Bee Season Reviews

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February 18, 2012
May 12, 2006
February 4, 2006
A well-told, enjoyable and insightful film, but its not necessarily as revelatory as its makers seem to think.
December 6, 2005
...sneaks up on you starting as a family drama and tells that story in the guise of a religious thriller.
December 2, 2005
Here's an unusual but sweet little drama about a dysfunctional family.
December 1, 2005
Family dysfunctions, spellings bees, spiritual enlightenment--Bee Season definitely has an odd lot of things going on. But this family drama somehow draws you into its weird little realm and holds you there.
December 1, 2005
Very worth 'going with' for both the things it has to say and the bold ways in which it says them.
November 29, 2005
For the sake of variety, we need more spirituality in the movies, which is why the very existence of Bee Season is a blessing even if its haphazardness makes it something of a curse.
November 22, 2005
The four lead actors give strong performances and are extremely credible as a family unit.
November 19, 2005
"Bee Season" is an evenly paced, interestingly told family drama that uses the innocent device of the spelling bee as the thing that changes the Nauman family irrevocably.
November 18, 2005
It's more thoughtfully conceived than most of what passes for filmmaking these days.
November 18, 2005
Directors Scott McGehee and David Siegel and screenwriter Naomi Foner Gyllenhaal pull off the odd juxtapositions with surprising acumen.
November 18, 2005
The film succeeds, because both the tale and the young performers (Cross and Max Minghella as Eliza's teenage brother, Aaron) are so compelling.
November 18, 2005
Sometimes a movie can defy rational logic, yet still make sense emotionally in a way that pulls you through.
November 18, 2005
Though Bee Season has flaws beyond Gere's casting, it compels us to look at the things that words and lives are made of, which is no abstract achievement.
November 18, 2005
Reflecting Goldberg's virtuoso novel, the film sets up rich dichotomies of what people say and do, and of satisfying the self vs. pleasing the community.
November 17, 2005
One of the most unusual portraits of spiritual striving you're likely to see. And for that alone, it's worth your attention.
November 17, 2005
The lack of emotion is a bit off-putting at first, but as the story unfolds, we grow to appreciate that the film's detached tone reflects the family dynamics.
November 17, 2005
The intellectual grist is intriguing, but one can't escape the feeling that Bee Season is only skimming the surface of its source material.
November 17, 2005
Spare and deceptively simple, Bee Season observes its characters but refrains from judging them.
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