Como Era Gostoso o Meu Francês (How Tasty Was My Little Frenchman) - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Como Era Gostoso o Meu Francês (How Tasty Was My Little Frenchman) Reviews

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Super Reviewer
½ January 2, 2017
It draws more attention for the cheesy makeup and how everyone appears fully naked onscreen considering the time it was made (during Brazilian dictatorship with its filthy censorship), but apart from that the film is more a curious history lesson made in a welcome naturalistic style.
December 25, 2013
Very strange film works well as a curiosity, but not much more.
November 30, 2012
86%

"In this country no Governor, no Bishop or other authority could please God, Our Lord for the evil is much impregnated in the customs."-Father Nobrega
½ December 29, 2011
I don't care. I don't think it's that good...despite all the nudity.
½ October 12, 2011
NOT a 70's "cannibal horror" film, but a fascinating period piece about a 16th century Frenchman, captured by Brazilian natives who mistake him for one their (and his) Portuguese enemies. Very well done. Touches of humor, but feels almost like an ethnography. Attention to detail, to the point that most of the dialogue is in the native Tupi language. Well worth a look.
½ January 9, 2011
Reminded me a bit of EL TOPO, as someone below mentions, but far less interesting.
½ August 15, 2010
How Tasty Was My Little Frenchman (1973) Come Era Gostoso O Meu Frances (1971) short film 80 minutes. Though this is not a documentary it seems like a documentary because of the harsh lighting and some what poor production values ( by todays standards). This is a film that Werner Herzog would have made in 1970. (was he making documentaries then?) Almost all of the dialogue in the film was written in the Tupi language. The actors and actresses who portrayed the Tupinambas wore historically correct attire resulting in a considerable amount of historically correct nudity and semi-nudity in ALL scenes. "How Tasty Was My Little Frenchman" is the first absolutely non-exploitative (not nonerotic) movie I have seen to require almost total nudity from its cast, both sexes. The primary point of the film is to show us the 16th century culture clash of Europeans and native South Americans but because this is a Brazilian film it's impossible to ignore any attendant political criticism of European colonial practices during that period of history (the film-makers should have taken a hearty bite out of the Spanish while they were at it) Excellent film and great look at a world that no longer exists. A Frenchman is captured by the Tupinambas Indians. They want to eat him but decide to keep him for a while and they also provide him with a wife. He adopts and joins their culture. The directors film Vidas Secas also is a wonderful unusual film. SEE MY Lists: I have 5 lists of foreign films submitted for Foreign Oscar best film (by year) I have new list of foriegn films submitted for best foreign film for 2009 (Feb 2010 Oscars) four stars. almost five stars. Fascinating film.
½ August 15, 2010
This movie is weird. Overkill on the nudity, and underkill on the plot. Has some OK points, but not recommended.
February 12, 2010
Native cannibals take sides as the French and Portuguese fight for control over Brazil. Interesting anthropological movie that could have been really good if the production levels weren't so low.
January 8, 2010
A classic 1970s Brazilian film based on an account by a German who was captive to the Tupi-Namba on the coast of Brazil in the 16th century. Film focuses on the experience of a European captive who knows his eventual fate is to be cannibalized. Although fictionalized, it is not romanticized, and they leave a lot of questions "hanging" -- like, what exactly *is* his wife feeling at the end? Much of the dialogue is in Tupi with subtitles. Extensive nudity, as the actors dress as early colonial Tupi-Namba.
½ December 24, 2009
REVIEW: "COMO ERA GOSTOSO O MEU FRANCÃ?S" (released in the US as "How Tasty Was My Little Frenchman"): Famous Brazilian arthouse film from 1973 is something of a "culture clash" black comedy by way of an anthropological study, recounting how certain Brazilian tribes back in the 16th Century had the habit of enslaving then eating captured Europeans to absorb their power. The film is by Nelson Pereira dos Santos, director of "Vidas Secas".
October 2, 2009
WEB. Fascinante historia que es tanto una muestra bastante irónica de los choques entre culturas en el cotexto de guerras de conquista, como una oda a la impermanencia de las épocas y sus gentes. / Fascinating story that is a quite ironic look at a culture clash in the context of conquest wars, as much as an ode to the impermanence of times and their peoples,
½ September 28, 2009
How Tasty Was My Little Frenchman (1973) Come Era Gostoso O Meu Frances (1971) short film 80 minutes. Though this is not a documentary it seems like a documentary because of the harsh lighting and some what poor production values ( by todays standards). This is a film that Werner Herzog would have made in 1970. (was he making documentaries then?) Almost all of the dialogue in the film was written in the Tupi language. The actors and actresses who portrayed the Tupinambas wore historically correct attire resulting in a considerable amount of historically correct nudity and semi-nudity in ALL scenes. "How Tasty Was My Little Frenchman" is the first absolutely non-exploitative (not nonerotic) movie I have seen to require almost total nudity from its cast, both sexes. The primary point of the film is to show us the 16th century culture clash of Europeans and native South Americans but because this is a Brazilian film it's impossible to ignore any attendant political criticism of European colonial practices during that period of history (the film-makers should have taken a hearty bite out of the Spanish while they were at it) Excellent film and great look at a world that no longer exists. A Frenchman is captured by the Tupinambas Indians. They want to eat him but decide to keep him for a while and they also provide him with a wife. He adopts and joins their culture. The directors film Vidas Secas also is a wonderful unusual film. SEE MY Lists: I have 5 lists of foreign films submitted for Foreign Oscar best film (by year) I have new list of foriegn films submitted for best foreign film for 2009 (Feb 2010 Oscars) four stars. almost five stars. Fascinating film.
May 18, 2009
Omigod, so boring. With an annoying music score to boot. Watch in mute and just read the subtitles if you must.
April 20, 2009
Surprisingly good film about the first meetings native americans in Brasil and europeans.
March 2, 2009
I was hardly aware of the time in history depicted in this 1971 Brazilian black comedy, however that is not to say it wasn't accessible to me because the movie makes it very clear. It's set in 16th century Brazil, where rival French and Portuguese settlers are exploiting the indigineous people as confederates in their battle to assert dominance. What is particularly interesting about the movie is that it is made by the Portuguese from the point of view of the French. The hero is a likable Frenchman, the Portuguese are barbarians, and the rest of the French are oppressive and greedy. The film's Portuguese makers are objective because when all is said and done, we see that it makes no difference whose side one takes. It's about heredity overpowered by environment in a time starkly defined by tribes. Enemies are made and perpetuated, and like so, the environmental integration never progresses.

A Frenchman is captured by the Portuguese is then captured by an indigenous tribe, the Tupinambas, after they massacre a group of Portuguese. The tribe's shaman predicted they would find a strong Portuguese man to cannibalize as revenge for the chief's brother being killed by a Portugeuse musket ball. Thinking the Frenchman is Portuguese, they believe they now have one. Nevertheless, the Frenchman is granted unrestrained course of the village, is sooner or later given a wife, and assumes their accustomed appearance rather than his Western clothes, or any clothes. Another Frenchman comes to the village and tells the tribe that their prisoner is indeed Portuguese, then assures the incensed Frenchman that he will tell them the truth when the Frenchman finds a secret treasure trove that another European has hidden nearby.

I found the opening scene funny, because its narration apposed with its contradictions on- screen serve as great satire, even if the movie didn't seem to want to maintain that tone very much more often. It's actually not a terribly riveting film. The bountiful, essential locale, fierce way of life and ripened native women make not only the Frenchman, but us, too, forget any threat, and we have the feeling of him as a free man. It should not be that terribly hard to escape. The cannibalism is as scarce of desire as the full-frontal nudity of the cast, suggested in lieu as the representative core of Pereira dos Santos's dry political cartoon of New World mythology and undeveloped social coherence. At any rate, this 1500s-era social commentary, shot on location at a bay with 365 islands, played almost entirely nude and almost entirely written in Tupi, encourages effective breakdown of established ways which are topical because they've repeated themselves for centuries.
½ January 21, 2009
Dos Santos films are some of the most regretfully hard to come by in the entire catalog of Latin American must-sees. The playful beauty and paradoxical humour of this film--in terms of concept as well as culminating, radical-scenographic portrayal--strikes the attentive viewer with an experience of sheer mysticality rooted, no less, in factual, historical phenomena. It is certainly no error that this film was once included in the top 50 entries of a popular list of 100 greatest films from Latin America by writers for the New York Times. Nor is it a mistake that Alejandro Jodorowsky's El Topo, containing certain obvious stylistic parallels in intense imagery and hyperbolic irony, was among the same ranks. Although cinema novo pioneer and elaborator Dos Santos may remain manifestly opposed to such exposure, for the common North American viewer to have access to such a decidedly anti-Hollywood film (not to mention one of its cousins, Vidas Secas) thru Netflix, for instance, surely constitutes at least a subcategory of modern miribilia. The sympathetic yet iconoclastic presentation of the Tupinamba as circumstantially naive, archaic upstarts displaying, in all their unique grandeur, the same bellicose tendencies as their impending Portuguese exterminators--yet, also, as a culture and people retaining as much rightful lease upon existence as those more "civilized" exponents of European decent--highly qualifies Como Era Gostoso o Meu Frances as a film metaphorically, literally, even quite literately about the cannibalism of culture(s). As such, it is particularly relevant today in light of innumerable, uncontacted tribes that still exist in South America along with all that is anthropologically sacred (however crude) becoming gradually defiled at the hands of mass-disseminated ethnocentrism.

A fairly rare treat.
January 6, 2009
i never know where my cinematic adventures will take me and i ended up with this. having seen hour of the star i was intriguied by dos santos. this was very well done but was a bit much for me. heavy in content and in penises. lots and lots of penises. perhaps it was the alleghory or the colonial satire or the penises, but i just didnt like it. however, along with the penises were lots and lots of hot aborginal boobies. how old am i?
December 15, 2008
The positive reviews below are shockingly good. I suppose it's the kind of movie smart people like.

At this point, I wonder if it's a mistake to concentrate, as the 'extra' from a Columbia prof does, on the allegorical political content of the film (it's, as he argued, a clever critique of Brazil's dictatorship). Instead, I think we ought to wonder about why it is that *we* want to see this: depending on who this 'we' is, the desire to see a Frenchman get eaten is worth thinking about. Would be excellent to use in a class with some William Arens (although the suggestion below to pair to with Aguirre is also an excellent one).
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