Castle in the Sky Reviews

  • 4d ago

    Another beautifully animated and high quality film from Miyazaki, with all of his characteristic elements - a young girl who is the 'chosen one', a young boy who may or may not be a love interest, incredible worldbuilding, a charismatic old woman, flying, and a mustachioed villain. This one may not be at the top of everyone's personal list of Ghibli films, but it is still an exceptional piece of filmmaking that only serves to solidify the studio's position as an all-time great in the medium. (4.5/5)

    Another beautifully animated and high quality film from Miyazaki, with all of his characteristic elements - a young girl who is the 'chosen one', a young boy who may or may not be a love interest, incredible worldbuilding, a charismatic old woman, flying, and a mustachioed villain. This one may not be at the top of everyone's personal list of Ghibli films, but it is still an exceptional piece of filmmaking that only serves to solidify the studio's position as an all-time great in the medium. (4.5/5)

  • Nov 12, 2020

    Watched it once, and plan on seeing it again. A magical movie, from early Ghibli. Miyazaki is downright amazing, one of the best ever in the animation industry. His work doesn't get the praise it demands.

    Watched it once, and plan on seeing it again. A magical movie, from early Ghibli. Miyazaki is downright amazing, one of the best ever in the animation industry. His work doesn't get the praise it demands.

  • Nov 11, 2020

    The first half of the movie is very slow but once it gets going it's pretty good. It's got all the charm I expected from Studio Ghibli and the stakes never feel too high. Unfortunately Sheeta ends up being more of a plot device and less of a character - I think she might take one deliberate action the entire movie. The rest is just her being moved from place to place and everyone else doing things around her. It feels a bit misogynistic at times as traditional roles are forced upon her. The environmental allegories are pretty obvious but it's still a nice message. Since this is a classic Ghibli film I have to recommend it, but be sure to adjust your expectations for the time in which it was made.

    The first half of the movie is very slow but once it gets going it's pretty good. It's got all the charm I expected from Studio Ghibli and the stakes never feel too high. Unfortunately Sheeta ends up being more of a plot device and less of a character - I think she might take one deliberate action the entire movie. The rest is just her being moved from place to place and everyone else doing things around her. It feels a bit misogynistic at times as traditional roles are forced upon her. The environmental allegories are pretty obvious but it's still a nice message. Since this is a classic Ghibli film I have to recommend it, but be sure to adjust your expectations for the time in which it was made.

  • Jan 23, 2020

    I’m all for movies that do their best to show and not tell, but my big frustration with Castle in the Sky is that it seems to have adopted the philosophy of show and then tell. The movie starts off and I felt like I was jumping in the middle of a story, almost like I turned on episode 5 of a television series without seeing the 4 that came before. I kept hoping it would slow down for even a few minutes so I could get to know any of the characters. But it was almost 30 minutes or more before they even took a moment to establish their identities, and even longer before I managed to care about them at all. I think it was when they started to work on the pirate ship that I finally found myself laughing with them and enjoying the film. Even then I didn’t feel like the protagonists had much personality to them. It was almost like having two generic kids filling those main roles, and their only defining characteristics came from their situation rather than their personality traits. Then they hit the titular Castle in the Sky and everything stops. The exposition dump is excessive at this point of Castle in the Sky, and we aren’t allowed to figure out anything for ourselves. This is the inevitable moment in the Miyazaki movie where he gets onto his soapbox about anti-war and environmentalism, which always takes me out of the movie, particularly when it feels like all story-telling halts in order to make the point. Once the plot gets moving again, I was on board for the action sequences, and I enjoyed watching the heroes fight back against the villain. The climax was a bit predictable since they so blatantly foreshadowed it, but the journey to that epic conclusion was thrilling. One final note, I am usually all about watching these anime films with the English dubbing, because I think they get solid actors and make it work brilliantly, but Anna Paquin and James Van Der Beek basically ruin this one. I kind of despised their performances, and would recommend you watch the subtitled version instead, even though that means missing great work from the likes of Mark Hamill and Cloris Leachman. My final assessment of Castle in the Sky is lukewarm. I didn’t dislike it as much as most other Miyazaki films, but I wasn’t all that enamored with it either.

    I’m all for movies that do their best to show and not tell, but my big frustration with Castle in the Sky is that it seems to have adopted the philosophy of show and then tell. The movie starts off and I felt like I was jumping in the middle of a story, almost like I turned on episode 5 of a television series without seeing the 4 that came before. I kept hoping it would slow down for even a few minutes so I could get to know any of the characters. But it was almost 30 minutes or more before they even took a moment to establish their identities, and even longer before I managed to care about them at all. I think it was when they started to work on the pirate ship that I finally found myself laughing with them and enjoying the film. Even then I didn’t feel like the protagonists had much personality to them. It was almost like having two generic kids filling those main roles, and their only defining characteristics came from their situation rather than their personality traits. Then they hit the titular Castle in the Sky and everything stops. The exposition dump is excessive at this point of Castle in the Sky, and we aren’t allowed to figure out anything for ourselves. This is the inevitable moment in the Miyazaki movie where he gets onto his soapbox about anti-war and environmentalism, which always takes me out of the movie, particularly when it feels like all story-telling halts in order to make the point. Once the plot gets moving again, I was on board for the action sequences, and I enjoyed watching the heroes fight back against the villain. The climax was a bit predictable since they so blatantly foreshadowed it, but the journey to that epic conclusion was thrilling. One final note, I am usually all about watching these anime films with the English dubbing, because I think they get solid actors and make it work brilliantly, but Anna Paquin and James Van Der Beek basically ruin this one. I kind of despised their performances, and would recommend you watch the subtitled version instead, even though that means missing great work from the likes of Mark Hamill and Cloris Leachman. My final assessment of Castle in the Sky is lukewarm. I didn’t dislike it as much as most other Miyazaki films, but I wasn’t all that enamored with it either.

  • Sep 24, 2019

    I don’t know man...It started slow, and it’s kinda slow, but as you may come to expect it’s pretty. Also so cool cultural stuff happening.

    I don’t know man...It started slow, and it’s kinda slow, but as you may come to expect it’s pretty. Also so cool cultural stuff happening.

  • Erica
    Sep 02, 2019

    Beautiful scenery, unique story

    Beautiful scenery, unique story

  • Kiefer-Laurent
    Jun 06, 2019

    Finally got to see one of my all time favorites on the big screen. Masterpiece. No other way to describe it.

    Finally got to see one of my all time favorites on the big screen. Masterpiece. No other way to describe it.

  • May 04, 2019

    Interesting action movie by Miyazaki with beautiful visuals and soundtrack

    Interesting action movie by Miyazaki with beautiful visuals and soundtrack

  • May 03, 2019

    I rarely watch Japanese animes because they are mostly lack of good stories, awesome animations, etc. Most of Japanese animes I saw were kind of dramas, the animations are very bad and characters are so ugly. Moreover, the stories are not that strong to be my taste. So, I always avoid Japanese animes. I just said that I don't watch Japanese animes, it doesn't mean I don't see one. Some local TV channels in my country air Japanese animes and so, I sometimes see them and didn't like them because the stories are very bad. Laputa: The Castle in the Sky is the first Japanese anime I watched and also it's the only one I loved. When I saw this anime on a website, the reason why I decided was two main characters were kind of cute and lovely. So, I watched it and I loved it. The story is not so simple and not so complicated. But because of the director, it turned out to be a good one. What I love about this anime is how Sheeta and the leader of those pirates became friends. I don't like the castle though. The castle is kind of ruined. Maybe it's because it is ruined in the story. So, the anime creators did like that. But it still works. The anime was produced in 1986 (way before I was born) but the quality is unbelievably good. I haven't a clue before I saw it's production year. When I saw it, I can't believe it because the anime is too good. What I love most is the end credit song. That song is so cool. All in all, for some people, the anime might be kind of inferior to those ones produced in 20th centuries but as for me, it's the best Japanese anime I've ever seen. It's totally worth spending time.

    I rarely watch Japanese animes because they are mostly lack of good stories, awesome animations, etc. Most of Japanese animes I saw were kind of dramas, the animations are very bad and characters are so ugly. Moreover, the stories are not that strong to be my taste. So, I always avoid Japanese animes. I just said that I don't watch Japanese animes, it doesn't mean I don't see one. Some local TV channels in my country air Japanese animes and so, I sometimes see them and didn't like them because the stories are very bad. Laputa: The Castle in the Sky is the first Japanese anime I watched and also it's the only one I loved. When I saw this anime on a website, the reason why I decided was two main characters were kind of cute and lovely. So, I watched it and I loved it. The story is not so simple and not so complicated. But because of the director, it turned out to be a good one. What I love about this anime is how Sheeta and the leader of those pirates became friends. I don't like the castle though. The castle is kind of ruined. Maybe it's because it is ruined in the story. So, the anime creators did like that. But it still works. The anime was produced in 1986 (way before I was born) but the quality is unbelievably good. I haven't a clue before I saw it's production year. When I saw it, I can't believe it because the anime is too good. What I love most is the end credit song. That song is so cool. All in all, for some people, the anime might be kind of inferior to those ones produced in 20th centuries but as for me, it's the best Japanese anime I've ever seen. It's totally worth spending time.

  • Apr 26, 2019

    Air pirates, army and government agents wants to abduct Sheeta, a girl with mysterious necklace with crystal pendant. She meets boy by the name of Pazu who plans to construct a plane and set off in search for the flying city of Laputa. During the movie we learn that in the past mankind mastered the technology which enabled construction of flying cities, but after an unnamed disaster survivors continued to live on the ground. The story of this anime is very easygoing and tender, but at the same time it opens up very serious issues concerning the relationship of man and civilization towards nature, while rethinking the essence of modern development and what is usually accepted as progress. It's easy to notice similarity between the shape of the central tree that dominates Laputa, a symbol of prosperity, harmony and security, and the atomic mushroom created by the main weapon of this flying city. On the example of Laputa we can expose fundamental contradictions of imperialism / world system: Laputa is a paradise for those who live in it (in the centre of the world system), while at the same time it's bringing destruction to those who live on the ground (on the periphery of the world system). Equally important contradiction can be also seen in relation of the civilization towards the planet: while we are hypocritically promoting recycling and separating the glass, plastic and paper, at the same time corporations annually cut down between three and six billion trees, without any serious social resistance or critique. Laputa shows that harmful effects of technology are consequences of the choice of those who control the technology to use it in this way, or to simply ignore warnings and its harmful aspects. They appropriate benefits of technology for themselves, while transferring (externalizing) harm and problems to the rest of society. Miyazaki, the master of animation who grew up in postwar Japan, is careful not to opt for one of the sides in the false dilemma "technology or nature" and uses the metaphor of Laputa to construct a positive reference point against which we can critically observe our society. The name Laputa comes from Swift's novel Gulliver's Travels, where exists a flying island of the same name whose residents use their technology for political domination. Political will for domination through technological superiority marked not only the twentieth century, but also of the previous millennia of civilization development. Laputa sends us the message that a sustainable civilization must renounce war as a way of life, and especially imperialism as inherently destructive social form. Laputa creates a longing in us to realise a balance between nature and technology - a society that will achieve symbiotic unity of the ecosphere and the technosphere.

    Air pirates, army and government agents wants to abduct Sheeta, a girl with mysterious necklace with crystal pendant. She meets boy by the name of Pazu who plans to construct a plane and set off in search for the flying city of Laputa. During the movie we learn that in the past mankind mastered the technology which enabled construction of flying cities, but after an unnamed disaster survivors continued to live on the ground. The story of this anime is very easygoing and tender, but at the same time it opens up very serious issues concerning the relationship of man and civilization towards nature, while rethinking the essence of modern development and what is usually accepted as progress. It's easy to notice similarity between the shape of the central tree that dominates Laputa, a symbol of prosperity, harmony and security, and the atomic mushroom created by the main weapon of this flying city. On the example of Laputa we can expose fundamental contradictions of imperialism / world system: Laputa is a paradise for those who live in it (in the centre of the world system), while at the same time it's bringing destruction to those who live on the ground (on the periphery of the world system). Equally important contradiction can be also seen in relation of the civilization towards the planet: while we are hypocritically promoting recycling and separating the glass, plastic and paper, at the same time corporations annually cut down between three and six billion trees, without any serious social resistance or critique. Laputa shows that harmful effects of technology are consequences of the choice of those who control the technology to use it in this way, or to simply ignore warnings and its harmful aspects. They appropriate benefits of technology for themselves, while transferring (externalizing) harm and problems to the rest of society. Miyazaki, the master of animation who grew up in postwar Japan, is careful not to opt for one of the sides in the false dilemma "technology or nature" and uses the metaphor of Laputa to construct a positive reference point against which we can critically observe our society. The name Laputa comes from Swift's novel Gulliver's Travels, where exists a flying island of the same name whose residents use their technology for political domination. Political will for domination through technological superiority marked not only the twentieth century, but also of the previous millennia of civilization development. Laputa sends us the message that a sustainable civilization must renounce war as a way of life, and especially imperialism as inherently destructive social form. Laputa creates a longing in us to realise a balance between nature and technology - a society that will achieve symbiotic unity of the ecosphere and the technosphere.