Reviews

  • Apr 13, 2009

    This documentary about the filmmaker Marjan Tehrani’s Iranian-born brother and American-born wife returning to Iran for a traditional wedding was itself nicely shot and structured. As a travelogue, it even had me wanting to travel to Iran. The brother and groom, Alex, left me a little cold though. He seemed to relish in the exotic nature of Iran, as if it were little more than a nice locale for a gritty photo shoot. While there was justified criticism of Bush and American foreign policy, there was little criticism of the misogynistic government and Islamic religion (of which the bride is forced to convert in order to travel). On the topic of head scarves, the bride Heather at least sheepishly insinuates that the garment is oppressive. All her new husband can say is that she looks sexy in it. Eck. Both Alex and his filmmaker sister seemed complicit in the misogyny and oppression through their jaw-gaped admiration of Iran. At least, Marjan Tehrani could hide behind a well-placed camera.

    This documentary about the filmmaker Marjan Tehrani’s Iranian-born brother and American-born wife returning to Iran for a traditional wedding was itself nicely shot and structured. As a travelogue, it even had me wanting to travel to Iran. The brother and groom, Alex, left me a little cold though. He seemed to relish in the exotic nature of Iran, as if it were little more than a nice locale for a gritty photo shoot. While there was justified criticism of Bush and American foreign policy, there was little criticism of the misogynistic government and Islamic religion (of which the bride is forced to convert in order to travel). On the topic of head scarves, the bride Heather at least sheepishly insinuates that the garment is oppressive. All her new husband can say is that she looks sexy in it. Eck. Both Alex and his filmmaker sister seemed complicit in the misogyny and oppression through their jaw-gaped admiration of Iran. At least, Marjan Tehrani could hide behind a well-placed camera.