Capitalism: A Love Story Reviews

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February 26, 2010
The thesis that rapacious capitalism has horrific social consequences is credible and well illustrated, if hardly eye-opening to European viewers.
February 26, 2010
For all his cheap tactics, Moore mounts a persuasive case that something is rotten in the current economic system.
February 26, 2010
Michael Moore has succeeded in getting a film on this subject actually released in cinemas: a very sharp and entertaining one at that.
February 26, 2010
Funny, angry and deadly accurate.
February 26, 2010
The most interesting aspect of Capitalism is a strain of melancholic nostalgia that runs through its latter segments
February 26, 2010
The film is good fun. Perhaps we have seen it all before, but you could say that of a sunrise. Every sunrise is different and Moore's are usually worth getting out of bed for.
February 26, 2010
Moore is marvellously indignant and confrontational (he tries to make a citizen's arrest of the AIG board), and dramatises moments of rebellion and fight-back with relish. But there's something self-righteous and teenage-lefty about his rhetoric.
February 26, 2010
The movie is archive-heavy and preachy, but it feels just right for the occasion.
November 5, 2009
Moore is always visually playful and subversive, and even when dealing with such serious and depressing topics entertaining; but he's also game enough to examine America's mythology of prosperity.
November 4, 2009
Moore has long proved himself an excellent editor and comedian, but he always insists on preaching to the like-minded and, thus, can't string together a political film persuasive enough to make a real difference.
October 2, 2009
Smart-alecky and simplistic? Yeah. And primo Moore.
October 2, 2009
As a filmmaker creating a product for a marketplace, supported by profit-seeking investors, he obviously has some comfort level with capitalism in the sense of doing business.
October 2, 2009
Michael Moore is up to his old tricks in Capitalism: A Love Story, and that's sure to both infuriate, and entertain and inform, depending which side of the Michael Moore fence you stand on.
October 2, 2009
While it's amusing to watch Moore on camera plaster the entrance to the New York Stock Exchange with crime-scene tape, when Moore goes through his customary security-guard harassment in another segment, it's hard not to think: Here we go again.
October 2, 2009
In a movie long on symbols, dead peasants are the most egregious, but a close second would be the rah-rah "confidential" Citibank memo about the United States having become a "plutonomy."
October 2, 2009
Like most of his movies, this will probably make your blood boil, but it functions at a level of such blubbering emotionality that it might as well be a Glenn Beck rant.
October 2, 2009
Moore is much better at indicting culprits than providing solutions.
October 2, 2009
The result is a film that stands as one of Moore's finest arguments. It's also one of his funniest, if you accept that the jokes are all of the gritted-teeth variety.
October 1, 2009
The script gradually becomes an ambiguous mixture of hope and desperation; at times it feels almost bipartisan in its politics.
October 1, 2009
In passages, the movie is eloquent. In sum, it is scattershot. Organization is not Moore's strongest suit; indignation is.
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