Arkansas Reviews

  • Mar 24, 2021

    Very underrated movie

    Very underrated movie

  • Mar 07, 2021

    Excellente movie. Excellent performances, very good script, good plot, good thriller, it doesn't need a lot of special effects or a big budget to be entertaining. the movie catch you from start to finish.

    Excellente movie. Excellent performances, very good script, good plot, good thriller, it doesn't need a lot of special effects or a big budget to be entertaining. the movie catch you from start to finish.

  • Jan 28, 2021

    Good cool southern movie.

    Good cool southern movie.

  • Jan 15, 2021

    Getting into the business. So this is about big-time drug dealers in Arkansas. There is a hierarchy in the occupation, and at the top of the pyramid is a man named Frog (Vince Vaughn). Two up-and-comers (Liam Hemsworth, Clark Duke) are starting to prove themselves, but they have yet to meet the man in charge. This story is about how they get pulled deeper into the business. Now I love a crime story about criminals that are less than intelligent. The South makes a perfect setting for this, and it was already expertly handled in The Death of Dick Long. I hadn't heard any great word of mouth on this, but I still wanted to give it a shot. I feel like this movie showed potential, but it never quite came together for me. Arkansas is the feature-length debut from Clark Duke. If you don't recognize the name, he is better known for his work in Hot Tub Time Machine and the last season of U.S. The Office. To speak kindly, I think he does show some promise as a director. I like his choice of camera shots and angles in this, and I would like to see him helm more films. That said, I don't think that he needs to star in anything else he directs. That was a negative on my scorecard. His partner as played by Liam Hemsworth comes away from this looking the best, but for Duke, it was just an odd character choice to wear sunglasses for 80% of this movie. It was honestly distracting for me, and I don't know if he was trying to give himself more confidence, but it didn't work. There are some bigger name actors in this. I already mentioned Vince Vaughn, but you've also got John Malkovich, Michael Kenneth Williams, and Vivica A. Fox. They're all okay, but it's nothing you're going to remember after the fact. This story is divvied up into five chapters, and I feel like it disjoints the story too much. Characters will drop out between segments, and because there are several flashbacks on top of that, the movie never establishes flow. I think this would stand a better chance of succeeding as a miniseries; if they gave this the Fargo treatment, I could see this working, but I think it is safe to say that will never happen. I was never bored with Arkansas, but it never rises to be greater than the sum of its parts. I'm going to mostly forget about this because it isn't all that memorable, and I'm sure if I ever cross paths with this movie later down the line, I will foggily ask myself, "did I watch this?" This is an okay movie, but frankly speaking, there are much better movies that you can be watching.

    Getting into the business. So this is about big-time drug dealers in Arkansas. There is a hierarchy in the occupation, and at the top of the pyramid is a man named Frog (Vince Vaughn). Two up-and-comers (Liam Hemsworth, Clark Duke) are starting to prove themselves, but they have yet to meet the man in charge. This story is about how they get pulled deeper into the business. Now I love a crime story about criminals that are less than intelligent. The South makes a perfect setting for this, and it was already expertly handled in The Death of Dick Long. I hadn't heard any great word of mouth on this, but I still wanted to give it a shot. I feel like this movie showed potential, but it never quite came together for me. Arkansas is the feature-length debut from Clark Duke. If you don't recognize the name, he is better known for his work in Hot Tub Time Machine and the last season of U.S. The Office. To speak kindly, I think he does show some promise as a director. I like his choice of camera shots and angles in this, and I would like to see him helm more films. That said, I don't think that he needs to star in anything else he directs. That was a negative on my scorecard. His partner as played by Liam Hemsworth comes away from this looking the best, but for Duke, it was just an odd character choice to wear sunglasses for 80% of this movie. It was honestly distracting for me, and I don't know if he was trying to give himself more confidence, but it didn't work. There are some bigger name actors in this. I already mentioned Vince Vaughn, but you've also got John Malkovich, Michael Kenneth Williams, and Vivica A. Fox. They're all okay, but it's nothing you're going to remember after the fact. This story is divvied up into five chapters, and I feel like it disjoints the story too much. Characters will drop out between segments, and because there are several flashbacks on top of that, the movie never establishes flow. I think this would stand a better chance of succeeding as a miniseries; if they gave this the Fargo treatment, I could see this working, but I think it is safe to say that will never happen. I was never bored with Arkansas, but it never rises to be greater than the sum of its parts. I'm going to mostly forget about this because it isn't all that memorable, and I'm sure if I ever cross paths with this movie later down the line, I will foggily ask myself, "did I watch this?" This is an okay movie, but frankly speaking, there are much better movies that you can be watching.

  • Dec 31, 2020

    Maybe the worst movie I've watched to the end in years. The film has no hope from the beginning with Clark Duke's idiotic character. You know it as soon as he's introduced. The movie is ruined at that point ! And to describe it as neo-noir is like describing "Lady and the Tramp' as a 'sultry lustful affair'. Anyone involved in this film should be embarrassed.

    Maybe the worst movie I've watched to the end in years. The film has no hope from the beginning with Clark Duke's idiotic character. You know it as soon as he's introduced. The movie is ruined at that point ! And to describe it as neo-noir is like describing "Lady and the Tramp' as a 'sultry lustful affair'. Anyone involved in this film should be embarrassed.

  • Dec 26, 2020

    Good movie - lots of action

    Good movie - lots of action

  • Nov 25, 2020

    I loved it! Such a cool, interesting movie! Good story and good acting, that's really what makes a good movie.

    I loved it! Such a cool, interesting movie! Good story and good acting, that's really what makes a good movie.

  • Nov 21, 2020

    found myself picking my phone up in quite a few places - I never did that when I first watched The Usual Suspects.. but then I didn't have a phone

    found myself picking my phone up in quite a few places - I never did that when I first watched The Usual Suspects.. but then I didn't have a phone

  • Nov 20, 2020

    Absolute garbage. Very disappointed great way to butcher a decent cast.

    Absolute garbage. Very disappointed great way to butcher a decent cast.

  • Nov 18, 2020

    Based on John Brandon's novel, actor-turned-director, Clark Duke's (The Office US) debut feature is a Tarantino-esque Dixie American noir that's inhabited by characters who have migrated over from an early Coen Brothers movie. The story thrives in random, perhaps contrived if one's cynically inclined, narrative twists and developments, that propel the film in ways that feels outlandish and slightly odd – but once you get into its rhythm, and seasoned film-goers will as it is a somewhat familiar one, its kookiness becomes somewhat less surprising and impactful. There's a two prong approach here, one centres on the lower end of the criminal syndicate with Liam Hemsworth's handsome but stoic Kyle and Clark's Swin, whose offbeat name pretty much defines his entire character, who find themselves working under John Malkovich's Ranger Bright (another bizarre creation that only he can get away with); and the other prong flashes back to chart the beginnings of their boss, the mysteriously named Frog, and how all the various borderline-whimsical characters' paths finally cross each other at the film's climax. The chaptering structure and the frequent use of voice-overs belie the difficulty it has shaking its literary origins and can feel like watching an audio-book at times; but despite its derivativeness and characters that may have mistaken eccentricity for characterisation, there is something intriguing enough here that kept my engagement. It's nicely put together and the witty and assured screenplay thankfully resisted the temptation to pander to its audience by sticking to a more credible but bittersweet ending – which is basically me saying that I kinda enjoyed this silly B-movie despite everything.

    Based on John Brandon's novel, actor-turned-director, Clark Duke's (The Office US) debut feature is a Tarantino-esque Dixie American noir that's inhabited by characters who have migrated over from an early Coen Brothers movie. The story thrives in random, perhaps contrived if one's cynically inclined, narrative twists and developments, that propel the film in ways that feels outlandish and slightly odd – but once you get into its rhythm, and seasoned film-goers will as it is a somewhat familiar one, its kookiness becomes somewhat less surprising and impactful. There's a two prong approach here, one centres on the lower end of the criminal syndicate with Liam Hemsworth's handsome but stoic Kyle and Clark's Swin, whose offbeat name pretty much defines his entire character, who find themselves working under John Malkovich's Ranger Bright (another bizarre creation that only he can get away with); and the other prong flashes back to chart the beginnings of their boss, the mysteriously named Frog, and how all the various borderline-whimsical characters' paths finally cross each other at the film's climax. The chaptering structure and the frequent use of voice-overs belie the difficulty it has shaking its literary origins and can feel like watching an audio-book at times; but despite its derivativeness and characters that may have mistaken eccentricity for characterisation, there is something intriguing enough here that kept my engagement. It's nicely put together and the witty and assured screenplay thankfully resisted the temptation to pander to its audience by sticking to a more credible but bittersweet ending – which is basically me saying that I kinda enjoyed this silly B-movie despite everything.