraying everyday life and relationships, not shying away from serious moments but always imbuing events with both humour and humanity. It's the small moments (and the way the camera shows simple objects and environments, not unlike Ozu) that brings out the existentialism underlying Kore-eda's cinema, even if the larger arcs of the plot don't always go anywhere (much like some lives). Here, Hiroshi Abe plays a recently divorced man whose irresponsible father has just died; we see that he cares for his own son, aged 9 or 10, but also that he is also as irresponsible as his own father was. Abe's career as a novelist seems to have ended after one book and now he earns what little money he can as a private detective for a firm specialising in divorce work and lost pets. He blows a lot of his money gambling. He also can't seem to let go of his ex-wife and his dream of what could have been (including for his career). I guess the film's message is that he should move on (after the storm). This makes it unlike all those fantasies where the couple gets back together and everyone lives happily ever after. Instead, everyone's life is just in process and the point is to focus on the here-and-now rather than on future pipe dreams or melancholy longing for days gone by. Although all the cast is top notch, special mention must go to Kirin Kiki as the warm funny grandma.

    I've been a big fan of director Kore-eda's films since I first stumbled into After Life (1998) in a cinema in London. Admittedly, that was probably his oddest film to date (showing dead people in limbo recreating their favourite memory from their lives) and perhaps his best. But he has matured into a director with a sensitive and subtle way of portraying everyday life and relationships, not shying away from serious moments but always imbuing events with both humour and humanity. It's the small moments (and the way the camera shows simple objects and environments, not unlike Ozu) that brings out the existentialism underlying Kore-eda's cinema, even if the larger arcs of the plot don't always go anywhere (much like some lives). Here, Hiroshi Abe plays a recently divorced man whose irresponsible father has just died; we see that he cares for his own son, aged 9 or 10, but also that he is also as irresponsible as his own father was. Abe's career as a novelist seems to have ended after one book and now he earns what little money he can as a private detective for a firm specialising in divorce work and lost pets. He blows a lot of his money gambling. He also can't seem to let go of his ex-wife and his dream of what could have been (including for his career). I guess the film's message is that he should move on (after the storm). This makes it unlike all those fantasies where the couple gets back together and everyone lives happily ever after. Instead, everyone's life is just in process and the point is to focus on the here-and-now rather than on future pipe dreams or melancholy longing for days gone by. Although all the cast is top notch, special mention must go to Kirin Kiki as the warm funny grandma.

  • Oct 09, 2017

    A quiet, subtle, character study of personal growth at an age where that's often tossed aside, with dialogue that mimicks real life all too well while never feeling forced or out of place. 9/10

    A quiet, subtle, character study of personal growth at an age where that's often tossed aside, with dialogue that mimicks real life all too well while never feeling forced or out of place. 9/10

  • Byron B Super Reviewer
    Sep 11, 2017

    There are some funny moments in this Japanese gendai-geki (primarily with the Grandma character), but it is mostly a dramatic exploration of family life in contemporary Japan. Ryota (Hiroshi Abe) tries to reconnect with his son, his ex-wife, and his mother. There are many piercing universal observations about relationships and the modern world. The central family are all very natural performers. They are forced into close quarters and bond again when there is a big storm across the island. With a leisurely pace and the common Japanese stylistic touch of off-screen space this movie has a beautiful sense of repairing brokenness.

    There are some funny moments in this Japanese gendai-geki (primarily with the Grandma character), but it is mostly a dramatic exploration of family life in contemporary Japan. Ryota (Hiroshi Abe) tries to reconnect with his son, his ex-wife, and his mother. There are many piercing universal observations about relationships and the modern world. The central family are all very natural performers. They are forced into close quarters and bond again when there is a big storm across the island. With a leisurely pace and the common Japanese stylistic touch of off-screen space this movie has a beautiful sense of repairing brokenness.