Battle For The Planet Of The Apes Reviews

  • 8h ago

    Battle for the Planet of the Apes (1973) is the fifth film in the original Planet of the Apes series but it is the third film in the story of Ape history. At this point in time, most of humanity has been destroyed by nuclear war and the survivors are now hiding in the ruins of the city, ill and mutated by radiation sickness. Caesar is now ruler of an Ape village where Apes and humans live together in relative peace but with resentment. Humans are beginning to be treated as lower class citizens due to their maltreatment of Apes in the past. Caesar is opposed by a gorilla named Aldo, who wants to imprison the humans who freely roam "Ape City" while doing menial labor. After returning from the ruins to find information about the future from archived recordings of his parents, Caesar must deal with Aldo's rebellion and an attack by the mutant humans. Critically, Battle for the Planet of the Apes took a beating by movie critics and viewers alike, but the film really is not that bad. It has an interesting story with layers of cultural and social subtext, while being fast paced, action packed, and entertaining. It's a good follow-up to Conquest of the Planet of the Apes (1972), my second favorite Ape film, and is a nice conclusion to Caesar's story arc. Another interesting aspect of this film is the depiction of the origin of stratification of Ape society between chimp, gorilla, and orangutan, which is on full display in the first and second films. When you look at the cyclical story structure of the entire Planet of the Apes series, this one really fits in nicely and ties the story back to the original Planet of the Apes (1968) film. Although originally Battle was supposed to be just as dark as Conquest, screenwriters John William Corrington and Joyce Hooper Corrington were brought in after story writer Paul Dehn became ill. The Corrington's went away from Dehn's original darker vision and instead used literary and cultural references to ask the question whether Ape society could overcome the prior mistakes of humanity and form a more hopeful future. This implies that the future of Apes, Humans, and the Earth are not predestined but rather a result of the conscious choices we make. This right away makes Battle the most optimistic of the series and a good way to bring the series to a close. Overall, Battle for the Planet of the Apes is not a great movie, but it's not as bad as many critics claim. Although it suffers from a very low budget, it still has a solid story, interesting characters, and entertaining action. It is my third favorite in the original series and deserves reevaluation.

    Battle for the Planet of the Apes (1973) is the fifth film in the original Planet of the Apes series but it is the third film in the story of Ape history. At this point in time, most of humanity has been destroyed by nuclear war and the survivors are now hiding in the ruins of the city, ill and mutated by radiation sickness. Caesar is now ruler of an Ape village where Apes and humans live together in relative peace but with resentment. Humans are beginning to be treated as lower class citizens due to their maltreatment of Apes in the past. Caesar is opposed by a gorilla named Aldo, who wants to imprison the humans who freely roam "Ape City" while doing menial labor. After returning from the ruins to find information about the future from archived recordings of his parents, Caesar must deal with Aldo's rebellion and an attack by the mutant humans. Critically, Battle for the Planet of the Apes took a beating by movie critics and viewers alike, but the film really is not that bad. It has an interesting story with layers of cultural and social subtext, while being fast paced, action packed, and entertaining. It's a good follow-up to Conquest of the Planet of the Apes (1972), my second favorite Ape film, and is a nice conclusion to Caesar's story arc. Another interesting aspect of this film is the depiction of the origin of stratification of Ape society between chimp, gorilla, and orangutan, which is on full display in the first and second films. When you look at the cyclical story structure of the entire Planet of the Apes series, this one really fits in nicely and ties the story back to the original Planet of the Apes (1968) film. Although originally Battle was supposed to be just as dark as Conquest, screenwriters John William Corrington and Joyce Hooper Corrington were brought in after story writer Paul Dehn became ill. The Corrington's went away from Dehn's original darker vision and instead used literary and cultural references to ask the question whether Ape society could overcome the prior mistakes of humanity and form a more hopeful future. This implies that the future of Apes, Humans, and the Earth are not predestined but rather a result of the conscious choices we make. This right away makes Battle the most optimistic of the series and a good way to bring the series to a close. Overall, Battle for the Planet of the Apes is not a great movie, but it's not as bad as many critics claim. Although it suffers from a very low budget, it still has a solid story, interesting characters, and entertaining action. It is my third favorite in the original series and deserves reevaluation.

  • Oct 25, 2020

    I have rarely seen a movie so thoroughly damaged by being criminally under-budgeted. What is the purpose of anointing an excellent movie with a decent budget only to slash it by half each time that a sequel came out? Is it to prove that those who love the original were wrong to do so because the story can't possibly pan out? It could've, and I believe it would've had there been a budget to show an actual "battle" for the planet of the apes. As it stands at least a full hour of the 93-minute runtime is spent on pure dialogue and conjecture and the action scenes were minimized by the very good screenplay drama going on in the background. Apparently Fox knew that this would be going to TV shortly afterwards, so why not bulk up the budget and give people a reason to tune in? Instead it shat this movie series out on the smallest whimper and forced anyone willing to watch the TV version to accept this level of mediocrity. They made themselves ripe for a remake only because of the cruelty with which they restricted budgets of the sequels. Sad.

    I have rarely seen a movie so thoroughly damaged by being criminally under-budgeted. What is the purpose of anointing an excellent movie with a decent budget only to slash it by half each time that a sequel came out? Is it to prove that those who love the original were wrong to do so because the story can't possibly pan out? It could've, and I believe it would've had there been a budget to show an actual "battle" for the planet of the apes. As it stands at least a full hour of the 93-minute runtime is spent on pure dialogue and conjecture and the action scenes were minimized by the very good screenplay drama going on in the background. Apparently Fox knew that this would be going to TV shortly afterwards, so why not bulk up the budget and give people a reason to tune in? Instead it shat this movie series out on the smallest whimper and forced anyone willing to watch the TV version to accept this level of mediocrity. They made themselves ripe for a remake only because of the cruelty with which they restricted budgets of the sequels. Sad.

  • Aug 06, 2020

    Clearly the worst of the original franchise. With Conquest, we got the series' high-point & a great ending; with Battle, we get a thematically neutered, cinematically uninteresting whimper. All the charisma & urgency is replaced with a rushed conclusion & a noticeable budgetary dip. Still, my theory is solidified: the original films (outside of the first one) should be viewed as retellings of the ape religious texts, while the reboot trilogy is the actual scientific history, making both franchises vital to the entire story…while Burton's is best left forgotten in Wal-Mart's $3 bin.

    Clearly the worst of the original franchise. With Conquest, we got the series' high-point & a great ending; with Battle, we get a thematically neutered, cinematically uninteresting whimper. All the charisma & urgency is replaced with a rushed conclusion & a noticeable budgetary dip. Still, my theory is solidified: the original films (outside of the first one) should be viewed as retellings of the ape religious texts, while the reboot trilogy is the actual scientific history, making both franchises vital to the entire story…while Burton's is best left forgotten in Wal-Mart's $3 bin.

  • Jul 28, 2020

    It's not as good as the original, but not nearly as bad as people make it out to be. In my opinion escape of the planet of the apes is much worse.

    It's not as good as the original, but not nearly as bad as people make it out to be. In my opinion escape of the planet of the apes is much worse.

  • May 28, 2020

    I definitely don’t think this is the worst of the series, but it isn’t the best. I enjoyed the message of peace and harmony, which was a turn from the previous entry. The battle seemed like something of a nerf war friends would have in the back yard, but with the budgeting of the film, that doesn’t surprise me. Even if the series didn’t end with an explanation point, it does end on a note where fans can be content

    I definitely don’t think this is the worst of the series, but it isn’t the best. I enjoyed the message of peace and harmony, which was a turn from the previous entry. The battle seemed like something of a nerf war friends would have in the back yard, but with the budgeting of the film, that doesn’t surprise me. Even if the series didn’t end with an explanation point, it does end on a note where fans can be content

  • May 17, 2020

    The worst out of the original 5. Plays off like a bad tv show. No need to even watch it unless curious.

    The worst out of the original 5. Plays off like a bad tv show. No need to even watch it unless curious.

  • Mar 24, 2020

    Apes have their own territory, and Caesar has his own family. Humans are getting along with them and helping them. Of course, they have rules there too. The ending becomes intense when apes are fighting with apes since some did not like Caesar ruling. Watch these original movies!

    Apes have their own territory, and Caesar has his own family. Humans are getting along with them and helping them. Of course, they have rules there too. The ending becomes intense when apes are fighting with apes since some did not like Caesar ruling. Watch these original movies!

  • Mar 11, 2020

    1.5/5. The weakest film in the series has a few solid actors, but little more than that, thanks to a minuscule budget.

    1.5/5. The weakest film in the series has a few solid actors, but little more than that, thanks to a minuscule budget.

  • Feb 29, 2020

    No sir I don’t like it

    No sir I don’t like it

  • Jan 26, 2020

    5/10 very dated and silly.

    5/10 very dated and silly.