Alamar (To the Sea) Reviews

  • Jan 04, 2021

    Alamar is an odd film by any standard, but what is oddest about it is the fact that it is totally captivating for no explicable reason. A young boy, who will be leaving with his mother for a new life in Italy, spends time with his father at Banco Chinchorro, a remote atoll off the coast of Mexico. They spend their days fishing, swimming, boating, and enjoying the short time they have remaining together as father and son. Director Pedro Gonzalez-Rubio is totally objective throughout, passing no judgement regarding the father's lifestyle, and effectively captures the depth of the relationship between the two characters. While not for all tastes, it is a moving film and a daring experiment.

    Alamar is an odd film by any standard, but what is oddest about it is the fact that it is totally captivating for no explicable reason. A young boy, who will be leaving with his mother for a new life in Italy, spends time with his father at Banco Chinchorro, a remote atoll off the coast of Mexico. They spend their days fishing, swimming, boating, and enjoying the short time they have remaining together as father and son. Director Pedro Gonzalez-Rubio is totally objective throughout, passing no judgement regarding the father's lifestyle, and effectively captures the depth of the relationship between the two characters. While not for all tastes, it is a moving film and a daring experiment.

  • Mar 23, 2018

    I enjoyed this film immensely. It is a very beautiful film, but which never seems to be overly sentimental. The documentary-style is cleverly executed, and the gentle contemplation of the father-son relationship is touching.

    I enjoyed this film immensely. It is a very beautiful film, but which never seems to be overly sentimental. The documentary-style is cleverly executed, and the gentle contemplation of the father-son relationship is touching.

  • Nov 14, 2014

    Beautiful, gentle people. Wonderful life they live. How sad for the child to be taken from there to live in the "real" world.

    Beautiful, gentle people. Wonderful life they live. How sad for the child to be taken from there to live in the "real" world.

  • Jun 06, 2014

    Even though this is a very simple film I enjoyed it very much.

    Even though this is a very simple film I enjoyed it very much.

  • Apr 28, 2014

    This is a very different kind of documentary from the ones I usually watch. It was very simple yet very 'warm' and touching.

    This is a very different kind of documentary from the ones I usually watch. It was very simple yet very 'warm' and touching.

  • Jun 04, 2013

    Superb documentary movie. Such a surreal and calming feel with a movie is unique. Loved the characters and acting, and the special appearance by 'Blanquita' . Enchanted. Watch it.

    Superb documentary movie. Such a surreal and calming feel with a movie is unique. Loved the characters and acting, and the special appearance by 'Blanquita' . Enchanted. Watch it.

  • Jun 02, 2013

    A beautiful film about a father teaching his son how to survive on the bumpy sea that is life. Alamar is a masterpiece in every sense of the word, a masterpiece of cinematographry, narrative, directing, and acting.

    A beautiful film about a father teaching his son how to survive on the bumpy sea that is life. Alamar is a masterpiece in every sense of the word, a masterpiece of cinematographry, narrative, directing, and acting.

  • Jun 01, 2013

    Es increíble lo mucho que dice "Alamar" diciendo tan poco. La cinta tiene una sencilla premisa y se enfoca enteramente en invitarnos a experimentar la vida de una familia de pescadores (el hijo visita a su padre de Italia, donde vive con su madre). No hay drama ni artificios, es solo una mirada hermosa y profunda (la cual es tan realista que la cinta se siente improvisada, casi como un documental). "Alamar" es una joya de película, genuina, honesta y maravillosamente filmada. Es el tipo de propuesta que vemos raramente en el cine mexicano pero que, sin duda, inspira. Muy recomendable.

    Es increíble lo mucho que dice "Alamar" diciendo tan poco. La cinta tiene una sencilla premisa y se enfoca enteramente en invitarnos a experimentar la vida de una familia de pescadores (el hijo visita a su padre de Italia, donde vive con su madre). No hay drama ni artificios, es solo una mirada hermosa y profunda (la cual es tan realista que la cinta se siente improvisada, casi como un documental). "Alamar" es una joya de película, genuina, honesta y maravillosamente filmada. Es el tipo de propuesta que vemos raramente en el cine mexicano pero que, sin duda, inspira. Muy recomendable.

  • May 16, 2013

    Alamar is a peaceful film that brings with it important, subtle messages about the difference between the city life and the one in nature. modern perspectives on the upbringing of children and their surrounding environments, and the beauty of the planet of which we, unfortunately, too often ignore.

    Alamar is a peaceful film that brings with it important, subtle messages about the difference between the city life and the one in nature. modern perspectives on the upbringing of children and their surrounding environments, and the beauty of the planet of which we, unfortunately, too often ignore.

  • Jan 08, 2013

    What Alamar lacks in formal narrative structure it makes up for in soft visual and emotional beauty. A modest film with bittersweet notes of love and separation, the film follows the final day spent on the sea between a man and his son in the waning Mexican summer before the boy returns to his mother in Italy. First time director Pedro González-Rubio makes good on his cinematography background as he follows the pair with unassuming gentleness, shooting the film stylistically as a mix of documentary and narrative. I am not clear to what degree it is either, but the loving nature of the filmmaking makes it work in either case as a wonderful portrait of parenting. And at a meager 73 minutes, the visual poetry is never made to feel inflated or the sparse dialogue trying.

    What Alamar lacks in formal narrative structure it makes up for in soft visual and emotional beauty. A modest film with bittersweet notes of love and separation, the film follows the final day spent on the sea between a man and his son in the waning Mexican summer before the boy returns to his mother in Italy. First time director Pedro González-Rubio makes good on his cinematography background as he follows the pair with unassuming gentleness, shooting the film stylistically as a mix of documentary and narrative. I am not clear to what degree it is either, but the loving nature of the filmmaking makes it work in either case as a wonderful portrait of parenting. And at a meager 73 minutes, the visual poetry is never made to feel inflated or the sparse dialogue trying.