Di yi lei xing wei xian (Don't Play with Fire) (Dangerous Encounters: 1st Kind) Reviews

  • Jul 17, 2012

    Tsui Hark's notorious breakthrough work is a rare beast. Brutal and nihilistic to the core, it also one of the most cynical and anarchic film ever made. While it is far from perfect on a storytelling level, it does showcase Tsui's adventurous sensibilities as a filmmaker, something that he hasn't quite shown in recent times.

    Tsui Hark's notorious breakthrough work is a rare beast. Brutal and nihilistic to the core, it also one of the most cynical and anarchic film ever made. While it is far from perfect on a storytelling level, it does showcase Tsui's adventurous sensibilities as a filmmaker, something that he hasn't quite shown in recent times.

  • Jul 11, 2011

    A masterclass in nihilistic film making, just don't watch it if you like little white mice !

    A masterclass in nihilistic film making, just don't watch it if you like little white mice !

  • Nov 12, 2010

    Dangerous Encounters - 1st Kind (aka Don't Play With Fire) is a nihilistic, angry, violent, firecracker of a film full of enough tension and pathos for a dozen lesser movies. This is Hong Kong cinema, and a premier example of the HK new wave. While HK had a film industry for decades (one of the most prolific and profitable in the world), it wasn't until the late '70s and early '80s that Hongkie filmmakers began to make movies set in HK, about Hongkies. Tsui Hark was at the vanguard of this new wave movement, very similar to the director-period of Hollywood cinema in the early '70s. Hard to find, but worth the effort of tracking down. There really isn't anything else like it. It's a quintessential HK film, made by one of the country's most visionary and important auteurs.

    Dangerous Encounters - 1st Kind (aka Don't Play With Fire) is a nihilistic, angry, violent, firecracker of a film full of enough tension and pathos for a dozen lesser movies. This is Hong Kong cinema, and a premier example of the HK new wave. While HK had a film industry for decades (one of the most prolific and profitable in the world), it wasn't until the late '70s and early '80s that Hongkie filmmakers began to make movies set in HK, about Hongkies. Tsui Hark was at the vanguard of this new wave movement, very similar to the director-period of Hollywood cinema in the early '70s. Hard to find, but worth the effort of tracking down. There really isn't anything else like it. It's a quintessential HK film, made by one of the country's most visionary and important auteurs.