And Now the Screaming Starts - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

And Now the Screaming Starts Reviews

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November 2, 2015
Early 1970s UK horror from Amicus productions who were more known for their horror anthology films such as Asylum and The Beast Must Die.
Here the film isn't an anthology but a straight horror cum period drama.
Set in the 18th Century this film focuses on a rich family haunted by demons from the family past some fifty years prior.
The demons involve graphic scenes of rape and limb dismemberment resulting in a severed hand cropping up in several scenes involving the supposed madness of Stephanie Beacham's character Catherine Fengriffin.
However after a good hour we find she isn't mad at all but the victim of a vendetta resulting from the barbaric acts of her newly related ancestor grandfather (Herbert Lom as Henry Fengriffin).
Peter Cushing makes a brief appearance as surprise, surprise a doctor.
Cushing (the legend that he is) gets top billing for a few minutes appearance in the film that could have been filmed in a day.
The film is slow moving until the story of the Fengriffin family unravels in the final act.
The credits at the beginning reveal the story is based on a book Fengriffin. One wonders if is in print?
The review of Cushing work goes on.
October 2, 2013
A Slow Moving Atmospheric Amicus Horror, That's More Adult Orientated Than Some Of Their Other Big Films. Its A Tale About, Rape, Revenge, Virgins & Ghosts In A Seemingly Hauted House. This Is A Film That Works With Its Somewhat Basic Story, Clever Atmosphere & It's Good Performances From Its Cast
June 26, 2013
A good cast in a Hammeresque style gothic horror. It's creepy enough but lacks a satisfying ending.
April 26, 2012
One of the rare non-anthology offerings from Amicus, this one is pretty much a bore, despite the admirably out-there premise. Still, watching genre veterans like Lom, Magee, and Cushing chew a little scenery is never a bad thing; too bad they're stuck in such a forgettable film.
April 24, 2012
Produced by Amicus Productions and directed by the ever reliable Roy Ward Baker (A Night to Remember (1958), The Vampire Lovers (1970), Scars of Dracula (1970) and Dr. Jekyll and Sister Hyde (1971)), this is a complex but effective horror film with a good cast, but it does get a bit complex for it's own good, which tends to work against it. Set in rural England in 1795, it starts when young Charles Fengriffen (Ian Ogilvy) marries Catherine (Stephanie Beacham), and they settle down in the family home, but when Catherine becomes obsessed with a painting that has a mysterious, hypnotic quality about it, she starts seeing things, like a dismembered hand crawling across the floor, and on the wedding night, Catherine is sexually assaulted by some unknown entity. When the hallucinations get worse, Charles turns to Dr. Whittle (Patrick Magee), who is at a loss what to do, but he calls in psychologist Dr. Pope (Peter Cushing), who learns the horrible truth about Charles' grandfather Henry (Herbert Lom), and the curse a woodsman called Silas (Geoffrey Whitehead) put upon the name of Fengriffen. It's got it's good moments of bloody scares and what you'd expect from a 70's horror film, it's got good costumes and sets too, and it manages to do a lot with not a lot of money. A bit of work could have gone into the script mind, as it does seem a bit confused and muddled at the end, which feels a bit silly.
Super Reviewer
½ April 23, 2012
Rather than the portmanteau films that Amicus were known for in the early 70's here they try to ape Hammer and create their own gothic horror. Unfortunately there is little that is actually horrific here aside from a few shock moments and the whole thing feels a bit laboured. The cast are pretty strong and do their best with the material but you kind of wish the whole thing had been compresses into a short story and thrown into another portmanteau film. I think I'll stick with 'Asylum' and 'Vault of Horror' in the future.
½ April 16, 2012
Stephanie Beecham, can't look at her without thinking of bad girls now haha. This was utter crap, it got a star for Stephanie and a half star for the funny severed hand!
April 15, 2012
Whilst this Amicus horror is slightly rough around the edges, the plot is quite good and some scenes are actually quite scary.
½ April 8, 2012
It was decent but i prefer the Amicus anthology flicks. This could have easily been shortened down and inserted into one of those films.
March 3, 2012
Catherine (Stephanie Beacham) the new blushing bride of Charles Fengriffen (Ian Ogilvy) comes to live at his old family estate. On their first night together a family curse rears it's ugly head when a ghost rapes and impregnates her. Dr. Pope (Peter Cushing) is brought into the mix to figure the mess and solve the riddle of the curse.

This is a solid tale from Amicus Studios. The acting is on par with this type of movie, slightly over the top and hammy but that's to be expected for this fare. While the production value is close to the grand ones of Hammer Studios (the competitor studio in England during the 60's and 70's) the movie lacks the lovely atmosphere of the Gothic Hammer films. This is a low-budget production (as usual), supported by an interesting low-paced story, and is great for fans like me of British horror movies of the 70's.
July 5, 2011
Weird movie. I struggled watching this movie. The only part I liked was when he tells the legend to Dr. Pope. Wouldn't watch it again though unless there was absolutely nothing else.
April 12, 2011
Catherine (Stephanie Beacham) the new blushing bride of Charles Fengriffen (Ian Ogilvy) comes to live at his old family estate. On their first night together a family curse rears it's ugly head when a ghost rapes and impregnates her. Dr. Pope (Peter Cushing) is brought into the mix to figure the mess and solve the riddle of the curse.

This is a solid tale from Amicus Studios. The acting is on par with this type of movie, slightly over the top and hammy but that's to be expected for this fare. While the production value is close to the grand ones of Hammer Studios (the competitor studio in England during the 60's and 70's) the movie lacks the lovely atmosphere of the Gothic Hammer films. This is a low-budget production (as usual), supported by an interesting low-paced story, and is great for fans like me of British horror movies of the 70's.
October 15, 2010
This popped up again from the To-Watch Pile and I can happily say that it holds up really well. Great looking film, great sets, nice atmosphere.

Nicely atmospheric ghost story that I have to admit I dozed through a short portion of. I enjoyed the film and I think the dozing reflected how tired I was and not necessarily the quality of the film.

Well worth a look, give it a rental.
August 11, 2010
Another fun film from Amicus after their omnibus horror stage. Essentially a haunted house film, And Now The Screaming Starts separates itself from the general fare by featuring ghostly rapes, monstrous births, torturous flashbacks, and a crawling severed hand that pops up in almost every location. The film feels like a typical historical horror piece from Hammer, but it features some surprisingly brutal elements. If you are a fan of Hammer or other Amicus films, then And Now the Screaming Starts is definitely worth checking out.
January 4, 2010
It was entertaining, but not the best.
November 25, 2009
Another fun film from Amicus after their omnibus horror stage. Essentially a haunted house film, And Now The Screaming Starts separates itself from the general fare by featuring ghostly rapes, monstrous births, torturous flashbacks, and a crawling severed hand that pops up in almost every location. The film feels like a typical historical horror piece from Hammer, but it features some surprisingly brutal elements. If you are a fan of Hammer or other Amicus films, then And Now the Screaming Starts is definitely worth checking out.
½ October 23, 2009
Slow moving Haunted house tale here, that has some jolts here and there, but generally creaks along with the house. Ian Oglivy stars as the husband, and Peter Cushing comes along later to provide help with whatever is ailing them, they're both pretty good, but Stephanie Beachem just chews up the scenery mostly. Great title, somewhat boring story.
½ September 8, 2009
I'm a great fan of Peter Cushing and the horror genre, and when I saw this title, I knew I had to watch it. "And Now the Screaming Starts" may not be highly original or even inspired in terms of the plot, but what it lacks it makes up for in a rich and lush Gothic atmosphere and a lead actress that is beautiful and credibly haunting in her performance. Stephanie Beacham plays Catherine Fengriffen, a virginal bride who accompanies her new husband, Charles Fengriffen [Ian Ogilvy] to his ancestral home in the countryside. Their first night there marks the start of the Catherine's nightmare as she sees horrific visions and is later assaulted on her wedding night by a spectral hand and an unseen entity. Her husband dismisses Catherine's visions as a trick of the mind and nerves, and when Catherine later finds herself pregnant, she begins to become even more concerned about the state of her sanity. Catherine begins digging deeper into the history of the home, especially concerning Charles' grandfather Henry [Herbert Lom] whose menacing portrait leers at her in the hallway. Then there's the mystery of the disfigured woodsman Silas [Geoffrey Whitehead] who does not really serve any purpose yet has ownership of his own plot of land and shack on the family estate.

I found the first half plodding as it takes a while for the story to get moving, and it is only in the second half that the action actually picks up, especially with the arrival of Peter Cushing who plays a prominent psychologist, Dr Pope. Initially Pope thinks Catherine's problems are purely in the mind, but later finds his cynicism challenged by mysterious deaths and happenings. The highlight performances in this movie are Cushing's and Beacham's. The plot and dialogue are average, but what makes this a memorable viewing experience is the highly atmospheric setting and the ancestral manor which is quite amazing. The special effects are rather cheesy given this is a 70s movie, yet I felt entertained and absorbed in the story as I lost myself in the Gothic-inspired plot and settings. Recommended for fans of the genre.
Super Reviewer
½ May 3, 2009
Odd film, this. Not being the biggest fan of Hammer, I always felt Amicus a more competent stable (neither really produced a film that was actually frightening, but they could be entertaining, and Amicus were glossy and lurid.) This one is a little-known piece that always gets bad reviews but I happen to like it. Firstly, it has a splendid cast. Secondly, the camerawork is something to behold, the sickly lurid colours blending in with the gorgeous period costumes and attractive, dramatic locations. There is also a little more going on here than meets the eye. Perhaps a subtle nod to the Glamis Castle story...? There's a little bit of class war going on, and despite its vivid rape scene I can't help feeling this isn't quite the exploitation movie it appears. For an early 70s movie it does at least treat the issue seriously; the effect it has on the victim and the fact that no measures can atone for it are believable.

A word to the excellent music, beautiful but interspersed with a spooky zither. And Geoffrey Whitehead is very good. The graveyard climax is pretty powerful too, and the closing shot as a camera wanders an empty room to the Bible is a cut above what one expects from this genre. The bad points are the tacky severed hand, the occasional Grand Guignol hamminess and the fact that the film does rather overplay it's hand...it spends so long building up to its revelation that by then it will always be a let down.

And one other criticism...Catherine recovers from her wedding night ordeal ridiculously quickly, which totally contradicts the film's central premise. Still, the open window symbolism and the Malleus Mallificarum references are neat, as is the wonderful scene of Charles standing by the window as the snow falls and reading the lines from Milton's Comus. This film honestly isn't as bad as you may think and you could certainly do alot worse on a dark winter evening!
May 2, 2009
got to see the second half and liked it, definetly want to see it again from the begining
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