Django 2: Il Grande Ritorno (Django Strikes Again) Reviews

  • Oct 27, 2016

    Not as bad as you'd expect, not as good as you'd hope. Still pretty fun, though.

    Not as bad as you'd expect, not as good as you'd hope. Still pretty fun, though.

  • Aug 04, 2013

    Django 2: Il Grande Ritorno also known as Django Strikes Again has the benefit of being the only official sequel to Sergio Corbucci's 1966 Spaghetti Western Cult Classic and the star who created the role, Franco Nero. This proves to be the only benefit to Django Strikes Again in the end. Django Strikes Again lives up to the standards not of its predecessor, but of the more than 30 unofficial sequels that accompanied it to capitalise on Django's success. Its obvious why this one did not, because the only slight tribute it plays to its iconic character is giving him back his iconic weapon to use. What else it gives him is a mix of terrible lighting, poor visual quality and utterly extreme boredom stretched over a period of 90 minutes which proves to be painfully long. There is no plot worth following in Django Strikes Again as it is not western enough to be a western or entertaining enough to be entertaining. Its essentially a low-budget civil war drama featuring the iconic character Django and Franco Nero to portray him, yet the amount of screen time he actually gets is too minimal for the film to be called Django Strikes Back, when a significantly more appropriate title would be "Franco Nero Comes Back Once in a While". There just isn't fun in Django Strikes Again, not even being the slightest bit reminiscent of the cheap and derivative fun that came with the original Django as a rip off of A Fistful of Dollars. Director Nello Rossati not only makes Django Strikes Again a technical failure, but fails to capitalise on the fact that he has been presented with the opportunity to make the actual sequel to Django, and so I would never call it that. It is merely another unofficial sequel to Django which features a cameo by Franco Nero and is no better than all the other low-budget unofficial sequels the rest of Italy made for a quick dollar.

    Django 2: Il Grande Ritorno also known as Django Strikes Again has the benefit of being the only official sequel to Sergio Corbucci's 1966 Spaghetti Western Cult Classic and the star who created the role, Franco Nero. This proves to be the only benefit to Django Strikes Again in the end. Django Strikes Again lives up to the standards not of its predecessor, but of the more than 30 unofficial sequels that accompanied it to capitalise on Django's success. Its obvious why this one did not, because the only slight tribute it plays to its iconic character is giving him back his iconic weapon to use. What else it gives him is a mix of terrible lighting, poor visual quality and utterly extreme boredom stretched over a period of 90 minutes which proves to be painfully long. There is no plot worth following in Django Strikes Again as it is not western enough to be a western or entertaining enough to be entertaining. Its essentially a low-budget civil war drama featuring the iconic character Django and Franco Nero to portray him, yet the amount of screen time he actually gets is too minimal for the film to be called Django Strikes Back, when a significantly more appropriate title would be "Franco Nero Comes Back Once in a While". There just isn't fun in Django Strikes Again, not even being the slightest bit reminiscent of the cheap and derivative fun that came with the original Django as a rip off of A Fistful of Dollars. Director Nello Rossati not only makes Django Strikes Again a technical failure, but fails to capitalise on the fact that he has been presented with the opportunity to make the actual sequel to Django, and so I would never call it that. It is merely another unofficial sequel to Django which features a cameo by Franco Nero and is no better than all the other low-budget unofficial sequels the rest of Italy made for a quick dollar.

  • Jan 10, 2013

    Django 2: Il Grande Ritorno AKA Django Strikes Again, Is The First & Only Official Sequel To The 1966 Classic. Although This Does Not Live Up To The Original, It's Still Entertaining. Django Has Spent A Decade In A Monastery, Trying To Live Down His Violent Past. Slave Traders Are About To Witness Hell As They Kidnap His Daughter, And The Gunslinger Is Out For Revenge. Once He Digs Up His Old Gatling Gun, There Is No Stopping This Cult Western Figure. Franco Nero Reprises The Role He Made Famous In The 1966 Original, For The First Time. The Style Of This Movie Is More Like A Rambo III, Or Any Other Revenge Flick Of The 80's, Surprisingly This Works. It Works Because The Action Takes A Short While To Get Into Unlike The Original Showing That He Has Changed Slightly And Not Massacred Nearly All The Villains Men Near The Start Of The Movie.

    Django 2: Il Grande Ritorno AKA Django Strikes Again, Is The First & Only Official Sequel To The 1966 Classic. Although This Does Not Live Up To The Original, It's Still Entertaining. Django Has Spent A Decade In A Monastery, Trying To Live Down His Violent Past. Slave Traders Are About To Witness Hell As They Kidnap His Daughter, And The Gunslinger Is Out For Revenge. Once He Digs Up His Old Gatling Gun, There Is No Stopping This Cult Western Figure. Franco Nero Reprises The Role He Made Famous In The 1966 Original, For The First Time. The Style Of This Movie Is More Like A Rambo III, Or Any Other Revenge Flick Of The 80's, Surprisingly This Works. It Works Because The Action Takes A Short While To Get Into Unlike The Original Showing That He Has Changed Slightly And Not Massacred Nearly All The Villains Men Near The Start Of The Movie.

  • Mar 17, 2011

    Very unremarkable and left me totally under-whelmed. Wasnt a fan of the original anyways, but what i did enjoy from that was totally lacking in this. Got several more of these to watch - after this i feel its gonna be a chore.

    Very unremarkable and left me totally under-whelmed. Wasnt a fan of the original anyways, but what i did enjoy from that was totally lacking in this. Got several more of these to watch - after this i feel its gonna be a chore.

  • Jan 21, 2011

    Though there were a number of knock-off and unofficial sequels, this is the only official sequel to the classic original starring Franco Nero. Django has since sworn away violence and joined a monastery. But that doesn't last long as European mercenaries capture Django's daughter and force him to work in their silver mine. It's only a matter of time before Django digs up the old coffin to wreak havoc and demand satisfaction. And Donald Pleasence is in it briefly as a half-mad entomologist. This doesn't come close to touching the classic original, but it's really not a bad movie. It's also nowhere near as violent, and the setting wasn't nearly as creepy with hooded men running in the muddy streets of an abandoned town. It's probably unfair to compare as the original is one of the best of the spaghetti westerns ever made with a lot of iconic and influential moments. I will say that the villain is quite good, although his infatuation with butterflies as a plot point is pretty stupid. And it's good to see Nero back in the role that made him a star. Disappointed that they didn't reuse any of the original score, including Django's amazing theme song.

    Though there were a number of knock-off and unofficial sequels, this is the only official sequel to the classic original starring Franco Nero. Django has since sworn away violence and joined a monastery. But that doesn't last long as European mercenaries capture Django's daughter and force him to work in their silver mine. It's only a matter of time before Django digs up the old coffin to wreak havoc and demand satisfaction. And Donald Pleasence is in it briefly as a half-mad entomologist. This doesn't come close to touching the classic original, but it's really not a bad movie. It's also nowhere near as violent, and the setting wasn't nearly as creepy with hooded men running in the muddy streets of an abandoned town. It's probably unfair to compare as the original is one of the best of the spaghetti westerns ever made with a lot of iconic and influential moments. I will say that the villain is quite good, although his infatuation with butterflies as a plot point is pretty stupid. And it's good to see Nero back in the role that made him a star. Disappointed that they didn't reuse any of the original score, including Django's amazing theme song.

  • Aug 05, 2010

    After 30 unofficial sequels, Franco Nero finally got off his ass to finally give the fans an OFFICIAL sequel to his 1966 hit Django. The problem is he is over twenty years late! By the time Nero decided to do this sequel original director Sergio Corbucci was too ill to direct and the spaghetti western genre had been long since dead. Because of genre being dead and gone and for the fact Nero looks 20 years older, the filmmakers decided to, wrongly in my humble opinion, to make the storyline take twenty years after the events of Django which in turn makes this film take place after the western age. What! They decide to make an official sequel to Django and it ISN'T EVEN A WESTERN?! All I have to say is this is one of the biggest missed opportunities ever in a Euro Cult film genre. Ok so we have a plot that takes place 20 years after the events of Django and it is no longer the wild west. Django apparently has disavowed his violent ways, burying his machine gun, and has become a monk. That just makes me think of Rambo III and any connection to Rambo III cannot be good! News reaches Nero that a rebel Hungarian soldier (Christopher Connelly) has kidnapped his daughter to work in a bordello (he also kidnaps boys to work in his silver mines) so he decides to dig up his machine gun to go get her back. I forgot to mention that Donald Pleasance is in the film but his character is completely forgettable. Other than this NOT BEING A WESTERN, another problem is the complete tone shift from the first film. The original Django was a cheesy, trashy B-Western classic that took pride in being just that. New director Nello Rossati decides to take this film seriously and throws away all the cheesy and outrageous sequences of the original. I also didn't dig the new serious, reformed Django character with long slick backed hair. To be honest, even with Nero in the role, it just didn't feel like Django. Christopher Connelly is completely forgettable as our villain and director Rossati also overuses soft lenses, giving the film a white hue that was so prevalent in Italian films in the late 80's. Also... where the hell is the unforgettable Django song? Overall this has to be one of the most disappointing sequels I have ever seen. It by no means is a terrible film but it completely missed a grand opportunity to make a great sequel for the fans that had been patiently waiting over twenty years for Nero to return to the role who made him famous. Twenty years is a long time to wait and the fans were not dished up a sequel that was worth it. Sadly many of the unofficial sequels were actually better. See Django, Kill! and Django the Bastard to see what I mean. Hey those were WESTERNS so right away they have something up on Django Strikes Again. If it weren't' for the connection to the classic Django this would be just another forgettable late 80's Italian action film and with the Django character, it should have been a cult dream come true. Sadly it isn't and is only should only be seen as a curiosity piece for euro cult fanatics.

    After 30 unofficial sequels, Franco Nero finally got off his ass to finally give the fans an OFFICIAL sequel to his 1966 hit Django. The problem is he is over twenty years late! By the time Nero decided to do this sequel original director Sergio Corbucci was too ill to direct and the spaghetti western genre had been long since dead. Because of genre being dead and gone and for the fact Nero looks 20 years older, the filmmakers decided to, wrongly in my humble opinion, to make the storyline take twenty years after the events of Django which in turn makes this film take place after the western age. What! They decide to make an official sequel to Django and it ISN'T EVEN A WESTERN?! All I have to say is this is one of the biggest missed opportunities ever in a Euro Cult film genre. Ok so we have a plot that takes place 20 years after the events of Django and it is no longer the wild west. Django apparently has disavowed his violent ways, burying his machine gun, and has become a monk. That just makes me think of Rambo III and any connection to Rambo III cannot be good! News reaches Nero that a rebel Hungarian soldier (Christopher Connelly) has kidnapped his daughter to work in a bordello (he also kidnaps boys to work in his silver mines) so he decides to dig up his machine gun to go get her back. I forgot to mention that Donald Pleasance is in the film but his character is completely forgettable. Other than this NOT BEING A WESTERN, another problem is the complete tone shift from the first film. The original Django was a cheesy, trashy B-Western classic that took pride in being just that. New director Nello Rossati decides to take this film seriously and throws away all the cheesy and outrageous sequences of the original. I also didn't dig the new serious, reformed Django character with long slick backed hair. To be honest, even with Nero in the role, it just didn't feel like Django. Christopher Connelly is completely forgettable as our villain and director Rossati also overuses soft lenses, giving the film a white hue that was so prevalent in Italian films in the late 80's. Also... where the hell is the unforgettable Django song? Overall this has to be one of the most disappointing sequels I have ever seen. It by no means is a terrible film but it completely missed a grand opportunity to make a great sequel for the fans that had been patiently waiting over twenty years for Nero to return to the role who made him famous. Twenty years is a long time to wait and the fans were not dished up a sequel that was worth it. Sadly many of the unofficial sequels were actually better. See Django, Kill! and Django the Bastard to see what I mean. Hey those were WESTERNS so right away they have something up on Django Strikes Again. If it weren't' for the connection to the classic Django this would be just another forgettable late 80's Italian action film and with the Django character, it should have been a cult dream come true. Sadly it isn't and is only should only be seen as a curiosity piece for euro cult fanatics.

  • May 28, 2010

    Life is cheap and dirty in this sun baked spaghetti actioneer. Djanjo trys to help his people fight against the scurge of the "Devil" in the only true Djanjo sequel starring Franco Nero. Great score, ravishing women, and exploitative exotic quality fuel this high caliber bullet extravaganza.

    Life is cheap and dirty in this sun baked spaghetti actioneer. Djanjo trys to help his people fight against the scurge of the "Devil" in the only true Djanjo sequel starring Franco Nero. Great score, ravishing women, and exploitative exotic quality fuel this high caliber bullet extravaganza.

  • Dec 15, 2009

    Number one - Django 2 was made in 1987. Number two - only for REAL Django and SW fans. Number three - Franco Nero without Sergio Corbucci - weak selection.

    Number one - Django 2 was made in 1987. Number two - only for REAL Django and SW fans. Number three - Franco Nero without Sergio Corbucci - weak selection.

  • Sep 02, 2009

    Like what Krusty the Clown from The Simpsons said about that Russian cartoon that replaced Itchy and Scratchy in one episode, "What the hell was that?" Entertaining for a typical cheesy Italian film which becomes something like Rambo and Commando at the end.

    Like what Krusty the Clown from The Simpsons said about that Russian cartoon that replaced Itchy and Scratchy in one episode, "What the hell was that?" Entertaining for a typical cheesy Italian film which becomes something like Rambo and Commando at the end.

  • Cassandra M Super Reviewer
    Jan 10, 2009

    The only official (but certainly not the best) and up to now the latest sequel to Sergio Corbucci's 1966 masterpiece Django, "Django 2: Il Grande Ritorno" aka. Django Strikes Again, is definitely not worthy of the original, but it is still an entertaining Action/Spaghetti Western genre mix. Django, who calls himself "Brother Ignatius" now, has turned his back to violence and become a monk, living in a Mexican monastery, when a fatally ill former mistress tells him that he has a daughter and asks him to take care of the child after she's gone. The lady dies a short time later, and the daughter, along with other villagers, has been kidnapped by a ruthless gang of former Hungarian soldiers under the leadership of villainous Orlowski, a man who brutally enslaves Mexican civilians to drudge in a silver mine and forces women and little girls into prostitution, and is therefore referred to as "El Diablo" by the poor population. In order to rescue his daughter, "Brother Ignatius" has to return to his violent former ways and become "Django" again. The story is not very imaginative, and the locations are a little bit too tropical for a Western, even though the movie is set entirely in Mexico, but Franco Nero's performance makes up for the movie's weaknesses. Made in 1987, 21 years after the original, "Django Strikes Again" is a mixture of a Spaghetti Western and a typical eighties action movie. It is certainly fun to watch, but it's certainly not a masterpiece like the original. Django Strikes Again may be the only official sequel, but it's certainly not the best. I've seen "Django" sequels much better than this, but I've also seen much worse. 6 out of 10 stars because of Franco Nero, the one and only original Django, who saves the movie.

    The only official (but certainly not the best) and up to now the latest sequel to Sergio Corbucci's 1966 masterpiece Django, "Django 2: Il Grande Ritorno" aka. Django Strikes Again, is definitely not worthy of the original, but it is still an entertaining Action/Spaghetti Western genre mix. Django, who calls himself "Brother Ignatius" now, has turned his back to violence and become a monk, living in a Mexican monastery, when a fatally ill former mistress tells him that he has a daughter and asks him to take care of the child after she's gone. The lady dies a short time later, and the daughter, along with other villagers, has been kidnapped by a ruthless gang of former Hungarian soldiers under the leadership of villainous Orlowski, a man who brutally enslaves Mexican civilians to drudge in a silver mine and forces women and little girls into prostitution, and is therefore referred to as "El Diablo" by the poor population. In order to rescue his daughter, "Brother Ignatius" has to return to his violent former ways and become "Django" again. The story is not very imaginative, and the locations are a little bit too tropical for a Western, even though the movie is set entirely in Mexico, but Franco Nero's performance makes up for the movie's weaknesses. Made in 1987, 21 years after the original, "Django Strikes Again" is a mixture of a Spaghetti Western and a typical eighties action movie. It is certainly fun to watch, but it's certainly not a masterpiece like the original. Django Strikes Again may be the only official sequel, but it's certainly not the best. I've seen "Django" sequels much better than this, but I've also seen much worse. 6 out of 10 stars because of Franco Nero, the one and only original Django, who saves the movie.