Anna Reviews

June 24, 2019
[Besson is] riffing on spy movies and their inherent double crosses and triple crosses, stopping just short of parody but letting the audience in on the trick. And thanks to Besson and a willing cast, the trick's a pretty good one.
June 21, 2019
What ultimately sinks the film is its overwhelming blandness, from the lack of creativity employed in Anna's many kills to Besson's inability to choreograph a pulse-racing action scene...
June 21, 2019
But unlike Besson's bugnuts, energetically dopey Scarlett Johansson vehicle Lucy, Anna is more invested in winking at the audience than being fun.
June 21, 2019
Watching Anna brings with it a profound sense of déjà vu. If only anything else about it was profound.
June 21, 2019
The gunplay in Anna grows repetitive before long, and the heroine's invincibility feels like a cheap substitute for the power that Besson wields over her.
June 21, 2019
Over and over, the film proceeds down one narrative path, then jumps back as each twist reveals a new, hidden thread. Besson keeps the story and action clear while deftly slipping in minor details that prove crucial later on.
June 21, 2019
Besson is the same filmmaker now that he was 20 years ago, and unlike his title character, who lithely adapts to whatever situation she's in, he's been telling roughly the same story over and over all this time. The thing is, he's great at it...
June 21, 2019
Even long-standing fans of [Besson's] will find it hard to muster much enthusiasm for this startlingly lazy bit of by-the-numbers hackwork.
June 21, 2019
The film falters when it tries to be an aspirational tale, about a woman tired of being shuffled from one "grey box" to another, and who's exhausted by the piggish fashion photographers and demanding spy-masters who dominate her days.
June 21, 2019
This assassin shoots blanks.
June 20, 2019
Luss convincingly channels... brutal determination. All those years of being in the cutthroat world of real-life modelling have served her well.
June 20, 2019
Luss's uncompelling character elicits no empathy - except when she cries to be free, which is something trapped, yawning audiences will surely understand.