Blood in the Mobile Reviews

  • Apr 18, 2012

    This was a horribly done film. The filmmaker had a total disregard for the people he was "helping," as evidenced by his refusal to stop filming those who shouted at him to stop. At times, the film was so poorly done, and paid such little attention to the history of the region that it was laughable. This was complicated by the flippant fashion with which issues like rape were dealt with. I do not recommend this film.

    This was a horribly done film. The filmmaker had a total disregard for the people he was "helping," as evidenced by his refusal to stop filming those who shouted at him to stop. At times, the film was so poorly done, and paid such little attention to the history of the region that it was laughable. This was complicated by the flippant fashion with which issues like rape were dealt with. I do not recommend this film.

  • Feb 07, 2012

    This movie makes the whole technological economic situation world wide make perfect sense. Small scale metal companies sell big business super cheap minerals produced from slave labor which pays to continue funding a massive guerrilla war, many countries-wide, which will get larger and larger each year till serious action is taken. If you are reading this that means this film correlates with your lifestyle and must be more seriously understood to, if only partially, atone for the planet-wide slavery that's growing larger and larger by the day. While this issue might be a major cause, technology alone isn't the full scope as just about everything made today is in crisis with this same issue. Watch this if you even give half a fuck about life on this planet.

    This movie makes the whole technological economic situation world wide make perfect sense. Small scale metal companies sell big business super cheap minerals produced from slave labor which pays to continue funding a massive guerrilla war, many countries-wide, which will get larger and larger each year till serious action is taken. If you are reading this that means this film correlates with your lifestyle and must be more seriously understood to, if only partially, atone for the planet-wide slavery that's growing larger and larger by the day. While this issue might be a major cause, technology alone isn't the full scope as just about everything made today is in crisis with this same issue. Watch this if you even give half a fuck about life on this planet.

  • Dec 02, 2011

    This movie was very informative, but not at all entertaining, despite the author's attempt at jarring Michael-Moore-like hijinks. The documenter got away with a lot but just wasn't a good showman. I give it a good 2-star rating for the pure dissemination of information about unabashed corporate greed and military corruption brought about by the phone manufacturing industrry. Definitely worth watching.

    This movie was very informative, but not at all entertaining, despite the author's attempt at jarring Michael-Moore-like hijinks. The documenter got away with a lot but just wasn't a good showman. I give it a good 2-star rating for the pure dissemination of information about unabashed corporate greed and military corruption brought about by the phone manufacturing industrry. Definitely worth watching.

  • Nov 02, 2011

    There's a dead half-hour at the start of the film, as Poulsen is left stranded in the Nokia HQ foyer when the company's PRs shut down the lines of communication (a familiar Moore-ian trope), then heads to the Congo itself only to be refused access to the mines in question; we realise the market for documentaries is such that filmmakers can now afford to put even their failures on screen, in the assumption that the burden of proof lies with their targets, and that these shut-outs will do some of the legwork for them. (I am not quite certain this is the case.)... Once Poulsen finally obtains access to the mines, the film becomes more revelatory yet: conditions (slum housing surrounding improvised mine shafts) appear hellish and perilous enough even before one factors in the presence of men with guns taking 'taxes' off workers at the point of entry. The locals, whether jokingly or not, demand that Poulsen, too, pay them for the privilege of filming them, and one twigs that everything in this part of the world has been reduced to a transaction: it's either pay or die, a choice you half-suspect certain corporations would rather like to impose on even the developed nations. After this trip, we're plonked right back in the lobby, where Poulsen attempts to set up meetings with spokespeople who either don't want to talk to him or can only offer empty-sounding promises - material that feels more worthy of a making-of, rather than a feature proper; that has the ring of framing, rather than content. The whole does just about enough to have you chewing over the original assertion, but it does have the feel of a punchy hour-long episode of "Dispatches" that keeps getting lost in reception.

    There's a dead half-hour at the start of the film, as Poulsen is left stranded in the Nokia HQ foyer when the company's PRs shut down the lines of communication (a familiar Moore-ian trope), then heads to the Congo itself only to be refused access to the mines in question; we realise the market for documentaries is such that filmmakers can now afford to put even their failures on screen, in the assumption that the burden of proof lies with their targets, and that these shut-outs will do some of the legwork for them. (I am not quite certain this is the case.)... Once Poulsen finally obtains access to the mines, the film becomes more revelatory yet: conditions (slum housing surrounding improvised mine shafts) appear hellish and perilous enough even before one factors in the presence of men with guns taking 'taxes' off workers at the point of entry. The locals, whether jokingly or not, demand that Poulsen, too, pay them for the privilege of filming them, and one twigs that everything in this part of the world has been reduced to a transaction: it's either pay or die, a choice you half-suspect certain corporations would rather like to impose on even the developed nations. After this trip, we're plonked right back in the lobby, where Poulsen attempts to set up meetings with spokespeople who either don't want to talk to him or can only offer empty-sounding promises - material that feels more worthy of a making-of, rather than a feature proper; that has the ring of framing, rather than content. The whole does just about enough to have you chewing over the original assertion, but it does have the feel of a punchy hour-long episode of "Dispatches" that keeps getting lost in reception.

  • Oct 23, 2011

    i odjekuje i odjekuje i jeci i traje...dzaba vam sake na usima: da li se cujemo? ne, to nije glas iz vase super igracke:)

    i odjekuje i odjekuje i jeci i traje...dzaba vam sake na usima: da li se cujemo? ne, to nije glas iz vase super igracke:)