Dinner for Schmucks Reviews

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Leah Rozen
TheWrap
January 24, 2012
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Rene Rodriguez
Miami Herald
January 31, 2011
You know you're in trouble when the best thing in your movie is a bunch of dead rodents.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/4
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Dave Calhoun
Time Out
September 1, 2010
A decent cast wrestle with a crummy script in this loose and creaky Hollywood spin on Le Dîner de Cons...
Full Review | Original Score: 2/5
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Lisa Kennedy
Denver Post
August 2, 2010
The movie has a slew of goofball moments that don't add up to a consistently hilarious outing.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/4
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Liam Lacey
Globe and Mail
July 30, 2010
With moments of fitful hilarity, the pairing of Paul Rudd, Steve Carell and a talented cast of secondary actors, there's plenty here to keep summer comedy fans satiated, if not entirely satisfied.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/4
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Tom Long
Detroit News
July 30, 2010
Pure, tasteless slapstick silliness with little on its mind beyond cheap yuks.
Full Review | Original Score: B
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Ann Hornaday
Washington Post
July 30, 2010
Dinner for Schmucks may be as broad as the proverbial groaning board, but Rudd and Carell bring out its most toothsome delights.
Full Review | Original Score: 2.5/4
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Peter Rainer
Christian Science Monitor
July 30, 2010
Veber's comic conceit, which stopped short of actually showing the dinner, doesn't really cross the Atlantic intact.
Full Review | Original Score: C-
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Lou Lumenick
New York Post
July 30, 2010
Dinner With Schmucks may actually be the funniest movie currently in the marketplace -- but that's pretty much by default.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/4
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Andrew O'Hehir
Salon.com
July 30, 2010
All the disorderly or anarchistic possibilities of its premise get channeled back toward a message of symbolic pseudo-redemption, which is what Hollywood movies have to deliver at all costs.
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Richard Corliss
TIME Magazine
July 30, 2010
This may not be the highest achievement of the director's art -- to exceed minimal expectations -- but it's an honorable one, and Roach makes the grade.
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Peter Howell
Toronto Star
July 30, 2010
In adapting Francis Veber's 1998 French farce Le Dîner des cons (The Dinner Game), Roach and his writers David Guion and Michael Handelman have completely defanged it.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/4
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John Anderson
Wall Street Journal
July 30, 2010
The point of the movie is how miserable Tim's life is made by Barry, and audiences will know exactly how he feels.
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Claudia Puig
USA Today
July 30, 2010
Where the French leads were nasty, Steve Carell and Paul Rudd have an inherently likable quality even when playing a foolish sap and a cutthroat businessman.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
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James Rocchi
MSN Movies
July 30, 2010
...it's hard not to think the portion offered here is just enough to satisfy anyone looking for a few laughs.
Full Review | Original Score: 3.5/5
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Stephen Whitty
Newark Star-Ledger
July 30, 2010
Most of the problem is in the performance of Steve Carell.
Full Review | Original Score: 2.5/4
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Steven Rea
Philadelphia Inquirer
July 30, 2010
Jay Roach has cast his picture with standout comic talents...
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
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Mick LaSalle
San Francisco Chronicle
July 30, 2010
It's funny from the beginning, and it stays funny, even as it beats scenes to death and overstays its welcome.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
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Christopher Kelly
Dallas Morning News
July 30, 2010
It's lurching, desperate and borderline incomprehensible -- a movie whose characters act according to no known precept of recognizable human behavior.
Full Review | Original Score: 1/5
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Kenneth Turan
Los Angeles Times
July 29, 2010
Against all reason and expectation, the result is a distinctly unfunny film.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/5
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Colin Covert
Minneapolis Star Tribune
July 29, 2010
Dinner for Schmucks has everything that money can buy. That does not include comic inspiration, daring or velocity.
| Original Score: 1.5/4
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Ty Burr
Boston Globe
July 29, 2010
A number of bits don't work, some of the characters wear out their welcome, but the whole suckers you into an agreeable state of idiot bliss.
Full Review | Original Score: 2.5/4
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Genevieve Koski
AV Club
July 29, 2010
Dinner For Schmucks is leagues ahead of its forebear in terms of mass appeal, but its laughs are more silly than scathing.
Full Review | Original Score: B-
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Moira MacDonald
Seattle Times
July 29, 2010
Give these two a better script, and you just might have a comedy classic. Instead, we have here a tolerable near-miss; enough to keep the hunger pangs away until a real meal arrives.
Full Review | Original Score: 2.5/4
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A.O. Scott
New York Times
July 29, 2010
In some ways an exemplary modern Hollywood comedy.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/5
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Tom Shone
Slate
July 29, 2010
Roach may be the least organic director of comedy currently working in Hollywood.
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MaryAnn Johanson
Film.com
July 29, 2010
The same overall effect... could be achieved by intercutting Three Stooges shorts with YouTube videos of adorable kittens rolling around with baby bunnies...
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Roger Ebert
Chicago Sun-Times
July 29, 2010
The genius of this version depends on the performance by Steve Carell, who plays Barry Speck as a man impervious to insult and utterly at peace with himself. He's truly a transcendent idiot.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
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Joe Neumaier
New York Daily News
July 29, 2010
Despite its schticky title, the trick to Dinner for Schmucks isn't the schmucks, although director Jay Roach's funny comedy, adapted from a 1998 French film, makes sure every group of oddballs is represented.
Full Review | Original Score: 3.5/5
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Christy Lemire
Associated Press
July 29, 2010
Whereas The Dinner Game from celebrated writer-director Francis Veber was a tight, sharp satire of societal pretension, this remake seems more interested in easy, broad slapstick.
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J. R. Jones
Chicago Reader
July 29, 2010
A perfect example of the modern comedy mill gone wrong, a prolonged muddle whose plot, specific situations, and improvised quips never line up.
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Peter Travers
Rolling Stone
July 29, 2010
When Hollywood decides to remake French farce by Francis Veber, the result can be a champagne cocktail or pâté de merde. Dinner for Schmucks falls somewhere in the middle. What makes the soufflé rise is the actors.
Full Review | Original Score: 2.5/4
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Michael Phillips
Chicago Tribune
July 29, 2010
I think I'll be in the minority on this one, but you know comedy: Nothing's more personal.
Full Review | Original Score: 1.5/4
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Bill Goodykoontz
Arizona Republic
July 28, 2010
Steve Carell is the best comic actor working today.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/5
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James Berardinelli
ReelViews
July 28, 2010
The film is sporadically amusing but gives the impression it should be generating more laughs than it does.
Full Review | Original Score: 2.5/4
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Lisa Schwarzbaum
Entertainment Weekly
July 28, 2010
A bland, summer-sloppy comedy that never risks actually swimming with schmucks and letting characters bruise themselves on outcroppings of mean fun.
Full Review | Original Score: C
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Jennie Yabroff
Newsweek
July 28, 2010
Though the premise of Dinner for Schmucks is deeply cruel, we are supposed to laugh, because we trust that by the closing credits the characters will have matured into upstanding men.
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Roger Moore
Orlando Sentinel
July 28, 2010
Like a four-star desert at the end of a hit-or-miss four-course meal, the finale is worth the wait.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
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Aaron Hillis
Time Out
July 28, 2010
The mismatched buddy shtick with a tender resolution is on autopilot.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/5
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Dan Kois
Village Voice
July 27, 2010
Paramount Pictures and director Jay Roach would like to invite you to a dinner they're hosting, at which you are welcome to laugh at these poor jerks. That's a little messed up.
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Peter Debruge
Variety
July 16, 2010
An uproarious odd-couple remake of Francis Veber's hit French farce The Dinner Game.
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John DeFore
Hollywood Reporter
July 16, 2010
Steve Carell finds a character more clueless than Michael Scott in broad laffer redeemed by occasional quirks.