Aguirre, the Wrath of God (Aguirre, der Zorn Gottes) Reviews

  • Sep 17, 2020

    I didn't like as much as most critics, mainly because of its slow pace, but I thought Aguirre was a well-made film led by a dark performance from Klaus Kinski and impressive direction from Werner Herzog.

    I didn't like as much as most critics, mainly because of its slow pace, but I thought Aguirre was a well-made film led by a dark performance from Klaus Kinski and impressive direction from Werner Herzog.

  • Jun 01, 2020

    Best movie of all time

    Best movie of all time

  • May 06, 2020

    With a shaky, handheld cam and a documentary style, Werner Herzog captures the nature at its grittiest, wildest and most most perilous to tell a story of a megalomaniac's descent into madness. It's a story of a man whose God completely denounced him because of his greed and delusions of grandeur, and therefore cursed him in the midst of paradise and turned it into hell. A hell of illusions, mirages and unfulfilled desires, preceded by inexplicable, dreadful nightmares and an ominous warning of a disturbing sound of silence. This is the Wrath of God that comes upon whoever exceed his limits as a human being. What strikes me about this is that it's a story of a grand scale, compressed into a compact 95-min long film without losing a pinch of its epic quality, and that's due to the perfect pacing, I guess. As my first Herzog, I'm really impressed by how his raw docu style feels so cinematic. Unlike other directors who only use some kind of a pseudo-documentary style to give their films an authentic feel, Werner's camerawork, as I mentioned above, fully adopt this style throughout the entire film. We even get, once in a while, observational and poetic shots. And, all of a sudden, a ghastly and hideous image is revealed, and then lingered upon it. Moreover, the way the film changed its tone and became a bit whimsical and implausible at the end is simply astonishing. However, I think there are some jarring tonal shifts between one act and the other. Other than that, this is a peerless masterwork of filmmaking and storytelling. (9/10)

    With a shaky, handheld cam and a documentary style, Werner Herzog captures the nature at its grittiest, wildest and most most perilous to tell a story of a megalomaniac's descent into madness. It's a story of a man whose God completely denounced him because of his greed and delusions of grandeur, and therefore cursed him in the midst of paradise and turned it into hell. A hell of illusions, mirages and unfulfilled desires, preceded by inexplicable, dreadful nightmares and an ominous warning of a disturbing sound of silence. This is the Wrath of God that comes upon whoever exceed his limits as a human being. What strikes me about this is that it's a story of a grand scale, compressed into a compact 95-min long film without losing a pinch of its epic quality, and that's due to the perfect pacing, I guess. As my first Herzog, I'm really impressed by how his raw docu style feels so cinematic. Unlike other directors who only use some kind of a pseudo-documentary style to give their films an authentic feel, Werner's camerawork, as I mentioned above, fully adopt this style throughout the entire film. We even get, once in a while, observational and poetic shots. And, all of a sudden, a ghastly and hideous image is revealed, and then lingered upon it. Moreover, the way the film changed its tone and became a bit whimsical and implausible at the end is simply astonishing. However, I think there are some jarring tonal shifts between one act and the other. Other than that, this is a peerless masterwork of filmmaking and storytelling. (9/10)

  • Apr 10, 2020

    Watching this film I concluded my personal "Amazon Madness Trilogy," which featured different meditations on the similar subject matter and started with "Lost City of Z," followed by "Embrace of the Serpent," and finally, "Aguirre," with the last two films being much more metaphorical and dreamlike. I feel like several of my recent reviews start with the words: "this is not for everybody..." and this film is probably no exception. The movie is mesmerizing in its pace and tone, and certainly the on-location filming on the Amazon itself lends to its etheric and mystical qualities. The lead role of Aguirre is played by nutcase German actor Klaus Kinski with maniacal fervor and barely chained explosiveness. The film should be watched to witness this seminal performance alone. There is an odd dark and absurdist humor in this film, lurking behind the horror and depravity that made me laugh out loud more than once, which is quite a feat given the complex and occasionally disturbing events that take place. Overall, I was hugely gratified watching this film, spell bound by a master of the craft (Herzog) depicting a story about Europeans on a quest to find a fabled city of gold in a foreign land that mirrors his own relentless pursuit of the goal of completing this harrowing production and making a mark for himself as one of the greatest living film directors. My only complaint was of the sound design. The dubbing of the dialogue into German was a little disorienting and about 2/3rds of the way through I stopped the film and found an English dub in YouTube and watched that. I believe the dialogue was performed in English so that helped me enjoy the film a little more. An improvement here would push my rating to 5 stars. The music was awesome, both the soundtrack and the natural pan flute played by one of the native characters on the raft. Highly recommend, for any cinemaphile, or especially for fans of "Apocalypse Now," who are interested in seeing a film that undoubtedly inspired Coppola.

    Watching this film I concluded my personal "Amazon Madness Trilogy," which featured different meditations on the similar subject matter and started with "Lost City of Z," followed by "Embrace of the Serpent," and finally, "Aguirre," with the last two films being much more metaphorical and dreamlike. I feel like several of my recent reviews start with the words: "this is not for everybody..." and this film is probably no exception. The movie is mesmerizing in its pace and tone, and certainly the on-location filming on the Amazon itself lends to its etheric and mystical qualities. The lead role of Aguirre is played by nutcase German actor Klaus Kinski with maniacal fervor and barely chained explosiveness. The film should be watched to witness this seminal performance alone. There is an odd dark and absurdist humor in this film, lurking behind the horror and depravity that made me laugh out loud more than once, which is quite a feat given the complex and occasionally disturbing events that take place. Overall, I was hugely gratified watching this film, spell bound by a master of the craft (Herzog) depicting a story about Europeans on a quest to find a fabled city of gold in a foreign land that mirrors his own relentless pursuit of the goal of completing this harrowing production and making a mark for himself as one of the greatest living film directors. My only complaint was of the sound design. The dubbing of the dialogue into German was a little disorienting and about 2/3rds of the way through I stopped the film and found an English dub in YouTube and watched that. I believe the dialogue was performed in English so that helped me enjoy the film a little more. An improvement here would push my rating to 5 stars. The music was awesome, both the soundtrack and the natural pan flute played by one of the native characters on the raft. Highly recommend, for any cinemaphile, or especially for fans of "Apocalypse Now," who are interested in seeing a film that undoubtedly inspired Coppola.

  • Mar 05, 2020

    Opting for more claustrophobic imagery to mirror the encroaching and ever-present Amazon, compared to the persistently sweeping vistas of the conventional epic, Aguirre manages to portray a more authentic depiction of its source material than most overblown historical pieces could ever hope to. Well-executed performances from all involved, though Kinski's intensity resolutely drives the narrative with a compelling portrayal of the madness brought on by grandeur and greed. (4.5/5)

    Opting for more claustrophobic imagery to mirror the encroaching and ever-present Amazon, compared to the persistently sweeping vistas of the conventional epic, Aguirre manages to portray a more authentic depiction of its source material than most overblown historical pieces could ever hope to. Well-executed performances from all involved, though Kinski's intensity resolutely drives the narrative with a compelling portrayal of the madness brought on by grandeur and greed. (4.5/5)

  • Jan 26, 2020

    Favorite movie of all times. Most from Werner Herzog are the best.

    Favorite movie of all times. Most from Werner Herzog are the best.

  • Jan 04, 2020

    Herzog's best film. A brutal classic.

    Herzog's best film. A brutal classic.

  • Nov 22, 2019

    Wow! A mind-bender! Everyone should see this!

    Wow! A mind-bender! Everyone should see this!

  • Nov 14, 2019

    Aguirre, the Wrath of God is a 1972 historical drama based on the legend of El Dorado. The film was directed by Werner Herzog, and stars Klaus Kinski as Lope de Aguirre and Helena Rojo as Inez. The story was captivating and extremely intriguing, and it felt like something that I've never seen before. The cast featuring Helena Rojo, Ruy Guerra, Cecilia Rivera, Del Negro, Peter Berling and Dan Ades all did a fantastic job at portraying their characters, but Klaus Kinski was definitely the stand out of the film, giving us a gripping and memorable performance. The characters I found to be really interesting and engaging; from the stern and power-hungry Lope de Aguirre to the sort of comedic Don Fernando de Guzman. The cinematography was beautifully handled and ended up giving us some breathtaking and unforgettable shots. The production design and costumes were really realistic and detailed, particularly with the vibrant and memorable sets of armour. The stunts and practical effects were remarkable, especially for the time; from the brutal and realistic looking action sequences to the daring and notable stunts. The locations although dangerous were still marvellous, ranging from the tall green trees by the flowing rivers to the high and rocky mountains. The soundtrack was strange but mystical, giving the film a unique and wonderfully atmospheric feel to it. The only notable problem I had with the film was that a couple of shots did feel out of place and ultimately pointless, but luckily all of those shots were only in the first ten minutes or so. The film I found to be incredibly fascinating and engaging, and I will definitely be watching it again soon. Overall I give it a 9/10 - great film, would definitely recommend

    Aguirre, the Wrath of God is a 1972 historical drama based on the legend of El Dorado. The film was directed by Werner Herzog, and stars Klaus Kinski as Lope de Aguirre and Helena Rojo as Inez. The story was captivating and extremely intriguing, and it felt like something that I've never seen before. The cast featuring Helena Rojo, Ruy Guerra, Cecilia Rivera, Del Negro, Peter Berling and Dan Ades all did a fantastic job at portraying their characters, but Klaus Kinski was definitely the stand out of the film, giving us a gripping and memorable performance. The characters I found to be really interesting and engaging; from the stern and power-hungry Lope de Aguirre to the sort of comedic Don Fernando de Guzman. The cinematography was beautifully handled and ended up giving us some breathtaking and unforgettable shots. The production design and costumes were really realistic and detailed, particularly with the vibrant and memorable sets of armour. The stunts and practical effects were remarkable, especially for the time; from the brutal and realistic looking action sequences to the daring and notable stunts. The locations although dangerous were still marvellous, ranging from the tall green trees by the flowing rivers to the high and rocky mountains. The soundtrack was strange but mystical, giving the film a unique and wonderfully atmospheric feel to it. The only notable problem I had with the film was that a couple of shots did feel out of place and ultimately pointless, but luckily all of those shots were only in the first ten minutes or so. The film I found to be incredibly fascinating and engaging, and I will definitely be watching it again soon. Overall I give it a 9/10 - great film, would definitely recommend

  • Aug 18, 2019

    This unique movie is largely a comedy about the absurdity of men and their obsessed desires for riches and glory, and how these desires lead to foolishness and cruelty... which is ironically mirrored by Herzog's obsession to make this movie. Aguirre, The Wrath of God is a great iconic film thou one can understand the complaints. The movie is largely improvised with the plot changing with the productions problems, most plot and action is implied than explicitly played out. All of the dialogue which would be in Spanish (but filmed originally in English for an international audience) is dubbed afterwards, and dubbed into German for TV and left like that. Not sure if any of sounds in the movie are actually from the scenes, the birds are stock recordings and probably most of the sound effects . The Popol Vuh music is incredible, beautiful, and iconic. Not sure if Kinski is actually doing much acting as he is mostly either pissed or brooding, but he does appear to stay in character quite convincingly. Apparently Kinski's voice is never in the movie at all since he refused to dub his lines, so his lines are done by a voice actor? Not a movie for everyone, and if you don't pay close attention at first you won't understand the story, but is very rewarding to watch again and again.

    This unique movie is largely a comedy about the absurdity of men and their obsessed desires for riches and glory, and how these desires lead to foolishness and cruelty... which is ironically mirrored by Herzog's obsession to make this movie. Aguirre, The Wrath of God is a great iconic film thou one can understand the complaints. The movie is largely improvised with the plot changing with the productions problems, most plot and action is implied than explicitly played out. All of the dialogue which would be in Spanish (but filmed originally in English for an international audience) is dubbed afterwards, and dubbed into German for TV and left like that. Not sure if any of sounds in the movie are actually from the scenes, the birds are stock recordings and probably most of the sound effects . The Popol Vuh music is incredible, beautiful, and iconic. Not sure if Kinski is actually doing much acting as he is mostly either pissed or brooding, but he does appear to stay in character quite convincingly. Apparently Kinski's voice is never in the movie at all since he refused to dub his lines, so his lines are done by a voice actor? Not a movie for everyone, and if you don't pay close attention at first you won't understand the story, but is very rewarding to watch again and again.