Ashes of Time Redux Reviews

  • Jan 01, 2020

    Ashes of time is a cinematic masterpiece, not for everyone. You start with a middle man who gets compensation for assassinations committed in China, desolate is the setting. This is a slow burner movie and this is key in the story telling and the climax of the film. It is a lesson in time and love which is poignant when you understand it. Leslie Cheung narrates as Ou-yang Feng and fills out the story around him speaking of the people pass by and make an impression on him. He speaks of a friend and a few others the long days, for he lives at an inn of sorts his life is quite uneventful. But he hires skilled warriors to do jobs for people in need or people who simply want some one killed. In the end though it is about time even though maybe slow it is fleeting and if you ever find love recognise it and hold on to it...to live, otherwise you will regret it. As I said this movie is not for everyone, pacing is slow which for me is the point...the setting is desolate after all...Ou-yang Feng is stuck in a rut after all and we live in this rut with him. The acting is good if not spot on...with an all-star cast that consists of aforementioned Leslie Cheung, and others such as Maggie Cheung, Tong Leung x 2, Jacky Cheung, Carina Lau, Charlie Yeung and more. Love is fleeting as is time. This is what i learned from this movie.

    Ashes of time is a cinematic masterpiece, not for everyone. You start with a middle man who gets compensation for assassinations committed in China, desolate is the setting. This is a slow burner movie and this is key in the story telling and the climax of the film. It is a lesson in time and love which is poignant when you understand it. Leslie Cheung narrates as Ou-yang Feng and fills out the story around him speaking of the people pass by and make an impression on him. He speaks of a friend and a few others the long days, for he lives at an inn of sorts his life is quite uneventful. But he hires skilled warriors to do jobs for people in need or people who simply want some one killed. In the end though it is about time even though maybe slow it is fleeting and if you ever find love recognise it and hold on to it...to live, otherwise you will regret it. As I said this movie is not for everyone, pacing is slow which for me is the point...the setting is desolate after all...Ou-yang Feng is stuck in a rut after all and we live in this rut with him. The acting is good if not spot on...with an all-star cast that consists of aforementioned Leslie Cheung, and others such as Maggie Cheung, Tong Leung x 2, Jacky Cheung, Carina Lau, Charlie Yeung and more. Love is fleeting as is time. This is what i learned from this movie.

  • Oct 04, 2019

    A must-see film about the philosophy of martial arts.

    A must-see film about the philosophy of martial arts.

  • Mar 14, 2019

    The Hong Kong wuxia films are well-known for strong bonds with traditional Chinese legends and philosophy. These features are also marked with plenty of bizarre martial arts scenes, crazy stunts, tricks, and symbolism. However, Kar-wai decided to test the water from a different angle. Ashes of Time is an eclectic and grotesque tale of grief and romance told in a tonally complex way, thanks to the cinematography of Christopher Doyle and Kar-wai's aesthetics. The viewers have never seen wuxia in such light before Ashes of Time. The martial arts scenes in Ashes of Time are not something we associate the film with. The combat moments look totally different from what we are used to watching wuxia. The heroes remain engaged with the romance and inner conflicts even while fighting. We see them being emotional over something and ruminating, rather than getting focused on the fight. Sometimes, these martial arts scenes are lensed in a slow-motion to emphasize the emotions we see on the protagonists' faces. The camera is focused on the mood of characters, utilizing the brilliance of light and colours that become a distinctive part of Wong Kar-Wai's work. The fights in this film are employed only to add something into the romantic mood and story. This is why Ashes of Time remains one of the most unusual wuxia films ever created. The plot of Ashes of times is non-linear and quite coherent. The protagonist martial arts master Ouyang Feng who is portrayed by Leslie Cheung encounters a few other great sword masters and wanderers. Listening to their stories about emotional dramas and disappointment, employing them or helping them out, he slowly immerses into his own anxiety and woe realizing how lonely he is. As it always happens in the films of Wong, none of the heroes is delighted to be happy in love, they all suffer from heartbreaks, under different circumstance. The encounters between Ouyang Feng and other protagonists are divided into 5 acts, based on different legends and stories. The stories are just loosely related to each other, but they all disclose peculiarities of Ouyang Feng's feelings and emotions. This is the first time Kar-wai develops and uses this approach comprising the stories in one film which are loosely connected. He would make something similar in his 2 next films and repeat the division into acts concerning the protagonist in the film 2046. Ashes of Time was praised for brilliant Christopher Doyle's cinematography once again as he claimed the best cinematographer reward at 1995 Hong Kong Film Awards. With this new success, it became clear Wong-Doyle collaboration will stand for years. In addition to this success, William Chang had won two rewards for the best art direction and best costume and make-up design. The visual part of Ashes of Times is fascinating and gorgeous, and the important credits go to William Chang for his work with costumes. Kar-wai would return to martial arts films again within almost twenty years working on The Grandmaster, which will be certainly pretty much influenced by Ashes of Time.

    The Hong Kong wuxia films are well-known for strong bonds with traditional Chinese legends and philosophy. These features are also marked with plenty of bizarre martial arts scenes, crazy stunts, tricks, and symbolism. However, Kar-wai decided to test the water from a different angle. Ashes of Time is an eclectic and grotesque tale of grief and romance told in a tonally complex way, thanks to the cinematography of Christopher Doyle and Kar-wai's aesthetics. The viewers have never seen wuxia in such light before Ashes of Time. The martial arts scenes in Ashes of Time are not something we associate the film with. The combat moments look totally different from what we are used to watching wuxia. The heroes remain engaged with the romance and inner conflicts even while fighting. We see them being emotional over something and ruminating, rather than getting focused on the fight. Sometimes, these martial arts scenes are lensed in a slow-motion to emphasize the emotions we see on the protagonists' faces. The camera is focused on the mood of characters, utilizing the brilliance of light and colours that become a distinctive part of Wong Kar-Wai's work. The fights in this film are employed only to add something into the romantic mood and story. This is why Ashes of Time remains one of the most unusual wuxia films ever created. The plot of Ashes of times is non-linear and quite coherent. The protagonist martial arts master Ouyang Feng who is portrayed by Leslie Cheung encounters a few other great sword masters and wanderers. Listening to their stories about emotional dramas and disappointment, employing them or helping them out, he slowly immerses into his own anxiety and woe realizing how lonely he is. As it always happens in the films of Wong, none of the heroes is delighted to be happy in love, they all suffer from heartbreaks, under different circumstance. The encounters between Ouyang Feng and other protagonists are divided into 5 acts, based on different legends and stories. The stories are just loosely related to each other, but they all disclose peculiarities of Ouyang Feng's feelings and emotions. This is the first time Kar-wai develops and uses this approach comprising the stories in one film which are loosely connected. He would make something similar in his 2 next films and repeat the division into acts concerning the protagonist in the film 2046. Ashes of Time was praised for brilliant Christopher Doyle's cinematography once again as he claimed the best cinematographer reward at 1995 Hong Kong Film Awards. With this new success, it became clear Wong-Doyle collaboration will stand for years. In addition to this success, William Chang had won two rewards for the best art direction and best costume and make-up design. The visual part of Ashes of Times is fascinating and gorgeous, and the important credits go to William Chang for his work with costumes. Kar-wai would return to martial arts films again within almost twenty years working on The Grandmaster, which will be certainly pretty much influenced by Ashes of Time.

  • Mar 20, 2016

    Wong Kar-wai can make beautiful films and also thick, slow, sticky films and I went in being sure this would disappoint me. And at the start it did, it was so slow, so bizarre, but it has a consistency (and some gorgeous fight scenes) that pulls you in and keeps you. A person wants to be with another person but can't be. That's a pretty simple theme to make an entire career out of and this film takes a good hard look at it from a couple of male-centric angles. Give it a go aye.

    Wong Kar-wai can make beautiful films and also thick, slow, sticky films and I went in being sure this would disappoint me. And at the start it did, it was so slow, so bizarre, but it has a consistency (and some gorgeous fight scenes) that pulls you in and keeps you. A person wants to be with another person but can't be. That's a pretty simple theme to make an entire career out of and this film takes a good hard look at it from a couple of male-centric angles. Give it a go aye.

  • Nov 20, 2015

    Demasiado dura de ver

    Demasiado dura de ver

  • Nov 01, 2014

    With painterly-like shots and pensive narration, Wong Kar-wai succeeded to create a visual poetry in a form of moving picture. Sadly, the audio parts is not properly done and the flow of narrative is actually hard to follow. When all is said and done, it is a refreshing interpretation of Jin Yong's Condor Trilogy lore and characters.

    With painterly-like shots and pensive narration, Wong Kar-wai succeeded to create a visual poetry in a form of moving picture. Sadly, the audio parts is not properly done and the flow of narrative is actually hard to follow. When all is said and done, it is a refreshing interpretation of Jin Yong's Condor Trilogy lore and characters.

  • Aug 24, 2014

    Review In A Nutshell: Before discussing the film, I just want to state to whoever is reading this that my opinion here is purely based on what I have just seen, I have no previous experience of the Wong Kar Wai's filmography and the 1994 original release of the film. Ashes of Time follows a number of random stories that revolve around a contract hit-man who lives in the desert in isolation. The film started off weak, following a character that lacked any explanation or exploration on why I should care, but as the film progressed, details emerged and eventually I found myself engaged with what was happening on screen. I cannot say, even with its revealing conclusion, that I comprehensively understood what was happening on screen as the director narrates and connects the film's stories in a slightly disjointed and jarring way. Though disorientated, I was still able to appreciate the superficial narrative and the exchanges in dialogue between the characters on screen. By the time the film reaches the second chapter, the stories being told started to become more fascinating and since the fundamentals of the protagonist has already been established during the first chapter, I didn't need to try so hard in understanding his purpose or find something to empathise with. The arrival of the blind-swordsman and the helpless woman certainly gave the film the entertainment value that was lacking in the preceding story, and at the same time provided the audience further shades of the protagonist, even if the story barely concerns him. It is during the final chapter of the film where I started to realise the value of the film's first act. The film started to make more sense and has intrigued me in wanted to come back in order to further understand the character and the director's thematic intentions. One thing I want to mention before concluding is the film's photography. I have read that this version of the film features a different colour palette from the original. Since I have yet to see the initial release, I cannot contrast the two styles, but what I can say is that I was satisfied with the film's imagery. Though there were a couple moments where it pushed the saturation to a point of feeling like pure fantasy, it did provide the film with an original flavour that prevented it from feeling dull and lifeless. Starting with the redux release may not be the optimal decision but it was either this or not watch a Wong Kar Wai film at all, as this was the only film available from him in my local library. The film features a complex story that proves to be rewarding if one is patient and willing to see it again.

    Review In A Nutshell: Before discussing the film, I just want to state to whoever is reading this that my opinion here is purely based on what I have just seen, I have no previous experience of the Wong Kar Wai's filmography and the 1994 original release of the film. Ashes of Time follows a number of random stories that revolve around a contract hit-man who lives in the desert in isolation. The film started off weak, following a character that lacked any explanation or exploration on why I should care, but as the film progressed, details emerged and eventually I found myself engaged with what was happening on screen. I cannot say, even with its revealing conclusion, that I comprehensively understood what was happening on screen as the director narrates and connects the film's stories in a slightly disjointed and jarring way. Though disorientated, I was still able to appreciate the superficial narrative and the exchanges in dialogue between the characters on screen. By the time the film reaches the second chapter, the stories being told started to become more fascinating and since the fundamentals of the protagonist has already been established during the first chapter, I didn't need to try so hard in understanding his purpose or find something to empathise with. The arrival of the blind-swordsman and the helpless woman certainly gave the film the entertainment value that was lacking in the preceding story, and at the same time provided the audience further shades of the protagonist, even if the story barely concerns him. It is during the final chapter of the film where I started to realise the value of the film's first act. The film started to make more sense and has intrigued me in wanted to come back in order to further understand the character and the director's thematic intentions. One thing I want to mention before concluding is the film's photography. I have read that this version of the film features a different colour palette from the original. Since I have yet to see the initial release, I cannot contrast the two styles, but what I can say is that I was satisfied with the film's imagery. Though there were a couple moments where it pushed the saturation to a point of feeling like pure fantasy, it did provide the film with an original flavour that prevented it from feeling dull and lifeless. Starting with the redux release may not be the optimal decision but it was either this or not watch a Wong Kar Wai film at all, as this was the only film available from him in my local library. The film features a complex story that proves to be rewarding if one is patient and willing to see it again.

  • May 30, 2014

    It was beautiful to watch, but speaking as a massive fan of Wuxia films. There are far, far better films in the genre. Coming from Kar Wai I would have expected something a bit better, even if it does have a handful of merits.

    It was beautiful to watch, but speaking as a massive fan of Wuxia films. There are far, far better films in the genre. Coming from Kar Wai I would have expected something a bit better, even if it does have a handful of merits.

  • May 13, 2014

    "Ashes Of Time Redux" es una re-edicion de la pelicula de 1994 dirigida por el maestro Wong Kar Wai. La fotografia de Christopher Doyle y la coreografia de Sammo Hung, obran milagros en esta impenetrable y truculenta historia de espadachines y amorios, haciendo de "Ashes Of Time" una hermosa e increile experiencia cinematografica acerca de la memoria, asi no se logre comprender del todo el relato.

    "Ashes Of Time Redux" es una re-edicion de la pelicula de 1994 dirigida por el maestro Wong Kar Wai. La fotografia de Christopher Doyle y la coreografia de Sammo Hung, obran milagros en esta impenetrable y truculenta historia de espadachines y amorios, haciendo de "Ashes Of Time" una hermosa e increile experiencia cinematografica acerca de la memoria, asi no se logre comprender del todo el relato.

  • May 13, 2014

    A classic from Wong Kar Wai with all the once in a life time big HK movie stars. Watched this when it first released and thought it was so artistic but do not comprehend the message behind it, but after years of watching his movie, I want to think I got his message in this movie. A great thing he is re-editing it so that the west can appreciate this movie too.

    A classic from Wong Kar Wai with all the once in a life time big HK movie stars. Watched this when it first released and thought it was so artistic but do not comprehend the message behind it, but after years of watching his movie, I want to think I got his message in this movie. A great thing he is re-editing it so that the west can appreciate this movie too.