D-Day: The Sixth of June Reviews

  • Dec 05, 2016

    D-Day the Sixth of June (1956) C-106m. ??? D: Henry Koster. Robert Taylor, Richard Todd, Dana Wynter, Edmond O'Brien, John Williams, Jerry Paris. Not quite THE LONGEST DAY but still compact military actioner of WW2's Normandy invasion with American officer Taylor and British leader Todd, their professional and personal problems. Several powerful action scenes.

    D-Day the Sixth of June (1956) C-106m. ??? D: Henry Koster. Robert Taylor, Richard Todd, Dana Wynter, Edmond O'Brien, John Williams, Jerry Paris. Not quite THE LONGEST DAY but still compact military actioner of WW2's Normandy invasion with American officer Taylor and British leader Todd, their professional and personal problems. Several powerful action scenes.

  • May 09, 2016

    The romances seemed completely unnecessary, and took away from an otherwise well-made war film, though had I been around at the time, I would have done my best to woo Dana Wynter myself. Being a huge Edmond O'Brien fan, this got extra marks from me. Worth a watch if you like films from this era, or war films in general...and a purchase and rewatches, if you are fans of any of the stars or of director Koster.

    The romances seemed completely unnecessary, and took away from an otherwise well-made war film, though had I been around at the time, I would have done my best to woo Dana Wynter myself. Being a huge Edmond O'Brien fan, this got extra marks from me. Worth a watch if you like films from this era, or war films in general...and a purchase and rewatches, if you are fans of any of the stars or of director Koster.

  • Apr 17, 2014

    The romances seemed completely unnecessary, and took away from an otherwise well-made war film, though had I been around at the time, I would have done my best to woo Dana Wynter myself. Being a huge Edmond O'Brien fan, this got extra marks from me. Worth a watch if you like films from this era, or war films in general...and a purchase and rewatches, if you are fans of any of the stars or of director Koster.

    The romances seemed completely unnecessary, and took away from an otherwise well-made war film, though had I been around at the time, I would have done my best to woo Dana Wynter myself. Being a huge Edmond O'Brien fan, this got extra marks from me. Worth a watch if you like films from this era, or war films in general...and a purchase and rewatches, if you are fans of any of the stars or of director Koster.

  • Jun 19, 2012

    Tuesday, June 19, 2012 (1956) D-Day: The Sixth Of June ROMANCE/ WAR "D-Day" as the title indicates doesn't serve nothing but a backdrop for the fictious romance between 1 American sergent (Robert Taylor), 1 English woman (Dana Wyte) and 1 British sergent (Edmond O'Brien)- for almost a whole hour and a half are three people blah, blah, blahing, leaving with only 7 minutes of actual combat- yes folks I actually timed it( with the war focusing on the two sergeant's, of course). What makes this film worst is the fact that it's all made up-not even based on actual people, which would at least would've made the story much more interesting. I swear I can be more entertained from listening to actual veterans on "PBS" or the "History channel", for that matter. There is some great acting but my expectations should be met at least by looking at the movie's title which in my mind it's like false advertising, from my perspective anyway. 1 out of 4

    Tuesday, June 19, 2012 (1956) D-Day: The Sixth Of June ROMANCE/ WAR "D-Day" as the title indicates doesn't serve nothing but a backdrop for the fictious romance between 1 American sergent (Robert Taylor), 1 English woman (Dana Wyte) and 1 British sergent (Edmond O'Brien)- for almost a whole hour and a half are three people blah, blah, blahing, leaving with only 7 minutes of actual combat- yes folks I actually timed it( with the war focusing on the two sergeant's, of course). What makes this film worst is the fact that it's all made up-not even based on actual people, which would at least would've made the story much more interesting. I swear I can be more entertained from listening to actual veterans on "PBS" or the "History channel", for that matter. There is some great acting but my expectations should be met at least by looking at the movie's title which in my mind it's like false advertising, from my perspective anyway. 1 out of 4

  • jay n Super Reviewer
    Feb 17, 2011

    Cardboard melodramatics form the backdrop for this war flick that only loosely focuses on the name event. Dana Wynter is fine as is Jerry Paris in a small role, Todd is more an afterthought than a character. Taylor is stiff as usual and O'Brien consumes the scenery and plows over any actor in his way. Forgettable.

    Cardboard melodramatics form the backdrop for this war flick that only loosely focuses on the name event. Dana Wynter is fine as is Jerry Paris in a small role, Todd is more an afterthought than a character. Taylor is stiff as usual and O'Brien consumes the scenery and plows over any actor in his way. Forgettable.

  • Jan 11, 2011

    The Sixth of June was a day on which the world pivoted. This film is an atypical view on the operation that changed the 20th century history. However, this film does not even involve June 6th for the majority of the film. It seems like this film would be better as an American living in London or a World War II love story. Robert Taylor's performance is solid but features some cheesy moments with Dana Wynter. Taylor is not a well known actor but manages a decent performance. Dana Wynter's performance is also decent aside for some corny moments. Richard Todd gives a stiff performance in a role that is strangely similar to the one that he will play in 'The Longest Day'. The director Henry Koster, winner of Best Director for the Bishop's wife, focuses strongly on the relationship between Brad and Val. The narrations that occur before the flashbacks are laugh-out-loud funny even though they are not intended to be. How John meets his demise is quite strange and seems unrealistic (maybe it did happen to people). The ending between the two lovers, Brad and Val, leaves the viewer wanting more.

    The Sixth of June was a day on which the world pivoted. This film is an atypical view on the operation that changed the 20th century history. However, this film does not even involve June 6th for the majority of the film. It seems like this film would be better as an American living in London or a World War II love story. Robert Taylor's performance is solid but features some cheesy moments with Dana Wynter. Taylor is not a well known actor but manages a decent performance. Dana Wynter's performance is also decent aside for some corny moments. Richard Todd gives a stiff performance in a role that is strangely similar to the one that he will play in 'The Longest Day'. The director Henry Koster, winner of Best Director for the Bishop's wife, focuses strongly on the relationship between Brad and Val. The narrations that occur before the flashbacks are laugh-out-loud funny even though they are not intended to be. How John meets his demise is quite strange and seems unrealistic (maybe it did happen to people). The ending between the two lovers, Brad and Val, leaves the viewer wanting more.

  • Apr 19, 2010

    based on the title alone I had not realised that this was actually a romance film and that the D-Day landing would actually only take up 5 mintues of the film

    based on the title alone I had not realised that this was actually a romance film and that the D-Day landing would actually only take up 5 mintues of the film

  • Mar 21, 2010

    Not so much a war film as a wartime romantic melodrama which for me was only watchable for the most beautiful actress ever - Dana Wynter!

    Not so much a war film as a wartime romantic melodrama which for me was only watchable for the most beautiful actress ever - Dana Wynter!

  • Jan 28, 2010

    Although the title promises epic large-scale combat heroism, the Twentieth Century Fox release D-DAY: THE SIXTH OF JUNE, with Robert Taylor, Richard Todd, and Edmond O’Brien, delivers more soap opera bubbles than battlefield bravado. This traditional World War II battlefront melodrama accords its superior officers with respect and honor. Indeed, D-DAY focuses ostensibly on officers above the rank of lieutenant; no enlisted men appear in prominent roles. Cigar-chomping sergeants do not flesh out of the cast. Unfortunately, HARVEY director Henry Koster and scenarists Ivan Moffett of BHOWANI JUNCTION and Harry Brown of EIGHT IRON MEN have tampered so much with the formula that this war picture ranks poorly in comparison to the star-studded 1963 Twentieth Century Fox release THE LONGEST DAY with John Wayne, Robert Mitchum, and Henry Fonda. The locales are suitably convincing, and the narrative shows the tension that occurred as a result of Americans intruding on Englishmen. The clashes between the English and the Americans amount to a minor theme that peters out quickly. D-DAY: THE SIXTH OF JUNE suffers from a multitude of flaws. First, our rugged heroes do not embark on top-secret mission until the last twenty minutes of the action. True, the film opens with a briefing and the troops piling aboard the transports, but the action shifts from the now back to the past. Koster and company devote the bulk of the action to the flashbacks about two romances between Taylor and Todd with Dana Wynter. Lieutenant Colonel John Wynter served under British Brigadier General Russell (John Williams of DIAL M FOR MURDER) who received a wound at Dunkirk that put him out of action. Second, unaccountably Wynter decides to cheat on her valiant boyfriend, British Lieutenant Colonel John Wynter (Richard Todd of THE LONGEST DAY) who has gone to North Africa. She cheats on him with newly arrived U.S. Army Captain Brad Parker (Robert Taylor of THE LAW AND JAKE WADE) who has come to England to serve as a staff officer for Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Timmer (Edmond O’Brien of WHITE HEAT). Parker broke his leg while he was in the parachutes so he has been put in a desk job, but he yearns for action. When General Russell attacks a U.S. Army Air Force sergeant, Parker and a colleague have to investigate and try to smooth the general’s ruffled feathers. During their meeting with the general, Parker meets Red Cross volunteer Valerie Russell (Dana Wynter of INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS) and they strike up a relationship. Parker cheats with Russell on his wife back home in the states. Third, the filmmakers relegate Edmond O’Brien to the thankless role of an ambitious Army officer who cracks up under pressure before the big mission. He has a nasty habit of sharing classified military information with civilians. Fourth, the actual mission does not last long, no more than a quarter of an hour. The heroes land at Normandy, encounter enough opposition for both heroes to wind up wounded, and then silence a huge artillery piece gun emplacement. Fifth, one of the heroes dies an ignominious death. A demolition team defusing bombs on the beaches warns the officer about roaming around on a beach still sown with live land mines. The officer ignores the mind disposal experts, trips a mind and blows himself to smithereens. Sixth, the romance is a complete bust and everybody seems to be punished for either their infidelity or their idiocy. Moreover, Lieutenant Colonel Wynter shows no ill feelings toward Parker. Indeed, he knows about him because Valerie told him about Parker. These two guys never tangle. Parker respects Wynter when the high command selects him to replace Lieutenant Colonel Timmer after his breakdown. Seventh, another supporting character commits suicide. Mind you, the battle scenes are fairly bloodless and the filmmakers depict the German Army as an impersonal enemy. The biggest pet peeve that this movie shares in common with too many World War II movies is the way the officers display their rank. Typically, a ranking officer did not plunge into combat with his rank on the front of his helmet or on his lapels for fear that a sniper might kill or wound him. In the big battle scene, the Robert Taylor character sports his rank on the front of his enemy. Altogether, skip D-DAY: THE SIXTH OF JUNE and watch THE LONGEST DAY. A more appropriate title could have been PRELUDE TO D-DAY. Think about it, why made a movie about an important military date in the twentieth century and then show what happened during that event.

    Although the title promises epic large-scale combat heroism, the Twentieth Century Fox release D-DAY: THE SIXTH OF JUNE, with Robert Taylor, Richard Todd, and Edmond O’Brien, delivers more soap opera bubbles than battlefield bravado. This traditional World War II battlefront melodrama accords its superior officers with respect and honor. Indeed, D-DAY focuses ostensibly on officers above the rank of lieutenant; no enlisted men appear in prominent roles. Cigar-chomping sergeants do not flesh out of the cast. Unfortunately, HARVEY director Henry Koster and scenarists Ivan Moffett of BHOWANI JUNCTION and Harry Brown of EIGHT IRON MEN have tampered so much with the formula that this war picture ranks poorly in comparison to the star-studded 1963 Twentieth Century Fox release THE LONGEST DAY with John Wayne, Robert Mitchum, and Henry Fonda. The locales are suitably convincing, and the narrative shows the tension that occurred as a result of Americans intruding on Englishmen. The clashes between the English and the Americans amount to a minor theme that peters out quickly. D-DAY: THE SIXTH OF JUNE suffers from a multitude of flaws. First, our rugged heroes do not embark on top-secret mission until the last twenty minutes of the action. True, the film opens with a briefing and the troops piling aboard the transports, but the action shifts from the now back to the past. Koster and company devote the bulk of the action to the flashbacks about two romances between Taylor and Todd with Dana Wynter. Lieutenant Colonel John Wynter served under British Brigadier General Russell (John Williams of DIAL M FOR MURDER) who received a wound at Dunkirk that put him out of action. Second, unaccountably Wynter decides to cheat on her valiant boyfriend, British Lieutenant Colonel John Wynter (Richard Todd of THE LONGEST DAY) who has gone to North Africa. She cheats on him with newly arrived U.S. Army Captain Brad Parker (Robert Taylor of THE LAW AND JAKE WADE) who has come to England to serve as a staff officer for Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Timmer (Edmond O’Brien of WHITE HEAT). Parker broke his leg while he was in the parachutes so he has been put in a desk job, but he yearns for action. When General Russell attacks a U.S. Army Air Force sergeant, Parker and a colleague have to investigate and try to smooth the general’s ruffled feathers. During their meeting with the general, Parker meets Red Cross volunteer Valerie Russell (Dana Wynter of INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS) and they strike up a relationship. Parker cheats with Russell on his wife back home in the states. Third, the filmmakers relegate Edmond O’Brien to the thankless role of an ambitious Army officer who cracks up under pressure before the big mission. He has a nasty habit of sharing classified military information with civilians. Fourth, the actual mission does not last long, no more than a quarter of an hour. The heroes land at Normandy, encounter enough opposition for both heroes to wind up wounded, and then silence a huge artillery piece gun emplacement. Fifth, one of the heroes dies an ignominious death. A demolition team defusing bombs on the beaches warns the officer about roaming around on a beach still sown with live land mines. The officer ignores the mind disposal experts, trips a mind and blows himself to smithereens. Sixth, the romance is a complete bust and everybody seems to be punished for either their infidelity or their idiocy. Moreover, Lieutenant Colonel Wynter shows no ill feelings toward Parker. Indeed, he knows about him because Valerie told him about Parker. These two guys never tangle. Parker respects Wynter when the high command selects him to replace Lieutenant Colonel Timmer after his breakdown. Seventh, another supporting character commits suicide. Mind you, the battle scenes are fairly bloodless and the filmmakers depict the German Army as an impersonal enemy. The biggest pet peeve that this movie shares in common with too many World War II movies is the way the officers display their rank. Typically, a ranking officer did not plunge into combat with his rank on the front of his helmet or on his lapels for fear that a sniper might kill or wound him. In the big battle scene, the Robert Taylor character sports his rank on the front of his enemy. Altogether, skip D-DAY: THE SIXTH OF JUNE and watch THE LONGEST DAY. A more appropriate title could have been PRELUDE TO D-DAY. Think about it, why made a movie about an important military date in the twentieth century and then show what happened during that event.

  • Bruce B Super Reviewer
    Oct 04, 2009

    This is not the typical War story like most that came out after the BIG ONE WWII. Very little war scenes or fighting in this one. My guess it was made for women who were getting tired of going to see bang bang shoot'em up movies. Its more of a romance story. Robert Taylor who is married falls in love with a women while in station in England, Her fiancée is fighting the war in Africa. So he's a player and so is she. I am sure this upset a few households in America when it came out. In the end Robert is sent to be involved in the landing of D-Day where our ladies fiancée saves Robert Taylor and puts him on a wounded solders ship and sends him back to England, he then turns around and is blown to bits by a land mine. Still its a good classic film. Worth 3 1/2 Stars.

    This is not the typical War story like most that came out after the BIG ONE WWII. Very little war scenes or fighting in this one. My guess it was made for women who were getting tired of going to see bang bang shoot'em up movies. Its more of a romance story. Robert Taylor who is married falls in love with a women while in station in England, Her fiancée is fighting the war in Africa. So he's a player and so is she. I am sure this upset a few households in America when it came out. In the end Robert is sent to be involved in the landing of D-Day where our ladies fiancée saves Robert Taylor and puts him on a wounded solders ship and sends him back to England, he then turns around and is blown to bits by a land mine. Still its a good classic film. Worth 3 1/2 Stars.