Crimson Gold - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Crimson Gold Reviews

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July 27, 2014
This and Battle in Heaven: two enormously dark comedies about working men desperate with social inequality. If Battle in Heaven is overstuffed with artism, Crimson Gold, the less fanciful film, is more grounded in reality, which makes its critique more validly portent.
February 17, 2014
This collaboration between Kiarostami and Panahi two of Iran's best film makers is surely one the best portrays of social inequity and what results from it.
December 31, 2013
Written by Abbas Kiarostami and Directed by Jafar Panehi.A Good combination without FAIL...!
Super Reviewer
June 25, 2013
Kiarostami is not behind the camera here but Jafar Panahi who was the recent subject of This is Not a Film delivers well here. I appreciate this more for the little tidbits that Panahi provides during This is Not a Film with its unexpected directors' commentary. It's raw and real.
½ February 26, 2013
Brutal!!! Un retrato de la sociedad iraní abordado magistralmente de la mano de Jafar Panahi y desde la visión existencialista de Hussein (Hossain Emadeddin), un repartidor de pizzas en la noche y ladrón en las mañanas. Y así comienza la película, por el final, con el robo de una joyería a cargo de Hussein y su cuñado. Retroceso, luego, la historía nos empieza a mostrar cómo y por qué, estos 'ladrones' llegaron ahí y decidieron meterse a robar a esa joyería especialmente. Una refinada lección de moral y principios después de conocer los hechos relevantes. Realizada en su mayoría con actores naturales, este filme es una verdadera lección de puesta en escena y dirección de actores. Recomendada.
**Libertad a Panahi!!**
August 17, 2012
Intriguing character exploration!
½ August 17, 2012
Kiarostami writes and Panahi directs: Dream Team.
Every second of the movie is so worth full, stunning................
July 28, 2012
Panahi's film is another humane entry in his body of work. The first shot captures the entire theme of the film with its frame within a frame, the camera's refusal to turn left or right, the helpless onlookers, and the disintegrating lower class robber. Each of the elements combine to highlight what the rest of the film lays out so beautifully: the inherent inequality (in power and in economics) that pulsates through Iranian society.
July 11, 2012
Talaye Sorkh benefits from a nice central performance from Hossain Emadeddin, who carries the film well, and keeps the interest during the rather slower sections of the film.

The political areas are covered ok, but the twist, which actually opens the film, throws the film off balance, and when the film try?s to run with that central scene and build around the reasons for it, and a political Israel story which although very realistic, does'nt quite all string together.
½ June 6, 2012
Slow-moving, quiet psychological drama about class realities in contemporary Iran.
Super Reviewer
½ April 12, 2012
A real measured and poetic presentation of class and pride in Iranian society and in just human existence in itself.
The film is about a pizza delivery man who attempts to rob a jewellery store. Abbas Kiarostami wrote the script for this film, supposedly after meeting with Quintin Tarantino and you can tell in its non-linear narrative. The film starts with the robbery and him killing himself, then the rest of the film is the build up. This non-linear narrative with the neo-realist style of Iranian new wave does create something void of tension but full of exploration.
January 8, 2012
What seems irrational and insane at the beginning seems so logical at the end of the film.
I loved this film. I especially like how the film is subtle. We are shown squalor, sexism, intolerance but we are never lectured.
We're shown a poor man's mundane repetitive existence, but it is never cliched.
What you see is a man trudging through his life, expressionless, both frustrating and fascinating the viewer. You can never tell what he's thinking. But that's the strength of this movie. You observe Hussein, much like he seems to be observing his own life and you see the subtle contrasts between his poverty and the life of luxury that seems so unattainable.
In the ending scene he finally gets animated. He curses and spits in his own restrained way. After following him on his journey, you completely understand why.
It was great that the director got an actual pizza deliveryman to play a pizza deliveryman. Like the hero in Bicycle Thieves, the non-professional added so much to the character that cannot be seen so much as felt.
½ October 12, 2011
watch it..
not very fond with the slow tempo story line..
June 6, 2011
I found this film difficult to understand, but I loved it. The style is unique. Emadeddin reminds me of Bill Murray in Broken Flowers. I loved the sequence in the expensive apartment. It makes me want to order pizza delivery!
½ May 5, 2011
I'm not the first one to label this as an Iranian "Taxi Driver" and I doubt I'll be the last. The injustices on display are sobering and, perhaps most frustratingly, the charity that I've come to expect from Iranian films doesn't save the day here. Beautifully written and tastefully filmed, this is one sobering flick.
April 2, 2011
Harrowing. Hussein is like an Iranian Travis Bickle, riding his pizza delivery bike all over the city, witnessing the deep chasm of social divide between rich and poor, and ever aware of just which side of that chasm he stands on. Panahi eschews the documentarylike style of The Mirror and Offside is laid aside for a more shadowy, more deliberate look, one that feels as hemmed in and determined as in the very best noir.
Super Reviewer
½ March 20, 2011
slow paced but ultimately satisfying
½ February 13, 2011
Iransk film om det store skel mellem rig og fattig, og udsigten til aldrig at avancere økonomisk. Er dog en smule langtrukken
June 23, 2010
Talaye Sorkh benefits from a nice central performance from Hossain Emadeddin, who carries the film well, and keeps the interest during the rather slower sections of the film.

The political areas are covered ok, but the twist, which actually opens the film, throws the film off balance, and when the film try?s to run with that central scene and build around the reasons for it, and a political Israel story which although very realistic, does'nt quite all string together.
February 8, 2010
A day in the life of a pizza delivery driver in Tehran which gives us (and him) a glimpse of the serious social inequity in the culture. Despite his blank passivity, these class differences affect him deeply. The movie drifts humidly from situation to situation becoming increasingly surreal (at least in the way it must feel to the protagonist). And then we are back at the moment that started the film, only slightly more capable of understanding it.
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