All the Money in the World Reviews

  • 6d ago

    It's longer than it needs to be. The suspense builds up well, as Ridley Scott has a way of doing. The ending is a bit anticlimactic, in my opinion. I'm guessing that was the real-life ending but it doesn't make for the most interesting story. The first half is rather slow. Second half is a better pace. Overall, it's just okay.

    It's longer than it needs to be. The suspense builds up well, as Ridley Scott has a way of doing. The ending is a bit anticlimactic, in my opinion. I'm guessing that was the real-life ending but it doesn't make for the most interesting story. The first half is rather slow. Second half is a better pace. Overall, it's just okay.

  • May 13, 2020

    The movie goes on way too long. We get it. J. Paul Getty was a very rich, cheap, narcissistic, sociopath. So much time is spent hammering this home that much of the rest of the true story is either missing or rushed to fit it in. That being said, Christopher and Charlie Plummers' performances are very god, as is Michelle Williams as the mother. Mark Wahlberg is acceptable, but the part could have been played better by others. The sets are visually stunning and play a character themselves, representing pure opulence.

    The movie goes on way too long. We get it. J. Paul Getty was a very rich, cheap, narcissistic, sociopath. So much time is spent hammering this home that much of the rest of the true story is either missing or rushed to fit it in. That being said, Christopher and Charlie Plummers' performances are very god, as is Michelle Williams as the mother. Mark Wahlberg is acceptable, but the part could have been played better by others. The sets are visually stunning and play a character themselves, representing pure opulence.

  • Apr 12, 2020

    Inspired by true events, the worlds wealthiest man's grandson is kidnapped & the film is a fight to get him back. This film was 2 hours long that easily could have been dropped down to 90-105 minutes. Wahlberg, Williams & both Plummer's were good but it could have been cut significantly.

    Inspired by true events, the worlds wealthiest man's grandson is kidnapped & the film is a fight to get him back. This film was 2 hours long that easily could have been dropped down to 90-105 minutes. Wahlberg, Williams & both Plummer's were good but it could have been cut significantly.

  • Feb 10, 2020

    Darius Khondji's superb use of colour and light give a cleanly cut, layered, complex and crisp image with a delightfully retro vibe. Ridley Scott, even on autopilot shines, in fact, far from the world builder he once was, he seems to flourish with the standard drama with a finished script these days and not the run and gun, improv of the big franchise property. Contrary to my previous point, he has done an excellent job of reshooting and inserting Plummer in to the film, Plummer bringing an undeniable presence and energy to the film. All The Money In The World is an evenly paced, exciting, and well written historical drama. It's a shame it was slightly mismarketed, but it sits well when watched at home after a hard days work.

    Darius Khondji's superb use of colour and light give a cleanly cut, layered, complex and crisp image with a delightfully retro vibe. Ridley Scott, even on autopilot shines, in fact, far from the world builder he once was, he seems to flourish with the standard drama with a finished script these days and not the run and gun, improv of the big franchise property. Contrary to my previous point, he has done an excellent job of reshooting and inserting Plummer in to the film, Plummer bringing an undeniable presence and energy to the film. All The Money In The World is an evenly paced, exciting, and well written historical drama. It's a shame it was slightly mismarketed, but it sits well when watched at home after a hard days work.

  • Feb 09, 2020

    The cast in this film was so great, and did an amazing job! Christopher Plummer was fantastic!

    The cast in this film was so great, and did an amazing job! Christopher Plummer was fantastic!

  • Feb 06, 2020

    I had two issues with this movie. I didn't really care about the kidnapping or what happened to Paul. And I thought Mark Wahlberg was miscast. It's hard to imagine Kevin Spacey in the role that eventually went to Christopher Plummer (for one thing, Spacey isn't nearly old enough). I didn't think we ever found out enough about the kidnappers to figure out why they did it. It had some tense moments near the end but overall I wasn't really into it.

    I had two issues with this movie. I didn't really care about the kidnapping or what happened to Paul. And I thought Mark Wahlberg was miscast. It's hard to imagine Kevin Spacey in the role that eventually went to Christopher Plummer (for one thing, Spacey isn't nearly old enough). I didn't think we ever found out enough about the kidnappers to figure out why they did it. It had some tense moments near the end but overall I wasn't really into it.

  • Jan 01, 2020

    A cautionary tale about the dangers of living in a rich family. It's a well directed and well acted movie. The story was predictable and I wasn't surprised by anything.

    A cautionary tale about the dangers of living in a rich family. It's a well directed and well acted movie. The story was predictable and I wasn't surprised by anything.

  • Dec 20, 2019

    A film that was in many ways overshadowed by the various controversies that swirled around it from the sexual harassment allegations against Kevin Spacey to the disparity in pay between Mark Wahlberg and Michelle Williams it was a pleasant surprise to discover that this is a good film. There are elements that feel off in it that are mostly related to the writing of the Fletcher Chase character and the miscasting of Mark Wahlberg in the role as whenever he appears on screen the film is weighed down. He is not enough to completely ruin the film however as the character of John Paul Getty Sr. is fascinating and while the idea that wealth corrupts is not anything new the film deals with it quite well. John Paul Getty Sr., Christopher Plummer, is said to be the wealthiest man ever but remains frugal in old age as he invests more in artwork than he does in his family members. His estranged son John Paul Getty Jr., Andrew Buchanan, is welcomed back into the fold and his lower class wife Gail, Michelle Williams, is concerned about the impact that his Getty Sr.'s miserly behavior will have on their son John Paul Getty III, Charlie Plummer. With the divorce between Gail and Getty Jr. he descends into drug addiction and she must raise her children with little money due to a strange divorce settlement. In 1973 a teenage Getty III is kidnapped by Italian terrorists and his initial ransom is seventeen million dollars but Getty Sr. refuses to pay anything for fear of his other grandchildren being kidnapped. His negotiator Fletcher Chase, Mark Wahlberg, attempts to help Gail track down her son but he finds himself in conflict with his employer as increasingly violent acts are inflicted upon his grandson. The reason that we are simultaneously horrified and attracted to Getty Sr. is that on the one hand he is a monster to everyone in his family and on the other he is better than all of them because he has some purpose in life. His desire to maintain his wealth and not fritter it all away on model wives and drugs is in some ways admirable as the issue with many wealthy dynasties, including the Vanderbilts, is that the children of those who earned a lot of money do not know how to do anything except spend money. His life is also sad and lonely as while he is successful and stubbornly holds on to his values there is no real benefit to be gained from it as he ends up alone and unhappy. Even though he claims to love his grandson it is clear that he loves his money more and the emptiness of his life, even as it is glamorous, is clear at it's end as there is nobody left who will remember him fondly and continue his legacy. Other ideas that the film touches upon that are fascinating is that children of immense wealth who would seem to have every opportunity can often be self sabotaging because they have nothing to work for and will get away with everything. These children who have been raised in the lap of luxury have the desire to take up radical political ideals and hang out with rock stars to escape the confines of the square lifestyle they have been raised in but at the end of the day it is all champagne socialism. When Getty III is kidnapped it is initially believed that he may have orchestrated the event with some friends he met when he walked on the wild side and looking at the naïve, arrogant young man it is easy to see how he could have made this decision. He does not appreciate that he needs money to have education enough to understand the political beliefs that they take on. Without capitalism he would not be living in Rome and his excitement at his father's damaging lifestyle shows that he still had a lot of maturing to do. It would have been interesting to see more of the relationship between father and son but the film is more invested in the vague espionage plotting carried out by Chase. Speaking of Chase I must note that Wahlberg seems incongruent with the rest of the film playing one of those irritating characters who is always right all of the time. This is not the right role for Wahlberg as his arrogant smugness is best put to use when he plays characters who do make mistakes and are embarrassed in front of others. He is out of his depth next to a fine actress like Williams who is detail oriented enough to show Gail's accent changing depending on whose company she is in. Plummer is the star attraction of the film and he takes a big, showy role and makes the best of it as he uses his gravitas and stature to suggest a great power while concealing his character's feelings of loneliness. Most of the cast is superb and that makes the film more than a by the numbers kidnapping thriller.

    A film that was in many ways overshadowed by the various controversies that swirled around it from the sexual harassment allegations against Kevin Spacey to the disparity in pay between Mark Wahlberg and Michelle Williams it was a pleasant surprise to discover that this is a good film. There are elements that feel off in it that are mostly related to the writing of the Fletcher Chase character and the miscasting of Mark Wahlberg in the role as whenever he appears on screen the film is weighed down. He is not enough to completely ruin the film however as the character of John Paul Getty Sr. is fascinating and while the idea that wealth corrupts is not anything new the film deals with it quite well. John Paul Getty Sr., Christopher Plummer, is said to be the wealthiest man ever but remains frugal in old age as he invests more in artwork than he does in his family members. His estranged son John Paul Getty Jr., Andrew Buchanan, is welcomed back into the fold and his lower class wife Gail, Michelle Williams, is concerned about the impact that his Getty Sr.'s miserly behavior will have on their son John Paul Getty III, Charlie Plummer. With the divorce between Gail and Getty Jr. he descends into drug addiction and she must raise her children with little money due to a strange divorce settlement. In 1973 a teenage Getty III is kidnapped by Italian terrorists and his initial ransom is seventeen million dollars but Getty Sr. refuses to pay anything for fear of his other grandchildren being kidnapped. His negotiator Fletcher Chase, Mark Wahlberg, attempts to help Gail track down her son but he finds himself in conflict with his employer as increasingly violent acts are inflicted upon his grandson. The reason that we are simultaneously horrified and attracted to Getty Sr. is that on the one hand he is a monster to everyone in his family and on the other he is better than all of them because he has some purpose in life. His desire to maintain his wealth and not fritter it all away on model wives and drugs is in some ways admirable as the issue with many wealthy dynasties, including the Vanderbilts, is that the children of those who earned a lot of money do not know how to do anything except spend money. His life is also sad and lonely as while he is successful and stubbornly holds on to his values there is no real benefit to be gained from it as he ends up alone and unhappy. Even though he claims to love his grandson it is clear that he loves his money more and the emptiness of his life, even as it is glamorous, is clear at it's end as there is nobody left who will remember him fondly and continue his legacy. Other ideas that the film touches upon that are fascinating is that children of immense wealth who would seem to have every opportunity can often be self sabotaging because they have nothing to work for and will get away with everything. These children who have been raised in the lap of luxury have the desire to take up radical political ideals and hang out with rock stars to escape the confines of the square lifestyle they have been raised in but at the end of the day it is all champagne socialism. When Getty III is kidnapped it is initially believed that he may have orchestrated the event with some friends he met when he walked on the wild side and looking at the naïve, arrogant young man it is easy to see how he could have made this decision. He does not appreciate that he needs money to have education enough to understand the political beliefs that they take on. Without capitalism he would not be living in Rome and his excitement at his father's damaging lifestyle shows that he still had a lot of maturing to do. It would have been interesting to see more of the relationship between father and son but the film is more invested in the vague espionage plotting carried out by Chase. Speaking of Chase I must note that Wahlberg seems incongruent with the rest of the film playing one of those irritating characters who is always right all of the time. This is not the right role for Wahlberg as his arrogant smugness is best put to use when he plays characters who do make mistakes and are embarrassed in front of others. He is out of his depth next to a fine actress like Williams who is detail oriented enough to show Gail's accent changing depending on whose company she is in. Plummer is the star attraction of the film and he takes a big, showy role and makes the best of it as he uses his gravitas and stature to suggest a great power while concealing his character's feelings of loneliness. Most of the cast is superb and that makes the film more than a by the numbers kidnapping thriller.

  • Dec 14, 2019

    The dialogue was top notch along with the acting and the plot. One of my favorite movies from that year

    The dialogue was top notch along with the acting and the plot. One of my favorite movies from that year

  • Dec 08, 2019

    Who needs Spacey when you have Plummer.

    Who needs Spacey when you have Plummer.