Call Me Kuchu Reviews

  • Jul 03, 2016

    Very good documentary. Very well made and down to earth.

    Very good documentary. Very well made and down to earth.

  • Mar 06, 2016

    There's courage, and then there's what the men and women at the center of Call Me Kuchu display. This exceptional documentary, from directors Katherine Fairfax Wright and Malika Zouhali-Worrall, chronicles the fight for LGBT rights in Uganda where homosexuality is illegal and almost became a capital offense. For these individuals, among them Uganda's first openly gay man David Kato, leaving the country to escape persecution isn't an option. If they leave, who will remain to protect those still in the closet or future generations who will try to live as out men and women among violent zealots? But each stays knowing any day, a bigot will end his or her life, and tragically, over the course of Call Me Kuchu, that will be the case for someone. It's a rough (but important and rewarding) film to watch because while it's easy to admire these men and women, they suffer a lot, and there's little hope in sight. Of course, they're working tirelessly, but the deck is so stacked against them-a leading newspaper, for example, is publishing the names, pictures, and addresses of "suspected homos" in addition to blaming a terrorist bombing on sexual minorities. We never get the impression their winning over hearts and minds. Our half dozen main characters are not alone, however, and Call Me Kuchu ultimately uplifts because we see cracks in this seemingly unbreakable ceiling. They take the aforementioned newspaper-Rolling Stone, which is little more than a tabloid-and its horrifying, smug editor to court and win. They find inroads at the United Nations. And even on the religious front, they find an essential ally in the form of Bishop Christopher Senyonjo, who remarks while encouraging his friends to stay strong, "I am free because I know the truth. And I will stand for that truth." Moving words. If you find yourself troubled by the film's setup, its conclusion might overwhelm you. There's so much raw pain on the screen. I'm not sure I'll ever forget it, but you see those suffering standing tall eventually, and it's encouraging. Call Me Kuchu-which derives its title from a slang term meaning "gay"-shines a light on repression of the worst and most dangerous kind. It shows us how little we as citizens of the world sometimes learn from the mistakes of the past. And it's a heart-wrenching reminder that if you don't stand for something, you'll fall for anything. http://www.johnlikesmovies.com/call-me-kuchu-review/

    There's courage, and then there's what the men and women at the center of Call Me Kuchu display. This exceptional documentary, from directors Katherine Fairfax Wright and Malika Zouhali-Worrall, chronicles the fight for LGBT rights in Uganda where homosexuality is illegal and almost became a capital offense. For these individuals, among them Uganda's first openly gay man David Kato, leaving the country to escape persecution isn't an option. If they leave, who will remain to protect those still in the closet or future generations who will try to live as out men and women among violent zealots? But each stays knowing any day, a bigot will end his or her life, and tragically, over the course of Call Me Kuchu, that will be the case for someone. It's a rough (but important and rewarding) film to watch because while it's easy to admire these men and women, they suffer a lot, and there's little hope in sight. Of course, they're working tirelessly, but the deck is so stacked against them-a leading newspaper, for example, is publishing the names, pictures, and addresses of "suspected homos" in addition to blaming a terrorist bombing on sexual minorities. We never get the impression their winning over hearts and minds. Our half dozen main characters are not alone, however, and Call Me Kuchu ultimately uplifts because we see cracks in this seemingly unbreakable ceiling. They take the aforementioned newspaper-Rolling Stone, which is little more than a tabloid-and its horrifying, smug editor to court and win. They find inroads at the United Nations. And even on the religious front, they find an essential ally in the form of Bishop Christopher Senyonjo, who remarks while encouraging his friends to stay strong, "I am free because I know the truth. And I will stand for that truth." Moving words. If you find yourself troubled by the film's setup, its conclusion might overwhelm you. There's so much raw pain on the screen. I'm not sure I'll ever forget it, but you see those suffering standing tall eventually, and it's encouraging. Call Me Kuchu-which derives its title from a slang term meaning "gay"-shines a light on repression of the worst and most dangerous kind. It shows us how little we as citizens of the world sometimes learn from the mistakes of the past. And it's a heart-wrenching reminder that if you don't stand for something, you'll fall for anything. http://www.johnlikesmovies.com/call-me-kuchu-review/

  • Aug 17, 2014

    the ugandan homosexual community's struggles are truly moving and i was impressed with the access the filmmakers had to various sources and events. i was really moved by the sudden death of david kato and the scenes that followed, and it's sad to think that the struggle there is not over yet. though there were great moments of tenderness scattered throughout the film, i wish they had been more frequent.

    the ugandan homosexual community's struggles are truly moving and i was impressed with the access the filmmakers had to various sources and events. i was really moved by the sudden death of david kato and the scenes that followed, and it's sad to think that the struggle there is not over yet. though there were great moments of tenderness scattered throughout the film, i wish they had been more frequent.

  • Jan 18, 2014

    It's heartbreaking but you must watch it

    It's heartbreaking but you must watch it

  • Dec 10, 2013

    Riveting documentary about human rights struggle in Uganda. You will never forget the people you meet in this documentary.

    Riveting documentary about human rights struggle in Uganda. You will never forget the people you meet in this documentary.

  • Oct 28, 2013

    Powerful and moving you would have to be heartless not to shed a tear as you watch the brave men and women of Ugandas LGBT community fight legislation that would leave them facing the death penalty. It therefore seems churlish in the face of such dramatic and worthy subject mater to critique the quality of the film making however I felt a better edit would have revealed a tighter narrative.

    Powerful and moving you would have to be heartless not to shed a tear as you watch the brave men and women of Ugandas LGBT community fight legislation that would leave them facing the death penalty. It therefore seems churlish in the face of such dramatic and worthy subject mater to critique the quality of the film making however I felt a better edit would have revealed a tighter narrative.

  • Oct 19, 2013

    A devastating document of the very worst that humanity has to offer, yet also the very best. Incredibly important, and beautifully made.

    A devastating document of the very worst that humanity has to offer, yet also the very best. Incredibly important, and beautifully made.

  • Sep 28, 2013

    Documentaries are a mixed bag: some try so hard to make their subject matter palatable to a wider audience that they unintentionally dilute the subject matter. Not this one. This is an unflinching look at a heartbreakingly vulnerable community of gay activists in a country where that can get you killed. Their courage gives new meaning to the word "heroic". They literally stared down the monster of hatred and condemnation, and not surprisingly paid a price to do so. what's not surprising is that some evangelical opportunist would choose Uganda as the perfect place to spout his hate-filled rants and thereby incite and encourage violence against non-violent people who are gay. The Ugandan government officials and tabloid-like newspapapers come across as embarrassingly ignorant, particularly with their insistence that gays are a "threat" to families and that gays "recruit" young people. Like so many thick-headed, myopic people throughout history people before them , they cling desperately to the notion that being gay is a "choice" when it is innate identity. That line of ignorant reasoning allows them to do what religious fanatics have done throughout time, wage war against other people in the name of moral and spiritual superiority. My opinion only, but there is a word for such hate-filled humans: HYPOCRITES. This doc shows them once again fanning the flames of hate and ignoring three simple, but powerful words in the Word: God is love. Luckily, these Ugandan activists had worlwide support in their resistance to laws that would've made being gay worthy of imprisonment and perhaps even death. Interestingly, this doc not only illustrates the hypocrisy of religious hate-mongers, but the power of the Internet to humiliate and shame a country all to willing to play into their hands. This is one very exceptional and brave documentary; don't miss it.

    Documentaries are a mixed bag: some try so hard to make their subject matter palatable to a wider audience that they unintentionally dilute the subject matter. Not this one. This is an unflinching look at a heartbreakingly vulnerable community of gay activists in a country where that can get you killed. Their courage gives new meaning to the word "heroic". They literally stared down the monster of hatred and condemnation, and not surprisingly paid a price to do so. what's not surprising is that some evangelical opportunist would choose Uganda as the perfect place to spout his hate-filled rants and thereby incite and encourage violence against non-violent people who are gay. The Ugandan government officials and tabloid-like newspapapers come across as embarrassingly ignorant, particularly with their insistence that gays are a "threat" to families and that gays "recruit" young people. Like so many thick-headed, myopic people throughout history people before them , they cling desperately to the notion that being gay is a "choice" when it is innate identity. That line of ignorant reasoning allows them to do what religious fanatics have done throughout time, wage war against other people in the name of moral and spiritual superiority. My opinion only, but there is a word for such hate-filled humans: HYPOCRITES. This doc shows them once again fanning the flames of hate and ignoring three simple, but powerful words in the Word: God is love. Luckily, these Ugandan activists had worlwide support in their resistance to laws that would've made being gay worthy of imprisonment and perhaps even death. Interestingly, this doc not only illustrates the hypocrisy of religious hate-mongers, but the power of the Internet to humiliate and shame a country all to willing to play into their hands. This is one very exceptional and brave documentary; don't miss it.

  • Aug 23, 2013

    This film is a powerful and moving insight into the lives of those living with terrible insecurity, inequality and fear in Uganda as the country becomes more and more intolerant of it's gay citizens. David Kato was an inspirational champion of gay rights in Uganda and hopefully his participation in 'Call me Kuchu' will help stop the deplorable "Anti-Homosexuality Bill" (A.K.A. "Kill the gays Bill) from ever becoming law. A must watch for anyone interested in gay and/or human rights.

    This film is a powerful and moving insight into the lives of those living with terrible insecurity, inequality and fear in Uganda as the country becomes more and more intolerant of it's gay citizens. David Kato was an inspirational champion of gay rights in Uganda and hopefully his participation in 'Call me Kuchu' will help stop the deplorable "Anti-Homosexuality Bill" (A.K.A. "Kill the gays Bill) from ever becoming law. A must watch for anyone interested in gay and/or human rights.

  • Jul 01, 2013

    Touching & real , even in the dark sides it's showing

    Touching & real , even in the dark sides it's showing