Boys Cry (La terra dell'abbastanza) Reviews

  • Oct 19, 2018

    Manolo (Andrea Carpenzano) and Mirko (Matteo Olivetti) have been through primary and high school together. They have girlfriends and dead-end jobs delivering pizza. When Mirko accidently runs down a guy, killing him, Manolo tells him to keep going - his dad will know what to do. From that moment their lives change. An accidental hit and run that happens to take out a snitch of the mafia makes them think they've won the lottery when the accident ends in an induction - going from zero to a thousand in a moment making a rags to riches change in their lives. All they have to do is kill and pimp-out underage girls. Mirko's girlfriend asks, 'If you and me broke up would you cry?' When he doesn't answer she says, 'I would'. When a high-risk job comes up the Captain of the mafia knows the stupidity of asking the new recruits to complete what really should be done by an experienced killer. But what have they got to lose? Two kids? Slowly turning into psychos? 'Boys Cry' is about a sickness that slowly eats away the two boys' lives until there's nothing left. The film's blunt and at times boring, like a meaningless life. Even down to the mafia hench men making sauce on the same stove-top as a bubbling concoction of drugs; the every-day in the setting of crime making the crime seem every-day. It's a comment on the value of life. Where the reaction to wrong isn't emotional but a physical sickness. Where empathy is replaced with ambition. 'Boys Cry' isn't a fast-paced thriller, yet it was hard to look away as these two young guys waste their lives and sell their souls because they don't realise what they're losing. Some of the camera work gets creative, focussing on the eyes; panning above to show a map of attack, to distance the action only to grip when the action is filmed inside - simple yet effective. But the film is driven by dialogue, by the conversation between the two friends as they descend into a space where they cease to feel. A good quality slow burner.

    Manolo (Andrea Carpenzano) and Mirko (Matteo Olivetti) have been through primary and high school together. They have girlfriends and dead-end jobs delivering pizza. When Mirko accidently runs down a guy, killing him, Manolo tells him to keep going - his dad will know what to do. From that moment their lives change. An accidental hit and run that happens to take out a snitch of the mafia makes them think they've won the lottery when the accident ends in an induction - going from zero to a thousand in a moment making a rags to riches change in their lives. All they have to do is kill and pimp-out underage girls. Mirko's girlfriend asks, 'If you and me broke up would you cry?' When he doesn't answer she says, 'I would'. When a high-risk job comes up the Captain of the mafia knows the stupidity of asking the new recruits to complete what really should be done by an experienced killer. But what have they got to lose? Two kids? Slowly turning into psychos? 'Boys Cry' is about a sickness that slowly eats away the two boys' lives until there's nothing left. The film's blunt and at times boring, like a meaningless life. Even down to the mafia hench men making sauce on the same stove-top as a bubbling concoction of drugs; the every-day in the setting of crime making the crime seem every-day. It's a comment on the value of life. Where the reaction to wrong isn't emotional but a physical sickness. Where empathy is replaced with ambition. 'Boys Cry' isn't a fast-paced thriller, yet it was hard to look away as these two young guys waste their lives and sell their souls because they don't realise what they're losing. Some of the camera work gets creative, focussing on the eyes; panning above to show a map of attack, to distance the action only to grip when the action is filmed inside - simple yet effective. But the film is driven by dialogue, by the conversation between the two friends as they descend into a space where they cease to feel. A good quality slow burner.