Aileen: Life and Death of a Serial Killer Reviews

  • Sep 03, 2019

    nuked by asteroid in 2019

    nuked by asteroid in 2019

  • Oct 01, 2017

    i found Nick's voice overs to be super dull & boring; by the end i was really quite annoyed by it, haha. but this was a pretty good doc. her story is fascinating & hearing what she had to say about it at the different points in her journey was interesting.

    i found Nick's voice overs to be super dull & boring; by the end i was really quite annoyed by it, haha. but this was a pretty good doc. her story is fascinating & hearing what she had to say about it at the different points in her journey was interesting.

  • Jul 24, 2017

    Nick Broomfield's Achilles Heel as a documentary maker is his obvious self-love: every subject is subordinate to his need to bask in their afterglow. It's as true here, where a pitiable and clearly damaged Aileen Wuornos, murderer of seven men, becomes a ticket to awards glory and critical adulation for the fiercely ambitious Broomfield. Broomfield is no Louis Theroux and his whiney voice-over is the final slap.

    Nick Broomfield's Achilles Heel as a documentary maker is his obvious self-love: every subject is subordinate to his need to bask in their afterglow. It's as true here, where a pitiable and clearly damaged Aileen Wuornos, murderer of seven men, becomes a ticket to awards glory and critical adulation for the fiercely ambitious Broomfield. Broomfield is no Louis Theroux and his whiney voice-over is the final slap.

  • May 19, 2017

    For those who watched Nick Broomfield's first documentary on Wuornos, this is more or less similar territory with more emphasis on one on one chats with the notorious serial killer. On the one hand, it could be argued quite reasonably that Wuornos was a victim of the environment in which she grew up and that would in some way provide justification for murder but the fact that she committed several murders after that certainly did not help her cause (especially in the eyes of the American Judicial System). Her constant raving against the justice system rings a bit hollow in light of the gratuitous nature of her crimes but she remains vehement until her death from lethal injection that she is more or less a pawn in a corrupt system.

    For those who watched Nick Broomfield's first documentary on Wuornos, this is more or less similar territory with more emphasis on one on one chats with the notorious serial killer. On the one hand, it could be argued quite reasonably that Wuornos was a victim of the environment in which she grew up and that would in some way provide justification for murder but the fact that she committed several murders after that certainly did not help her cause (especially in the eyes of the American Judicial System). Her constant raving against the justice system rings a bit hollow in light of the gratuitous nature of her crimes but she remains vehement until her death from lethal injection that she is more or less a pawn in a corrupt system.

  • Feb 19, 2017

    I can never decide if she was crazy, or just sad. Towards the end, there is no doubt that she had left reality. As for why she killed in the first place, I feel like the first one was self defense, but then after that it was anger. This lady had a rough life, maybe if it had been different, it would have ended better.

    I can never decide if she was crazy, or just sad. Towards the end, there is no doubt that she had left reality. As for why she killed in the first place, I feel like the first one was self defense, but then after that it was anger. This lady had a rough life, maybe if it had been different, it would have ended better.

  • Dec 19, 2016

    Nick Broomfield documenting the lead up to the execution of one of the most infamous female killers, was Aileen a product of her upbringing? A perpetrator or victim? Mad or bad? Broomfield's style provokes all of those to be questioned, whilst also cashing in like many others on the life and death of wuornos.

    Nick Broomfield documenting the lead up to the execution of one of the most infamous female killers, was Aileen a product of her upbringing? A perpetrator or victim? Mad or bad? Broomfield's style provokes all of those to be questioned, whilst also cashing in like many others on the life and death of wuornos.

  • Dec 07, 2016

    Shame that the main guy has a voice that would put a Teletubby to sleep. Interesting to get to know Aileen. The fact she would shout outwhen sentenced "I hope all your wives and kids will be raped in the ass" leads me to believe she was a vile horrible person & was duly shown her justice.

    Shame that the main guy has a voice that would put a Teletubby to sleep. Interesting to get to know Aileen. The fact she would shout outwhen sentenced "I hope all your wives and kids will be raped in the ass" leads me to believe she was a vile horrible person & was duly shown her justice.

  • Jun 17, 2016

    She worked as a hitchhiking hooker. This documentary recounts the tragedy of the first known female serial killer in the United States, Aileen Carol Wuornos, and tells the tale of her tragic childhood, unspeakable lifestyle, and horrific crimes that lead to her arrest and eventual death. We watch interviews all the way up to her final execution that leaves the motives of her actions scrambled. "I had a cow named Sir Angus McBeef." Nick Broomfield, director of numerous documentaries including Kurt and Courtney, Biggie and Tupac, Sarah Palin: You Betcha, Juvenile Liaison 1 & 2, and the upcoming Whitney Houston documentary, delivers Aileen: Life and Death of a Serial Killer. The storyline for this picture is mesmerizing, fascinating, and brilliantly told. The scenes, setting, and level of interviews and insight is brilliant. "Fuck you and the queen." This was on a list of best serial killer pictures on Netflix I came across on Facebook so I added it to my wish list...this was awesome. I loved how the tale was told and every interview up until the last minute. It really shows how tragic and intense life can be for some. I really, really recommend seeing this masterpiece. "Eight men have been shot to death in cold blood..." Grade: A

    She worked as a hitchhiking hooker. This documentary recounts the tragedy of the first known female serial killer in the United States, Aileen Carol Wuornos, and tells the tale of her tragic childhood, unspeakable lifestyle, and horrific crimes that lead to her arrest and eventual death. We watch interviews all the way up to her final execution that leaves the motives of her actions scrambled. "I had a cow named Sir Angus McBeef." Nick Broomfield, director of numerous documentaries including Kurt and Courtney, Biggie and Tupac, Sarah Palin: You Betcha, Juvenile Liaison 1 & 2, and the upcoming Whitney Houston documentary, delivers Aileen: Life and Death of a Serial Killer. The storyline for this picture is mesmerizing, fascinating, and brilliantly told. The scenes, setting, and level of interviews and insight is brilliant. "Fuck you and the queen." This was on a list of best serial killer pictures on Netflix I came across on Facebook so I added it to my wish list...this was awesome. I loved how the tale was told and every interview up until the last minute. It really shows how tragic and intense life can be for some. I really, really recommend seeing this masterpiece. "Eight men have been shot to death in cold blood..." Grade: A

  • Apr 21, 2016

    Whilst certainly jarring and unsettling due to Wuornos' particularly complex nature, as a documentary, this one is fairly by-the-book and somewhat scattered. There's certainly critique of the American Justice system here but its focus on Wuournos' own words takes away from this a little. I guess it comes down to the line that a documentary filmmaker should take between focussing on its specific case and on the wider implications of it. In this case, I would have liked more of the wider discussion and maybe a little less on the, sometimes difficult, Wuornos. Nonetheless, there's depth aplenty here and it certainly gets you thinking.

    Whilst certainly jarring and unsettling due to Wuornos' particularly complex nature, as a documentary, this one is fairly by-the-book and somewhat scattered. There's certainly critique of the American Justice system here but its focus on Wuournos' own words takes away from this a little. I guess it comes down to the line that a documentary filmmaker should take between focussing on its specific case and on the wider implications of it. In this case, I would have liked more of the wider discussion and maybe a little less on the, sometimes difficult, Wuornos. Nonetheless, there's depth aplenty here and it certainly gets you thinking.

  • Apr 21, 2016

    I finished this documentary having learned nothing. This was partially due to the fact that the subject of the film, Aileen, changes her story over and over, and comes across like a complete lunatic. This is to be expected, though, since it is about a convicted serial killer, and sanity is probably not the most common trait among serial killers. However, most documentarians dealing with crimes and criminals realize this, so they gather and present information from other sources (i.e., court records, crime scene evidence, interviews with police, witnesses, or victims' families/friends) so the viewer gets a complete enough picture to form an opinion. At the very least, the documentarian should question the subject's story, point out inconsistencies, catch the subject in a lie, etc. Nick Broomfield does none of this. He comes across like a gullible, naive child---simply absorbing story after story from Aileen and 2-3 other people in her life without ever questioning any story's validity, and without ever presenting a different point of view or opposing evidence. So I learned nothing. I still don't know anything about the murders or the case against Aileen. All I know is that Aileen was pretty wacky, and Nick Broomfield is a poor documentarian.

    I finished this documentary having learned nothing. This was partially due to the fact that the subject of the film, Aileen, changes her story over and over, and comes across like a complete lunatic. This is to be expected, though, since it is about a convicted serial killer, and sanity is probably not the most common trait among serial killers. However, most documentarians dealing with crimes and criminals realize this, so they gather and present information from other sources (i.e., court records, crime scene evidence, interviews with police, witnesses, or victims' families/friends) so the viewer gets a complete enough picture to form an opinion. At the very least, the documentarian should question the subject's story, point out inconsistencies, catch the subject in a lie, etc. Nick Broomfield does none of this. He comes across like a gullible, naive child---simply absorbing story after story from Aileen and 2-3 other people in her life without ever questioning any story's validity, and without ever presenting a different point of view or opposing evidence. So I learned nothing. I still don't know anything about the murders or the case against Aileen. All I know is that Aileen was pretty wacky, and Nick Broomfield is a poor documentarian.