Coming Out - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Coming Out Reviews

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½ April 1, 2017
A deeply moving film about the difficulties of asserting a gay identity in a conformist society (way beyond the socialist background). One of the last great DEFA production, shot just before the fall of the Berlin Wall.
October 1, 2014
Excellent German Film on the gay life on East Germany in 1989.
August 10, 2012
Although a period piece and insightful glimpse into urban East Germany just as the Berlin Wall came down, this film moves at a glacial pace, and much of the acting alternates between the wooden and overly-dramatic.

The best performance, in my opinion, was given by Werner Dissel, an elderly gay gentleman who relates his tragic early years during WWII.

This film, made in 1989, was definitely NOT "pre-AIDS" as another reviewer stated.
May 12, 2012
This movie touches the heart and shows how difficult it is to come out of the closet. It has a strange ending, I must say!
½ May 12, 2012
Lo interesante de este film, es ver coo se vivia la homosexualidad en la Alemania Oriental por los años 80s. El resto, es un película bastante floja con una trama básica pero con algunos buenos momentos, sobre todo como indaga en el conflicto de su protagonista.
May 12, 2012
Gay Berlin! Significant of the East West divide in Germany. Just what the title says a man's coming out.
½ May 12, 2012
this is a powerful little film that is hard to find. so if you get a chance to see it, watch it. it may be pre-aids, but there's plenty that is timely.
May 12, 2012
Premier film est-allemand sur le sujet, tourné juste avant la chute du Mur. Historiquement important et joliment timide .
May 12, 2012
My first and only foray into real East German cinema. Based on those who knew the DDR, it seems to be quite authentic. Not a tremendous film, but a decent one, with some touching moments.
May 12, 2012
If you ignore the gay scenes, and if you really ignore the gay scenes, this film gives the greatest portrayal out of any GDR film I have seen that really shows what East Berlin truly looked and felt like. Not to mention this film was made only months before the fall of the Berlin Wall. In the opening scene, the main character rides a bicycle through the streets, and you get to see what East Berlin actually looked like, instead of what state propaganda films showed. Completely fascinating. If you ignore the gay scenes, that is.
May 12, 2012
I commend the valiant effort of whoever put the film together, and I'm sure it was a work of love. However, unfortunately, sometimes the best wishes are not enough to produce something good and watchable. The movie has too many jumps that we are expected to fill in without enough knowledge of the characters or the circumstances. Somehow, I felt confused a lot of the time because I wasn't sure if what I was watching was the future, the present, or the past.

Didn't like it at all, do not recommend it!
May 12, 2012
The only gay movie made in GDR, shown first in public the 8th of November 1989 - only hours before the Berlinb wall was down
May 12, 2012
As others have mentioned, this film is historically important. I loved the opportunity to glimpse life within the GDR in general. It was also illuminating to gain a bit of insight into the perceptions of the GDR filmmakers regarding the challenges of being gay in communist Germany. I would not recommend this film for entertainment purposes...
May 12, 2012
I love this one more for its historical value, being the only DDR openly gay movie (it premiered on 9 November 1989). Features authentic locations and offers a peak into the gay life of East Berlin.
May 12, 2012
Sød lille østtysk drama om to mænds forelskelse. Temmelig kedelig!
½ May 12, 2012
Sweet drama about gay love in the former DDR, portraying dayly life, and not the system. Due to historical coincidence (the Wall fell during the cut-down) it immediately became a document of a time that is definitely past. Still, the strength of this movie is that it simply shows daily life -- in the DDR, and at the same time profoundly universal.
May 12, 2012
I saw this movie in a film class about the cold war, and along with Dr. Strangelove, this film really stuck out for me. It's about a young teacher in East Germany struggling with his homosexuality. It was really emotional and personal, something I think many people would relate to and enjoy. It made me cry.
May 12, 2012
Twenty years on, and I stumble upon this film on Youtube, where someone has posted it in its entirety. What a serendipitous find!
Heiner Carow (of ??The Legend of Paul and Paula?? [1973] fame), was a director well-known for putting off the East German authorities with his realistic, sincere portrayals of everyday life in a socialist country. Through the decades of his career he put Flower Power, rock music, and the transformative power of romantic love (even in the face of grim, drab reality) on the big screens of the GDR, giving those themes the attention and legitimacy they were essentially denied by the state.
In 1989, his subject is homosexuality: in the first and only East German film to openly deal with the issue, ??Coming Out?? portrays a young man torn between the woman carrying his child and the man with whom he has fallen in love. Philipp (Matthias Freihof), a young high school teacher, meets a colleague, Tanja (Dagmar Manzel), a shy girl who falls hard for him, and before you know it, they are living together and she??s nibbling on pickled cucumbers straight from the jar, dreamily contemplating his naked physique while he sleeps. He genuinely cares for her, but then he meets a boy who also falls hard for him, and soon has to grapple with his conflicting desires and repressions, and come to terms with who he really is.
It??s a passionate and moving story, honestly told, and Carow avoids any sensationalism or melodrama. In his commitment to authenticity, the gay locales he chose were real gay hangouts, clubs, and bars, and much of the background action is genuine, not staged. Many of the film's supporting characters are actual members of the underground gay cabaret scene of East Berlin, essentially playing themselves.
Ultimately, this film is a film about love and honesty, and a powerful plea for tolerance, not only for the gay community, but for all minorities in East Germany at the time. It also offers a rare glimpse of the realities of life in East Berlin just before the fall of the Wall in November 1989 (when it was released). If you enjoyed ??The Lives of Others,?? where the era was artificially recreated, check out this film to see what it really looked like.
May 12, 2012
Relatively unconvincing, but you'd have to be a total dope not to admire its sincerity. The lead is dreamy beyond belief.
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