Bride of the Wind Reviews

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April 7, 2009
Alma Mahler is flirting again.
March 19, 2002
An often silly and oddly tepid biopic from director Bruce Beresford.
January 22, 2002
As Sarah Wynter plays Alma, it's difficult to see what all the hue and cry was about.
September 20, 2001
Watching it is like walking, walking, walking down a never-ending aisle.
August 9, 2001
The filmmakers' limited notions of genius, simple humanity and, probably, feminism seem to have defeated everyone involved.
June 29, 2001
The turgid Marilyn Levy screenplay ... induced giggles at the screening.
June 25, 2001
Levy's bloodless screenplay runs dutifully through Alma's life as though ticking off the points against a checklist.
June 22, 2001
Alma is pretty, but her character otherwise is not attractive.
June 22, 2001
The script provides a barrage of consistently ludicrously banal and pretentious verbiage.
June 22, 2001
It's biography as burlesque: a little song, a little dance, a little pastry down your pants.
June 22, 2001
One of the worst biopics I have ever seen, a leaden march through a chronology of Alma's affairs.
June 22, 2001
It skims Alma's life like a thrown rock skipping over a pond.
June 21, 2001
Looks great but lacks depth and warmth.
June 15, 2001
Even though the performers do their utmost to live in the skin of their characters, they're too suffocated to be believable.
June 15, 2001
For all its sobriety, it adds very little new to the record, and it takes few speculative chances.
June 15, 2001
Despite all the sturm-und-drang of Alma Mahler's life, Bride Of The Wind fails to arouse much emotion in the viewer.
June 15, 2001
A sodden 'feminist' vulgarization of the life of Alma Schindler.
June 15, 2001
This is so bad a film, so clumsy and obvious in its dialogue and plot points, one wonders why it's even being released.
June 14, 2001
The woman who was muse, mother, and a musician in her own right remains no more than a striking beauty with a couple of drop-dead dresses.
June 11, 2001
Deadly dull when it should pulse with the realities of what was one of Europe's most electric and fecund cultural periods, Bride of the Wind virtually defines the costume drama at its most starchy.
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