Reviews

  • Feb 01, 2021

    Mamoru Hosoda, one of the contemporary Japanese anime directors, frequently follows certain patterns in his feature-length anime films. Certain elements are usually linked to each other by bearing symbolic meanings. Different creatures become family members. An object, usually an image, takes us back and forth in time. Tradition plays an important role in shaping modern life. In this review, I will explain these recurring elements in five different anime films that Hosoda produced after the 2000s: The Girl Who Leapt Through Time (2006), Summer Wars (2009), Wolf Children Ame and Yuki (2012), The Boy and the Beast (2015), Mirai (2018). We will look at how Mamoru Hosoda reproduces the issues of family ties and childhood, creatures and strangers, traditions and roots, classical master-apprentice relations, country and city, time and space in his unique narrative style. Full review: https://guncesinema.com/en/from-aliens-to-family-from-family-to-roots/

    Mamoru Hosoda, one of the contemporary Japanese anime directors, frequently follows certain patterns in his feature-length anime films. Certain elements are usually linked to each other by bearing symbolic meanings. Different creatures become family members. An object, usually an image, takes us back and forth in time. Tradition plays an important role in shaping modern life. In this review, I will explain these recurring elements in five different anime films that Hosoda produced after the 2000s: The Girl Who Leapt Through Time (2006), Summer Wars (2009), Wolf Children Ame and Yuki (2012), The Boy and the Beast (2015), Mirai (2018). We will look at how Mamoru Hosoda reproduces the issues of family ties and childhood, creatures and strangers, traditions and roots, classical master-apprentice relations, country and city, time and space in his unique narrative style. Full review: https://guncesinema.com/en/from-aliens-to-family-from-family-to-roots/

  • Feb 01, 2021

    beautiful coming of age film

    beautiful coming of age film

  • Jan 03, 2021

    Though it bogs down a bit in the middle and feels like it has at least five ending, this anime is a very touching and sweet tale. It's honest in it's portrayal of the main character feeling displaced. Trippy moments synonymous with this previous studio's work along with earnest story telling make this an anime worth watching, besides some pacing issues.

    Though it bogs down a bit in the middle and feels like it has at least five ending, this anime is a very touching and sweet tale. It's honest in it's portrayal of the main character feeling displaced. Trippy moments synonymous with this previous studio's work along with earnest story telling make this an anime worth watching, besides some pacing issues.

  • Jan 15, 2020

    Not quite as good as Wolf Children but still very good on its own. The main character is a 4 year old brat who must learn how to deal with his feelings now that he has a little sister. The story has an episodic format so as soon as he learns something he forgets about it the next day. So in other words he acts like a real kid. It’s all from his point of view. I recommend this for families with young kids. It’s a heartfelt slice of life with a little magic.

    Not quite as good as Wolf Children but still very good on its own. The main character is a 4 year old brat who must learn how to deal with his feelings now that he has a little sister. The story has an episodic format so as soon as he learns something he forgets about it the next day. So in other words he acts like a real kid. It’s all from his point of view. I recommend this for families with young kids. It’s a heartfelt slice of life with a little magic.