Arabian Nights: Volume 1 - The Restless One (As Mil e Uma Noites: Volume 1, O Inquieto) Reviews

  • May 09, 2017

    awesome way to talk about crisis

    awesome way to talk about crisis

  • Jan 16, 2017

    Genial! Excelente abordagem ao combinar o género documentário com ficção. Boa representação. Uma forte mensagem política. Tudo é autêntico. Comprar o DVD foi uma boa opção. Todas as narrativas têm muito simbolismo, muitos detalhes, tem de ser visto e revisto. Um filme que nos faz pensar, como todos os grandes filmes. Sem dúvida uma invulgar obra de arte.

    Genial! Excelente abordagem ao combinar o género documentário com ficção. Boa representação. Uma forte mensagem política. Tudo é autêntico. Comprar o DVD foi uma boa opção. Todas as narrativas têm muito simbolismo, muitos detalhes, tem de ser visto e revisto. Um filme que nos faz pensar, como todos os grandes filmes. Sem dúvida uma invulgar obra de arte.

  • Oct 30, 2016

    Portugal's socio-political ironic fairy tales.

    Portugal's socio-political ironic fairy tales.

  • Carlos M Super Reviewer
    Oct 16, 2016

    A restless director plunges us in a brilliant blend of documentary and fiction to comment on the political situation of contemporary Portugal: austerity, economic crisis, unemployment and the emptiness of our times; and he does so with a lot of compassion and a wonderful humor.

    A restless director plunges us in a brilliant blend of documentary and fiction to comment on the political situation of contemporary Portugal: austerity, economic crisis, unemployment and the emptiness of our times; and he does so with a lot of compassion and a wonderful humor.

  • Sep 11, 2016

    The first part of Miguel Gomes' six-hour film, "Arabian Nights," is a string of surreal vignettes that metaphorically critique his homeland of Portugal. With an underlying importance that is conveyed with urgency, Gomes shares his vertigo with the audience - sometimes for better and sometimes for worse. Lingering shots and dialogue-heavy scenes stunt the film's progression and potency.

    The first part of Miguel Gomes' six-hour film, "Arabian Nights," is a string of surreal vignettes that metaphorically critique his homeland of Portugal. With an underlying importance that is conveyed with urgency, Gomes shares his vertigo with the audience - sometimes for better and sometimes for worse. Lingering shots and dialogue-heavy scenes stunt the film's progression and potency.

  • Jun 02, 2016

    7.0/10, my review: http://wp.me/p1eXom-2rs

    7.0/10, my review: http://wp.me/p1eXom-2rs

  • May 10, 2016

    Without a doubt the worse thing I've ever seen. It's took me 45 years to walk out before something ends. I gave it 1 hr 30 of the 2hr 05 duration so not like I didn't give it chance. There was a game when I was a kid called raving bonkers. I think I've just seen the film. Don't waste 2 hours of your life on this

    Without a doubt the worse thing I've ever seen. It's took me 45 years to walk out before something ends. I gave it 1 hr 30 of the 2hr 05 duration so not like I didn't give it chance. There was a game when I was a kid called raving bonkers. I think I've just seen the film. Don't waste 2 hours of your life on this

  • Dec 30, 2015

    Much in the vein of cinema that resonates with the mind and the soul, Arabian Nights takes a while to settle, its true power understood only after the images linger and the themes reflect the world around us. And when a filmmaker navigates between fact and fiction, drama and doc so seamlessly, the true nature of reality is lost in a quest for the identity of a country. The good, the bad and the ugly are here. Touching.

    Much in the vein of cinema that resonates with the mind and the soul, Arabian Nights takes a while to settle, its true power understood only after the images linger and the themes reflect the world around us. And when a filmmaker navigates between fact and fiction, drama and doc so seamlessly, the true nature of reality is lost in a quest for the identity of a country. The good, the bad and the ugly are here. Touching.

  • Nov 26, 2015

    The Restless One is an amazing look at how the austerity measures implemented from 2011 onwards had a negative impact on portuguese society. Miguel Gomes mixes the real stories with the fiction of Arabian Nights, resulting in a wonderful combination of reality and fiction. The story structure albeit being seperated into different short stories told by Scheherazade, has the themes of Portugal, its people, spirit and culture as the connection between them. The Restless One is gut wrenching: beginning with a mild telling of the closure of the Viana Shippyard and the plague of the Asian Wasp, it quickly evolves into the heart of portuguese problems, from the Troika and the Government's polititians arrogance and sociopathic behaviour to the despair brought by massive unemployment and the degradation of the National Health Service. Although the stories have some level of humor in them, which is understandable given the ridiculousness the real life situation reaches, it is the final act that hits hardest, with real people telling their stories, in a way that feels like a heavy punch to the stomach, as it should: these are real stories after all, despite the fictional elements of the Arabian Nights.

    The Restless One is an amazing look at how the austerity measures implemented from 2011 onwards had a negative impact on portuguese society. Miguel Gomes mixes the real stories with the fiction of Arabian Nights, resulting in a wonderful combination of reality and fiction. The story structure albeit being seperated into different short stories told by Scheherazade, has the themes of Portugal, its people, spirit and culture as the connection between them. The Restless One is gut wrenching: beginning with a mild telling of the closure of the Viana Shippyard and the plague of the Asian Wasp, it quickly evolves into the heart of portuguese problems, from the Troika and the Government's polititians arrogance and sociopathic behaviour to the despair brought by massive unemployment and the degradation of the National Health Service. Although the stories have some level of humor in them, which is understandable given the ridiculousness the real life situation reaches, it is the final act that hits hardest, with real people telling their stories, in a way that feels like a heavy punch to the stomach, as it should: these are real stories after all, despite the fictional elements of the Arabian Nights.