Passing Fancy Reviews

  • Feb 22, 2013

    Another of Ozu's wonderful films about family life in Japan.

    Another of Ozu's wonderful films about family life in Japan.

  • Dec 28, 2012

    an odd but welcome departure for director Ozu.

    an odd but welcome departure for director Ozu.

  • Aug 17, 2012

    A bit derivative of "I Was Born, But," however I feel that will turn more into Ozu's style that I will get used to. More drama than comedy this time around but still very engaging.

    A bit derivative of "I Was Born, But," however I feel that will turn more into Ozu's style that I will get used to. More drama than comedy this time around but still very engaging.

  • Jul 30, 2012

    The characters are so vivid, you never even notice it's a silent movie

    The characters are so vivid, you never even notice it's a silent movie

  • Feb 23, 2012

    A nice little comedy film about a dumb daddy who falls in love with a girl passing through town, and another man who is also falls in love with the same woman. Not your typical Ozu family movie, as it has a bumbling idiot for the main character, immediately not a person to sympathize or empathize with. Interestingly, you think, "How dumb is this dad?" while watching everything he does. But just like Homer Simpson, you can't stop watching it. Yup, there is a connection between Homer and Ozu...

    A nice little comedy film about a dumb daddy who falls in love with a girl passing through town, and another man who is also falls in love with the same woman. Not your typical Ozu family movie, as it has a bumbling idiot for the main character, immediately not a person to sympathize or empathize with. Interestingly, you think, "How dumb is this dad?" while watching everything he does. But just like Homer Simpson, you can't stop watching it. Yup, there is a connection between Homer and Ozu...

  • Mar 24, 2011

    One month old scotch.

    One month old scotch.

  • Stella D Super Reviewer
    Jan 23, 2011

    another completely charming comedy/drama character study of japanese family life, this one concerning a single father and his son. the film is anchored by a marvelous performance by takeshi sakamoto who went on to star in a series of ozu's films. his character is a bit of a layabout and a drunkard whose young son is often frustrated with him. the boy is one of the brat brothers from i was born, but... one remarkable thing about ozu's silents is how few intertitle cards are required to tell the story. also the vince guaraldi style piano scores to these films are delightful. i'm sure they were added by criterion

    another completely charming comedy/drama character study of japanese family life, this one concerning a single father and his son. the film is anchored by a marvelous performance by takeshi sakamoto who went on to star in a series of ozu's films. his character is a bit of a layabout and a drunkard whose young son is often frustrated with him. the boy is one of the brat brothers from i was born, but... one remarkable thing about ozu's silents is how few intertitle cards are required to tell the story. also the vince guaraldi style piano scores to these films are delightful. i'm sure they were added by criterion

  • Sep 23, 2009

    Slight but enjoyable tale of an uneducated widower trying to care for his young son. The story rambles a bit, but most of the episodes have something to offer. Ozu's real talent is creating instantly relatable characters, and seeing their innate kindness beneath their flaws. I can't think of an Ozu movie that has a true "villain", although I guess you could make the argument for Tokyo Story.

    Slight but enjoyable tale of an uneducated widower trying to care for his young son. The story rambles a bit, but most of the episodes have something to offer. Ozu's real talent is creating instantly relatable characters, and seeing their innate kindness beneath their flaws. I can't think of an Ozu movie that has a true "villain", although I guess you could make the argument for Tokyo Story.

  • Walter M Super Reviewer
    Apr 10, 2009

    [font=Century Gothic]Directed by Yasujiro Ozu, "Passing Fancy" is a winning and charming movie about friendship, family and loyalty. Kihachi(Takeshi Sakamato) is a single father of Tomio(Tomio Aoki) and has pretty much given up on romance. That changes with a chance meeting with Harue(Nobuko Fushimi) who just lost her job and is without a place to sleep for the night. Kihachi arranges lodging for her which leads to employment at the local inn. He becomes smitten with her even though he is quite a bit older. However, she only has eyes for Jiro(Den Obinata), Kihachi's best friend and coworker at a brewery, putting their friendship in jeopardy.[/font]

    [font=Century Gothic]Directed by Yasujiro Ozu, "Passing Fancy" is a winning and charming movie about friendship, family and loyalty. Kihachi(Takeshi Sakamato) is a single father of Tomio(Tomio Aoki) and has pretty much given up on romance. That changes with a chance meeting with Harue(Nobuko Fushimi) who just lost her job and is without a place to sleep for the night. Kihachi arranges lodging for her which leads to employment at the local inn. He becomes smitten with her even though he is quite a bit older. However, she only has eyes for Jiro(Den Obinata), Kihachi's best friend and coworker at a brewery, putting their friendship in jeopardy.[/font]

  • Nov 09, 2008

    Ozu certainly does not need lessons from anyone in how to make a film that blends heartfelt comedy with weighty family drama. This is the only picture I can think of that focuses on a single parent family, but over the course of the film one starts to realize, as does Kihachi, that he really isn't alone in raising his son. This film has the characteristic grace and style of the other Ozu silent films I've seen, which matches up nicely with his later pictures as well. I don't think he had a bad film in him, especially not when he is this honest with himself and audience. There aren't any directors quite like him and very few that that deserve comparison.

    Ozu certainly does not need lessons from anyone in how to make a film that blends heartfelt comedy with weighty family drama. This is the only picture I can think of that focuses on a single parent family, but over the course of the film one starts to realize, as does Kihachi, that he really isn't alone in raising his son. This film has the characteristic grace and style of the other Ozu silent films I've seen, which matches up nicely with his later pictures as well. I don't think he had a bad film in him, especially not when he is this honest with himself and audience. There aren't any directors quite like him and very few that that deserve comparison.