Reviews

  • Nov 13, 2015

    Great visuals, but wasn't it out of order?

    Great visuals, but wasn't it out of order?

  • Feb 22, 2014

    Impressive, but a bit generic.

    Impressive, but a bit generic.

  • Mar 22, 2013

    Definitely more IMAX-y than Fricke's later work, which often makes it more bland, but also results it a few over-the-top visually intense scenes.

    Definitely more IMAX-y than Fricke's later work, which often makes it more bland, but also results it a few over-the-top visually intense scenes.

  • Mar 04, 2013

    Good movie. Definitely a prelude to Baraka, but it's enjoyable.

    Good movie. Definitely a prelude to Baraka, but it's enjoyable.

  • Aug 03, 2012

    HD landscape porn in the same vein as Koyaanisqatsi and Baraka, with the heavy social and environmental themes mostly cut away. Featuring an emphasis on staggering time-lapse photography, plus an understated, excellently-timed ambient score, it's a great way to shut off your brain, kick back and let your entertainment center stretch its legs. The regular, ambitious shifts in locale took me around the world and back in less than an hour, lingering just long enough to trap the breath in my throat with one stunning panorama after another. A spectacular, timeless, moving photo book that makes for terrific light viewing.

    HD landscape porn in the same vein as Koyaanisqatsi and Baraka, with the heavy social and environmental themes mostly cut away. Featuring an emphasis on staggering time-lapse photography, plus an understated, excellently-timed ambient score, it's a great way to shut off your brain, kick back and let your entertainment center stretch its legs. The regular, ambitious shifts in locale took me around the world and back in less than an hour, lingering just long enough to trap the breath in my throat with one stunning panorama after another. A spectacular, timeless, moving photo book that makes for terrific light viewing.

  • May 29, 2012

    Beautifully captivating for just over 40 minutes with stunning natural photography and unique camera/editing techniques. Loses a star for some head-scratching moments of how Ron Fricke decided to place certain sequences within the structure of his film (i.e., the first time we see NYC traffic flows is a jarring edit between scenes of natural beauty).

    Beautifully captivating for just over 40 minutes with stunning natural photography and unique camera/editing techniques. Loses a star for some head-scratching moments of how Ron Fricke decided to place certain sequences within the structure of his film (i.e., the first time we see NYC traffic flows is a jarring edit between scenes of natural beauty).

  • Apr 28, 2012

    Just watched the Blu Ray transfer of this amazing 70mm film! Made in 1984, by famed cameraman Ron Fricke. Just mind blowing beauty on a HD television. Highly recommend! Can not believe this is nearly 30 years old!

    Just watched the Blu Ray transfer of this amazing 70mm film! Made in 1984, by famed cameraman Ron Fricke. Just mind blowing beauty on a HD television. Highly recommend! Can not believe this is nearly 30 years old!

  • Dec 07, 2011

    Ron Fricke has been involved in a number of these visuals driven documentaries and they are all truly beautiful to look at and have a thought provoking effect on the viewer. Chronos suffers from having better forays into this field before and after it (in the guises of Koyaanisqatsi and Baraka) but it still makes for a diverting interesting experience. It is rather short (at a little over 40 minutes) but this means that the scenes remain fresh and there is less of a feeling of repetitiveness that some of the other movies can have. There is an interesting score, very different in style to Fricke's other movies, which adds to the imagery which here, seems mostly concerned with civilisation. One slight disappointment is the appearance of a number of scenes that make use of the same locations and cinema techniques as Koyaanisqatsi which feels unnecessary and slightly jarring to the flow of the narrative which otherwise has a unique flavour. I especially enjoyed the sequences filmed on and around Mont St. Michel and the hight speed boat trips around Paris and Venice. Although, in my opinion, not the best of Fricke's work, Chronos is different enough to make it interesting and, in common with his other films, is a real gem to look at.

    Ron Fricke has been involved in a number of these visuals driven documentaries and they are all truly beautiful to look at and have a thought provoking effect on the viewer. Chronos suffers from having better forays into this field before and after it (in the guises of Koyaanisqatsi and Baraka) but it still makes for a diverting interesting experience. It is rather short (at a little over 40 minutes) but this means that the scenes remain fresh and there is less of a feeling of repetitiveness that some of the other movies can have. There is an interesting score, very different in style to Fricke's other movies, which adds to the imagery which here, seems mostly concerned with civilisation. One slight disappointment is the appearance of a number of scenes that make use of the same locations and cinema techniques as Koyaanisqatsi which feels unnecessary and slightly jarring to the flow of the narrative which otherwise has a unique flavour. I especially enjoyed the sequences filmed on and around Mont St. Michel and the hight speed boat trips around Paris and Venice. Although, in my opinion, not the best of Fricke's work, Chronos is different enough to make it interesting and, in common with his other films, is a real gem to look at.

  • Sep 17, 2011

    I'm a fan of time-lapse movies and this one is top notch. Should give a minus for 80s hairdos and clothing, though :D

    I'm a fan of time-lapse movies and this one is top notch. Should give a minus for 80s hairdos and clothing, though :D

  • Sep 09, 2011

    The gorgeous cinematography lends itself well to the time-lapse photography prevalent throughout, whether we observe clouds rolling through a canyon or pedestrians visiting a cathedral. Michael Stearns' music is intense at times while relaxed at others, allowing you to observe the visuals while getting a sense for the atmosphere of the location.

    The gorgeous cinematography lends itself well to the time-lapse photography prevalent throughout, whether we observe clouds rolling through a canyon or pedestrians visiting a cathedral. Michael Stearns' music is intense at times while relaxed at others, allowing you to observe the visuals while getting a sense for the atmosphere of the location.