Breakfast With Hunter Reviews

  • Apr 14, 2013

    For hardcore fans of the Gonzo journalist, Hunter S. Thompson.

    For hardcore fans of the Gonzo journalist, Hunter S. Thompson.

  • Nov 28, 2012

    A really good HST documentary.

    A really good HST documentary.

  • Sep 07, 2010

    OMG! It was AWESOME!

    OMG! It was AWESOME!

  • Jul 31, 2010

    It's Hunter S. Thompson.

    It's Hunter S. Thompson.

  • May 11, 2010

    Great footage. Archival. Plenty of supplemental extras.

    Great footage. Archival. Plenty of supplemental extras.

  • May 11, 2010

    They say that documentaries live or die based on their subject, and that is especially the case when it comes to cinema verite. While the director does exercise certain control over the film's look or feel and the editing process, he has little control over the actual content in the film. For the most part, the director has to pick an interesting enough subject and hope that something entertaining will happen to them. Wayne Ewing picked a terrific subject in Hunter S. Thompson, but showed that a great subject does not guarantee a great film. In case you've been asleep for the past thirty-five years or so, Hunter S. Thompson is the famed author of Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail, and most recently Kingdom of Fear. He has written for numerous publications, including Rolling Stone and ESPN. Through Thompson's writing, he has established himself as the ageless hipster, the spokesperson for America's counterculture, the rebel outlaw trying to shake up the system, and practically the poster boy for recreational drug use in America. He's cooler than cool and has the books, the feature film and now the documentary to prove it. There are few individuals in America, or maybe even on the planet, who are nearly as colorful, energetic, and of course controversial than Hunter. Breakfast with Hunter takes place during 1996 and 1997, and focuses partly on the two most significant events in Hunter's life at the time, an impending DUI trial in Aspen and the upcoming film project for his classic book Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. Most of the scenes, however, are five minute random slices of his life, ranging from him cooking breakfast on the farm, to his trying to teach Johnny Depp's bird how to talk. We are supposed to get bite-sized tastes of Hunter's life, but most of the scenes seem to celebrate his celebrity rather than provide any insight into his life or personality. There are too many scenes where time is spent making speeches in his honor, reading passages from his book, or just namedropping celebrities or famous figures that he encounters. Instead of a penetrating picture of his life, we are left with an adulatory look at his character. In most scenes, he seems all too aware that the cameras are there, and he subsequently postures for them, which gives the film a superficial feel. Not surprisingly, the most engaging scenes of the film are when he reveals a side that someone might not otherwise see, such as the scene where he argues with Alex Cox, the first director assigned to his film project. Instead of continuing in this direction, they revert to making Hunter look cool, this time by watching a video of the same scene, laughing at how harsh he was. Hunter himself is what makes this film worth watching, just because he is such a fascinating human being. His inarticulate and playful manner gives the movie some charm, which partly makes up for its lack of substance. He makes us laugh when he goes crazy with a fire extinguisher in Rolling Stone headquarters, or shows off his talent for throwing whiskey. He is a genuinely likeable guy and a pleasure to watch, most of the time. Breakfast for Hunter is currently making its rounds on the festival circuit, and there may be a theatrical release in its future. If you can't wait, however, the DVD is already available from the website, and its loaded with special features. [size=5][b] Score: 6/10[/b][/size]

    They say that documentaries live or die based on their subject, and that is especially the case when it comes to cinema verite. While the director does exercise certain control over the film's look or feel and the editing process, he has little control over the actual content in the film. For the most part, the director has to pick an interesting enough subject and hope that something entertaining will happen to them. Wayne Ewing picked a terrific subject in Hunter S. Thompson, but showed that a great subject does not guarantee a great film. In case you've been asleep for the past thirty-five years or so, Hunter S. Thompson is the famed author of Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail, and most recently Kingdom of Fear. He has written for numerous publications, including Rolling Stone and ESPN. Through Thompson's writing, he has established himself as the ageless hipster, the spokesperson for America's counterculture, the rebel outlaw trying to shake up the system, and practically the poster boy for recreational drug use in America. He's cooler than cool and has the books, the feature film and now the documentary to prove it. There are few individuals in America, or maybe even on the planet, who are nearly as colorful, energetic, and of course controversial than Hunter. Breakfast with Hunter takes place during 1996 and 1997, and focuses partly on the two most significant events in Hunter's life at the time, an impending DUI trial in Aspen and the upcoming film project for his classic book Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. Most of the scenes, however, are five minute random slices of his life, ranging from him cooking breakfast on the farm, to his trying to teach Johnny Depp's bird how to talk. We are supposed to get bite-sized tastes of Hunter's life, but most of the scenes seem to celebrate his celebrity rather than provide any insight into his life or personality. There are too many scenes where time is spent making speeches in his honor, reading passages from his book, or just namedropping celebrities or famous figures that he encounters. Instead of a penetrating picture of his life, we are left with an adulatory look at his character. In most scenes, he seems all too aware that the cameras are there, and he subsequently postures for them, which gives the film a superficial feel. Not surprisingly, the most engaging scenes of the film are when he reveals a side that someone might not otherwise see, such as the scene where he argues with Alex Cox, the first director assigned to his film project. Instead of continuing in this direction, they revert to making Hunter look cool, this time by watching a video of the same scene, laughing at how harsh he was. Hunter himself is what makes this film worth watching, just because he is such a fascinating human being. His inarticulate and playful manner gives the movie some charm, which partly makes up for its lack of substance. He makes us laugh when he goes crazy with a fire extinguisher in Rolling Stone headquarters, or shows off his talent for throwing whiskey. He is a genuinely likeable guy and a pleasure to watch, most of the time. Breakfast for Hunter is currently making its rounds on the festival circuit, and there may be a theatrical release in its future. If you can't wait, however, the DVD is already available from the website, and its loaded with special features. [size=5][b] Score: 6/10[/b][/size]

  • May 11, 2010

    Disjointed, unfocused look at Hunter S Thompson's later life, around the time he was facing a DUI trial in Aspen and when his book, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, was being made into a movie. Highlights include him spraying Jenn Wenner with a fire extinguisher during a visit to the Rolling Stone offices in New York. He also erupts at Alex Cox during the director's visit to his "fortified compound", Owl Farm, when Cox was in talks to make Fear and Loathing (there was a lawsuit, details of which are covered in extras on the Criterion DVD of Fear and Loathing). Thompson is most upset by Cox's plan to animate Steadman's drawings, thinking he's being trivilised. Ironically, a new director is brought in -- Terry Gilliam, a former animator. But by then, the producer knew how to handle Hunter, and probably making him a cartoon was never again mentioned. To ensure Johnny Depp's place in the film, Hunter agrees to teach Johnny's mynah how to talk, a surreal scene, when the bird gets loose in Hunter's house. Hunter also meets Eugene McCarthy and George McGovern at a 75th birthday bash for McGovern. And, he attends the Fear and Loathing premiere with George Plimpton in tow. Sad, both these writers are now gone.

    Disjointed, unfocused look at Hunter S Thompson's later life, around the time he was facing a DUI trial in Aspen and when his book, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, was being made into a movie. Highlights include him spraying Jenn Wenner with a fire extinguisher during a visit to the Rolling Stone offices in New York. He also erupts at Alex Cox during the director's visit to his "fortified compound", Owl Farm, when Cox was in talks to make Fear and Loathing (there was a lawsuit, details of which are covered in extras on the Criterion DVD of Fear and Loathing). Thompson is most upset by Cox's plan to animate Steadman's drawings, thinking he's being trivilised. Ironically, a new director is brought in -- Terry Gilliam, a former animator. But by then, the producer knew how to handle Hunter, and probably making him a cartoon was never again mentioned. To ensure Johnny Depp's place in the film, Hunter agrees to teach Johnny's mynah how to talk, a surreal scene, when the bird gets loose in Hunter's house. Hunter also meets Eugene McCarthy and George McGovern at a 75th birthday bash for McGovern. And, he attends the Fear and Loathing premiere with George Plimpton in tow. Sad, both these writers are now gone.

  • Feb 11, 2010

    I liked it, but then im a thompson fan, those not familiar with his writing or his infamy will struggle to find interest as this is merely a snapshot of his life and no kind of introduction, if thats what you want, you should refer to the more recent 'Gonzo' documentary

    I liked it, but then im a thompson fan, those not familiar with his writing or his infamy will struggle to find interest as this is merely a snapshot of his life and no kind of introduction, if thats what you want, you should refer to the more recent 'Gonzo' documentary

  • Dec 07, 2009

    An interesting look into the mind of a mad genius and raving lunatic. I think the strangest thing with him is that our current generation relates so much to him, but he was writing stories in the 60's and lived through all the hippie shit and the Nixon era. Amazing how relevant he still is today.

    An interesting look into the mind of a mad genius and raving lunatic. I think the strangest thing with him is that our current generation relates so much to him, but he was writing stories in the 60's and lived through all the hippie shit and the Nixon era. Amazing how relevant he still is today.

  • Jun 02, 2009

    Only covers a few years (96-98) but it is great stuff. Totally different to "Gonzo", which is more "official" and orthodox in structure. This is just a camera following Hunter and friends. Great scene where he tells Alex Cox what's what and some intimate footage of Johnny Depp getting into character for the Fear and Loathing movie. Highly recommended for Hunter fans.

    Only covers a few years (96-98) but it is great stuff. Totally different to "Gonzo", which is more "official" and orthodox in structure. This is just a camera following Hunter and friends. Great scene where he tells Alex Cox what's what and some intimate footage of Johnny Depp getting into character for the Fear and Loathing movie. Highly recommended for Hunter fans.