Bicentennial Man Reviews

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March 21, 2001
March 14, 2001
Robin Williams cae en el tipo de personaje que ha venido interpretando hasta el cansancio: el del hombre bueno que es todo emociones y que es capaz de llorar amargamente
January 1, 2001
January 1, 2000
Robin Williams continues to demand attention.
January 1, 2000
January 1, 2000
One of the greatest features of the film is the realistic aging of its characters.
January 1, 2000
A likable movie.
January 1, 2000
If anyone's going to animate a machine, it might as well be Robin Williams.
January 1, 2000
Bicentennial Man's heart may be synthetic, but it beats strongly, nonetheless.
January 1, 2000
gradually becomes more and more penetrating
January 1, 2000
Bicentennial Man is crusty, dusty, and musty. Metal or flesh-and-bone, Robin's rusty.
January 1, 2000
This tin man has a heart, but his movie needs a pulse.
January 1, 2000
A male fantasy with artificial intelligence.
January 1, 2000
So coldly calculated it could give you frostbite.
January 1, 2000
Like crossing the Sahara to get to the water, this film has a lot of dry spells and the prize may not be worth the trip.
January 1, 2000
We have a decent little film trying desperately to escape from the vicious grasp of a hokey Hollywood formula. As a result, we get a pretty average film.
January 1, 2000
The most bland, laughless film to come from the artist formerly known as manic in, well, months.
January 1, 2000
Williams has lost almost every last ounce of charm on screen.
January 1, 2000
Mr. Williams latches onto every cheap laugh he can find.
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