Diary of a Mad Black Woman Reviews

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February 25, 2005
Here is a brand new genre: A black-Christian romantic revenge comedy. It doesn't quite work, but Tyler Perry is a jewel.
February 25, 2005
Perry doesn't have any delusions of artistry, and potentially, at least, that's refreshing. But any points he earns for lack of pretense are immediately gobbled up by his lack of subtlety.
February 25, 2005
A would-be feminist farce that will leave you slackjawed at its incompetence.
February 25, 2005
There's an audience for this schizophrenic movie, without question, but that doesn't make it any better.
February 25, 2005
A crudely made hodgepodge of rank clichs that veers between shrill melodrama, glossy soap opera, and broad, sitcom-level comedy.
February 25, 2005
Perhaps the juxtaposition of slapstick comedy and stark drama somehow works on stage, but it's jarringly off-putting on film.
February 25, 2005
The quality of mercy is a little strained.
February 25, 2005
Raucous and overwrought, the movie is still a hoot to watch and even more fun to talk back to.
February 25, 2005
The material comes off as a serious miscalculation in Perry and director Darren Grant's film adaptation.
February 25, 2005
This peculiar and none-too-felicitous mix of Bible-thumping, heartstring-jerking and man-bashing never finds its tone, careening wildly from slapstick comedy to soapy melodrama.
February 25, 2005
Stay clear of this mess.
February 25, 2005
There's nothing real or even funny in Perry's performance; all padding and crude makeup, he shouts every line as if he's still playing to the upper balcony in a rundown Masonic Hall.
February 25, 2005
Tries to be every single movie ever made all at once, leaving the viewer with the emotional equivalent of whiplash.
February 25, 2005
The low comedy and high melodrama, with a touch of inspiration, don't blend easily, and here the match seems forced.
February 25, 2005
Be forewarned that writer/actor Tyler Perry's cross-dressing turn as same only accounts for a meager portion of this cynical exercise in manipulation.
February 25, 2005
Those who aren't already converts to Perry's dramaturgy will wonder what elevates this material above, say, a typical episode of '227.'
February 25, 2005
It's an unusual mix of vulgarity and piety.
February 25, 2005
Darren Grant, a music vid guy making his feature debut, presents it all in a smooth, elegant package that almost disguises the fact that what we're watching is the narrative equivalent of an eight-ring circus.
February 25, 2005
One is left with the sense that while Perry has captured certain truths about human experience, he undermines himself by ignoring psychological detail in favor of big gestures and simplistic explanations.
February 25, 2005
It turns on a dime from scenes of maudlin sentimentality to manic slapstick, then turns on another dime to trite Christian moralizing.
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