Confucius - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Confucius Reviews

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February 13, 2016
Review:
Although this movie is full of fast subtitles, I really enjoyed this epic biopic about a man who stuck to his morals to the end. The acting is superb from Chow Yun Fat and the authentic scenery was brilliant. The only problem that I really found with the movie is that I lost the plot after a while. I didn't really know who was who and what they were fighting for. With that aside, I did get caught up with the emotional side of the movie and the relationships that Confucius had with his trusty disciples. Personally, I didn't know anything about Confucius before seeing this movie, so I was intrigued with his epic journey, from his early 50's until his death at 73 years old. The whole political side of the film, went way over my head but I was still able to enjoy the emotional journey. The director brought different elements to the project which will give you mixed emotions throughout the movie, so it definitely gets the thumbs up from me. Enjoyable!

Round-Up:
This is the first international movie, written and directed by Mei Hu and she really did pick the ultimate legend to portray. As Confucius isn't worldwide known, this movie did go under the radar but Chow Yun Fat's popular name pulled in audiences. Its definitely a movie that I would watch again but I would need a dubbed version, so I wouldn't have to concentrate on the fast subtitles.

Budget: N/A
Worldwide Gross: $18.6million

I recommend this movie to people who are into their biography/drama/history movies starring Chow Yun-Fat, Xun Zhou, Jianbin Chen and Quan Ren. 6/10
May 25, 2015
The tyranny within these walls put tigers to shame.

The Chinese eastern philosopher, Confucius, is banned from his home city due to his beliefs and direction. He bands with another dynasty and helps defend a city from an invading tyrant. He hopes to restore his city's trust and one day return. Meanwhile, as he defends the city, he discovers those inside may be no more worthy of the city and its walls than those trying to invade.

"In times of war we need generals. In time of trouble we need thinkers."

Mei Hu, director of Army Nurse and On the Other Side of the Bridge, delivers Confucius. The storyline for this picture is well paced and contains a nice mix of action and character interaction with interesting dialogue. The acting is above average and the cast includes Chow Yun-Fat and Xun Zhou.

"A diligent student needs no teacher."

I came across this on Netflix and thought the premise and main character had potential. This was interesting and worth watching, but wasn't as good as similar films like Ip Man, Hero, and House of the Flying Daggers. Overall, I recommend seeing this if you're a fan of the genre but I wouldn't add it to my DVD collection.

"Every great achievement is balanced by a great loss."

Grade: C+
½ May 24, 2015
Lavish cinematography is the highlight of this movie. It is difficult to bring a philosopher's life to screen and make it interesting. He doesn't do much but think and teach. The war scenes are CGI, with the participants looking more like ants than people in the long shots. Yun-Fat gives his usual professional performance. It is too long - they could have had less scenes from the wandering years. Again, the colors and locations make it worth your time.
May 19, 2015
An epic telling of the life of Confucius. Both Chow Yun-Fat and Zhou Xun did a great job, although the movie is not without weaknesses.
June 17, 2014
don't really get the idea why Confucius is worth following. I mean, from the objctive point of view.
April 22, 2014
Slow, overly dramatic and trying FAR too hard to be a war epic when it's supposed to be about a scholar/philosopher. Well played by Chow Yun Fat - but other than that, not really great.
½ February 26, 2014
good bio-pic costume drama
February 23, 2014
Could have been much better, it wasn't as inspiring as it should have been
January 3, 2014
This life of Confucius shows his early life as a politician and difficult life in exile -- and while the movie does drag on, it does so in a philosophical way, though I thought was longer than 3 hours.
December 12, 2013
I loved this movie although, I thought I would like to hear more philosophy of Confucius, it was a beautiful movie
November 15, 2013
Since this was one of those biopics that tried to tell the whole story it was forced to also tell the boring part of his life (while he was in exile).
½ September 17, 2013
Do you know anything about the teachings of Confucius? Well this movie will teach you that he liked bowing. He really like bowing. Confucius loved bowing
July 28, 2013
A strong philosophical tale, Confucius is a political drama with a bit of wisdom. Chow Yun Fat plays the titular role well, and the movie has a lot to offer. Debates, battle scenes, and a few scenes of beauty are littered all over the place. Its a solid look at the man's life indeed.
½ February 20, 2013
Bringing a Sage to Life
While I have always been critical of historical films I have still enjoyed them and supported many, as they are sometimes the door for a person to become familiar with an aspect of history. This might, I dare suggest, lead to reading a book. Taking on the figure of Kongzi in a biographical movie is a risk to either provide something real and accessible to viewers, or to produce a misleading bit of fantastical myth. Indeed, there was and still is much debate over this interpretation of the Master Sage. I was please to find this production firmly planted on solid reason, with only a little embellishments.
The film focuses on what are the major events of Kongzi's life minus much of the myth surrounding him. It ignores his birth, which in some texts is straight out of Greek myth, and skips right to the well know period when he was an advisor for Duke Ding of Lu. It stays with this period of his life throughout beginning of the film, showing his successes as an advisor and how it made him enemies with the powerful family clans that mostly ran the state. The film continues after Kongzi is exiled from Lu and travels the Middle Kingdom looking for employment with his band of followers. It shows some famous meetings Kongzi had with those in power and how destitute he and his followers become traveling the countryside, as well as some of the appointments to government posts his followers win for themselves. Eventually, the film brings the story full circle only after Kongzi learns to be content with teaching and writing the now famous Annuls.
How this film appears is quite stunning. The costumes are very well done and showing a high degree of accuracy, as well as the sets. The viewer is given a good sense of how advanced ancient China really was by the technology and the decorations shown. The importance of this is to show that Kongzi was not speaking to a world filled with people incapable of understanding him, but an educated and develop people that could weight his words and their value.
There are many great actors in this film, especially among those that played Kongzi's followers. Ren Quan as Yan Hui is worthy of note, playing out the young man's steadfast loyalty to the Master he follows. He seems to suffer more at his Master's setbacks than Kongzi myself. Many of the actors play out emotional scenes of loss and suffering very well, tears welling up and wails of despair in the best classical Chinese cinematic tradition. However great the others are the film had to rest on one actor, and that was whoever played Kongzi. The tall frame of Chow Yun-fat held up well carrying the weight of Chinese history. He portrayed a well balanced blend of humility and knowledge throughout the movie. That might be the only real compliant, as the arrogance that a younger Kongzi was said to possess is not shown here.
There were many doubters when his Chow was announced to play Kongzi. People felt that the native Cantonese speaker would distort the Mandarin in which he would have to speak, thus making Kongzi sound less intelligent. Not being fleunt in either of these languages I can not comment on that myself. Chow has always had presence, it is one of the things I enjoy most about his movies. I have never felt that he was an actor to play any role, but an actor to play the right roles, ones that commanded such a presence. How Chow physically plays Kongzi was one of the brighter parts of the film. His body language at the beginning of the film shows perfectly a man who is aware of his greatness trying to appeal to his lessors through humility. This changes as Kongzi matures his philosophy and himself.
There were other concerns brought up by critics concerning Chow, tied to his action movie past. In the film there are a few action sequences. This shouldn't surprise anyone familiar with Chinese history. The times in which Kongzi lived were violent and politically chaotic. Wars, small skirmishes, displays of force, rebellions and outright conquering were all very common. Kongzi got involved in a few of these types of events as an advisor to Duke Ding, so of course this was shown in the movie. Many felt that this was lowering the imagine and story of the Sage to that of a action flick brawler. To be honest, I disagree. In the film Kongzi rarely takes direct action in the fighting, he is giving commands or in some other way witnessing the violence, not swinging his sword around. He displays talent at archery but that was something recorded in history that was attributed to him, as was his zither playing. In all I believe the critics are taking a movie too seriously. While this movie is not a history lesson it is a good place for beginners of ancient Chinese history to get an entertaining introduction to what Kongzi's life may have looked like. After this I would recommend academic level books.
February 2, 2013
OK movie overall and interesting history about China and Confucius but, not terribly exciting
September 27, 2012
Confucius was a statesman and philosopher during the Qin dynasty who championed education and fair government in favour of constant war between the ruling nobility and is one of the most revered figures in Chinese history. The idea of a big budget epic based upon the life of such an interesting figure played by Chow Yun Fat really appealed to me but unfortunately the script writer fell foul of a serious case of Braveheartitus and delivers a sloppy, unfocussed tale that holds its protagonist in such reverence as to render him completely two dimensional. Confucius is presented as a kind of cross between Gandhi and Robin Hood who speaks in one line fortune cookie aphorisms and every plot development is signposted with clumsy exposition, underlined with ham fisted dialogue and double underlined by the overbearingly schmaltzy soundtrack. But at least during the first half as he attempts to civilise his birthplace of Lu there is some narrative momentum; the second is just a series of context-free meanderings that's plagued by so much saccharine it would make Augustus Gloop balk. Basically this film is guilty of the same flaws of its Hollywood counterparts; too much concentration on visual set pieces and sentimentality at the expense of drama and characterisation making Confucius a great disappointment and a wasted opportunity.
garyX
Super Reviewer
September 27, 2012
Confucius was a statesman and philosopher during the Qin dynasty who championed education and fair government in favour of constant war between the ruling nobility and is one of the most revered figures in Chinese history. The idea of a big budget epic based upon the life of such an interesting figure played by Chow Yun Fat really appealed to me but unfortunately the script writer fell foul of a serious case of Braveheartitus and delivers a sloppy, unfocussed tale that holds its protagonist in such reverence as to render him completely two dimensional. Confucius is presented as a kind of cross between Gandhi and Robin Hood who speaks in one line fortune cookie aphorisms and every plot development is signposted with clumsy exposition, underlined with ham fisted dialogue and double underlined by the overbearingly schmaltzy soundtrack. But at least during the first half as he attempts to civilise his birthplace of Lu there is some narrative momentum; the second is just a series of context-free meanderings that's plagued by so much saccharine it would make Augustus Gloop balk. Basically this film is guilty of the same flaws of its Hollywood counterparts; too much concentration on visual set pieces and sentimentality at the expense of drama and characterisation making Confucius a great disappointment and a wasted opportunity.
August 7, 2012
I enjoyed the film. Slow moving and inspiring. What were people expecting, Kung Fu? It's Confucius!
July 1, 2012
2: Interesting historical epic, but not very imaginative or terribly cinematic. The creators probably hewed a bit too close to historical accuracy and temporal continuity. Instead of making the story cinematic it is fairly dogmatic. Still, quite interesting even if it is a bit shallow.
March 29, 2012
Grande chance perdida de fazer um filme grandioso sobre uma figura large than life!
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