Asylum (House of Crazies) - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Asylum (House of Crazies) Reviews

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½ November 20, 2010
Amicus horror anthology,with stories written by Robert Bloch (Psycho).Well made,good acting,and an iconic score.
November 10, 2010
The stories start off well but get progressively worse and lead up to a limp ending. Stellar cast helps lift it up a bit.
October 11, 2010
A typically mixed bag of horror in this anthology from Amicus, it's got some great sets and an unnerving feel, but for whatever reason it manages to end on the weakest of the three storylines, aside from the stinger involved in the wraparound tale.

Worth a rental, but nothing too special.
½ October 5, 2010
Out of the stories, the best one is "Lucy Comes to Stay". The framing story that surrounds the short films is much better than the films themselves.
October 1, 2010
Dated, but still enjoyable British horror anthology that plays out a lot like Tales From the Crypt. Some of the stories are unoriginal like a man's dead wife gets revenge on him, or a woman's best friend is only around when a murder is comittited. On the other hand there are some good ones like the tailor that is given some special fabric to make a suit out of and also the scientist thatakes little dolls with human organs to do his dirty work. If you are looking for some light old school horror this is a perfect place to look.
August 10, 2010
It is not necessary to my life to watch this one.
½ August 7, 2010
Asylum is a fun omnibus horror film from British horror company Amicus and director Roy Ward Baker of Hamer and Amicus fame. The stories are strung together by an interesting and original frame story. A psychiatrist arrives at an asylum to take over from the former doctor who went insane. The director invites him to meet the patients and decide for himself wihich one of them was the former doctor. As he meets each of the four patients, there stories unfold for us. Stories of murder and the supernatural comingle as explanations of how these patients have come to be labeled as insane. Or are they really insane? Asylum blurs the lines between reality and the paranormal and asks where designations such as sane and insane truly hold any bearing. A fun little horror film that will delight fans of Hammer and Amicus.
June 18, 2010
Fun anthology flick with Cushing, Ekland and Lom.
½ June 16, 2010
Strange. Very strange. From dismembered body parts that come to life, seeking retribution to mannequins that come to life when donning a suit made from a certain material to little voodoo dolls that walk & kill, the flick was just plain weird. Entertaining enough, I guess. It's basically a Tales From The Crypt/Creepshow type deal where there's 4 mini stories that tie into the main story of a man visiting the asylum in hopes of being appointed head doctor. Worth the watch, once, but for me - not a keeper.
April 30, 2010
A good, but not great, Amicus collection here. Of the 4, the Charlotte Rampling one is the best because, fuck, it's Charlotte Rampling, and the doll one at the end is the weakest. Actually, this film is the weakest so far in the Amicus series I've seen thus far.
March 29, 2010
Works better as a visual archive of 60s/70s home interior design and fashion than a horror movie. Still, one can never go wrong with timeless lines like: "Rest in pieces"...
½ January 23, 2010
Asylum is a fun omnibus horror film from British horror company Amicus and director Roy Ward Baker of Hamer and Amicus fame. The stories are strung together by an interesting and original frame story. A psychiatrist arrives at an asylum to take over from the former doctor who went insane. The director invites him to meet the patients and decide for himself wihich one of them was the former doctor. As he meets each of the four patients, there stories unfold for us. Stories of murder and the supernatural comingle as explanations of how these patients have come to be labeled as insane. Or are they really insane? Asylum blurs the lines between reality and the paranormal and asks where designations such as sane and insane truly hold any bearing. A fun little horror film that will delight fans of Hammer and Amicus.
January 16, 2010
Pretty descent anthology with a couple of good tales but no genuine scares. Like many anthologies, the stories vary from mild to medium to piquante.
½ January 11, 2010
A bit slow but some good twists.
½ January 8, 2010
Asylum is an amusing British horror movie from the early seventies, set in a countryside castle (functioning as a lunatic asylum), which gives it a classic atmosphere. To some extent it is predictable (halfway you can sort of guess who Dr. Stark could be and the â??wrongly accusedâ?? patients experience things one feels one has seen before in other horror movies, albeit in a different way). On the other hand, it is new and refreshing, for although we can sense what is coming, it is still shocking and surprising. The frame story structure gives the plot a solid basis, and so does the fact that Dr. Martin is an outsider whose task it is to find out certain things, which allows the viewer to identify with him and venture on the same quest. The cyclic structure (story begins the way it ends) plus the matching suspenseful music (Mussorgsky is perfect for this type of movie!) completes the excellent structure of this production. It was undoubtedly cheap to produce (most of the scenes were recorded at Shepperton Studios), but that is not in the least disturbing in films like these.
January 4, 2010
A nice little anthology from Amicus. I am a big fan of the old Hammer and Amicus movies, so I really enjoyed this one.
January 2, 2010
A very good anthology, Its one of my favourites from Amicus.
mirabella1996
Super Reviewer
December 29, 2009
ASYLUM (1972)
Directed by Roy Ward Baker.
Written by Robert Bloch.


This Amicus production is another of the short horror story anthologies that the Brits did so very well in the 60s & 70s.
Written by Robert Bloch (yes...he, of Psycho fame!) & boasting a stellar cast (Peter Cushing, Robert Powell, Patrick Magee, Charlotte Rampling, Britt Ekland & Herbert Lom), this little gem of a film has all of the hallmarks of classic British horror that we know & love.....from the crumbling manor-house that-has-seen-better-days set, to the lush, gothic décor, to the anachronistic placement of the story in current times played to the dramatic max by the 'hot' young stars of the day (all funkily decked out in the obligatory latest hair, fashion & make-up).
These films are always such a terrific blast from a more innocent past that it hardly seems important that there is usually only one good story amongst the lot (in this case, it is the Peter Cushing story about a roll of magical cloth from which he hopes to have a suit made by an unsuspecting tailor that will bring his dead son back to life).
On a sour note, it did not escape my attention that the use of Mussorgsky's Night on Bald Mountain (which was put to such great atmospheric effect as the opening theme music to the film) was completely unacknowledged. Maybe the copyright had expired? Even so, rather shabby, I say.

****4 out of 5 stars****


26/12/09
December 22, 2009
6/10: Very good psychological thriller. From the same writer of Hitchcock's Psycho.
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