Demented Death Farm Massacre Reviews

  • Jan 05, 2014

    It is not everyday you get to see a dainty british man chase two red necks around in the woods of the deep south.

    It is not everyday you get to see a dainty british man chase two red necks around in the woods of the deep south.

  • Jan 05, 2014

    This is in the Toxie's Triple Terror Volume 1 pack. This movie is hilarious! Not sure why this is so poorly rated, but I enjoyed it!

    This is in the Toxie's Triple Terror Volume 1 pack. This movie is hilarious! Not sure why this is so poorly rated, but I enjoyed it!

  • Jan 26, 2011

    As lackluster as this movie is, I do have to toast John Carradine, who plays an incidental part in "Demented Death Farm Massacre" (its second title, after the original "Honey Britches," among about a half-dozen others). Carradine can make at least scenes he appears in watchable, even when the films surrounding them are garbage; yes, I've seen "The Unearthly," "Red Zone Cuba," and "The Incredible Petrified World." Carradine is like a longer-lived Bela Lugosi, with the former's Ed Wood period lasting three decades longer and shifting hands among multiple cut-rate directors. Both men were excellent actors often confined to giving memorable, above-average performances in films and alongside fellow thespians unfit to lick their boots. In "Massacre," Carradine plays the Judge of Hell, a ghostly figure completely separated from the action by both setting and the fact that his footage was shot by producer/co-director Fred Olen Ray, who bought the rights to the little-seen "Honey Britches" years after its release, added unrelated scenes with Carradine, coined the name "Demented Death Farm Massacre," and released it through Troma. The main story concerns a quartet of inept but tough-talking jewel thieves who, while on the lamb in the backwoods South, decide to hide out with religious zealot moonshine merchant Harlan (George Ellis) and his naive wife Reba Sue (Ashley Brooks). Unfortunately, the gang takes not only advantage of the hillbillies' hospitality but for fools as well, attempting to intrude on Harlan's bootlegging and his wife as well. Morality tales are certainly weird to associate with Troma and backwoods intrigue, but the movie does somewhat advance an agenda, taking a kinder view of the hardworking (if dissolute) Harlan than the duplicitous, opportunistic, callous hoodlums who terrorize him and his wife. However, Troma was also a studio that never met a critique of sanctimony it didn't like; it's no small wonder Lloyd Kaufman and company agreed to release Ray's rejiggered version of "Honey Britches," with its knife-twist of an ending.

    As lackluster as this movie is, I do have to toast John Carradine, who plays an incidental part in "Demented Death Farm Massacre" (its second title, after the original "Honey Britches," among about a half-dozen others). Carradine can make at least scenes he appears in watchable, even when the films surrounding them are garbage; yes, I've seen "The Unearthly," "Red Zone Cuba," and "The Incredible Petrified World." Carradine is like a longer-lived Bela Lugosi, with the former's Ed Wood period lasting three decades longer and shifting hands among multiple cut-rate directors. Both men were excellent actors often confined to giving memorable, above-average performances in films and alongside fellow thespians unfit to lick their boots. In "Massacre," Carradine plays the Judge of Hell, a ghostly figure completely separated from the action by both setting and the fact that his footage was shot by producer/co-director Fred Olen Ray, who bought the rights to the little-seen "Honey Britches" years after its release, added unrelated scenes with Carradine, coined the name "Demented Death Farm Massacre," and released it through Troma. The main story concerns a quartet of inept but tough-talking jewel thieves who, while on the lamb in the backwoods South, decide to hide out with religious zealot moonshine merchant Harlan (George Ellis) and his naive wife Reba Sue (Ashley Brooks). Unfortunately, the gang takes not only advantage of the hillbillies' hospitality but for fools as well, attempting to intrude on Harlan's bootlegging and his wife as well. Morality tales are certainly weird to associate with Troma and backwoods intrigue, but the movie does somewhat advance an agenda, taking a kinder view of the hardworking (if dissolute) Harlan than the duplicitous, opportunistic, callous hoodlums who terrorize him and his wife. However, Troma was also a studio that never met a critique of sanctimony it didn't like; it's no small wonder Lloyd Kaufman and company agreed to release Ray's rejiggered version of "Honey Britches," with its knife-twist of an ending.

  • Aug 24, 2008

    Not much in the way of climax but the ride is campy fun. Silly and dumb as it can be. The back of the box calls it A Fish Called Wanda meets Deliverance. And I guess it is except where Wanda had memorable humor and Deliverance had great suspence, this is pure silly. Don't expect anything.

    Not much in the way of climax but the ride is campy fun. Silly and dumb as it can be. The back of the box calls it A Fish Called Wanda meets Deliverance. And I guess it is except where Wanda had memorable humor and Deliverance had great suspence, this is pure silly. Don't expect anything.

  • Jul 26, 2008

    What can I say about Fred Olen Ray, he can make some really terrible movies even b-movies. As far as a Troma movie goes, it isn't a stand-out at all. Nothing overlly memorable from this one, except, John Carradine is in it and the cover art is pretty cool.

    What can I say about Fred Olen Ray, he can make some really terrible movies even b-movies. As far as a Troma movie goes, it isn't a stand-out at all. Nothing overlly memorable from this one, except, John Carradine is in it and the cover art is pretty cool.