Doctor X Reviews

  • Sep 10, 2018

    This colorized film is an amazing watch just for the visuals. A surprisingly good amount of effects is used and the pacing isn't too slow.

    This colorized film is an amazing watch just for the visuals. A surprisingly good amount of effects is used and the pacing isn't too slow.

  • Antonius B Super Reviewer
    Aug 21, 2017

    Oof. Not a good one, even for the camp value. The premise is interesting enough: a "Moon Killer" is on the loose, murdering and surgically cutting off portions of his victims. This leads police to Dr. Xavier and his assistants, all of whom become suspects, and the laboratories these men use have all the requisite special effects circa 1932. The biggest problem with the film is Lee Tracy, who plays a snooping newspaper reporter who clowns around, makes lame jokes, and repeatedly uses an asinine hand buzzer. The film is quite tedious to sit through, and several scenes seem elongated or 'filler' even for a total run time of 77 minutes. Another issue is that despite the use of darkness, shadows, and ominous faces, there really is no tension. The film is predictable and character motivations are absurd, so that even if you suspend disbelief and accept Dr. Xavier's theory about detecting the killer through an elaborate experiment measuring anatomical reaction, you still end up thinking, man, this is so stupid. At least I did anyway. I'm surprised others find it 'creepy' - even the slathering on of "synthetic flesh" does not produce a reaction of horror, as other great films in this genre will. Silly and annoying right up to that last scene at the end.

    Oof. Not a good one, even for the camp value. The premise is interesting enough: a "Moon Killer" is on the loose, murdering and surgically cutting off portions of his victims. This leads police to Dr. Xavier and his assistants, all of whom become suspects, and the laboratories these men use have all the requisite special effects circa 1932. The biggest problem with the film is Lee Tracy, who plays a snooping newspaper reporter who clowns around, makes lame jokes, and repeatedly uses an asinine hand buzzer. The film is quite tedious to sit through, and several scenes seem elongated or 'filler' even for a total run time of 77 minutes. Another issue is that despite the use of darkness, shadows, and ominous faces, there really is no tension. The film is predictable and character motivations are absurd, so that even if you suspend disbelief and accept Dr. Xavier's theory about detecting the killer through an elaborate experiment measuring anatomical reaction, you still end up thinking, man, this is so stupid. At least I did anyway. I'm surprised others find it 'creepy' - even the slathering on of "synthetic flesh" does not produce a reaction of horror, as other great films in this genre will. Silly and annoying right up to that last scene at the end.

  • Aug 07, 2017

    Surprisingly enjoyable and beautifully designed early Michael Curtiz comedy-thriller, full of baroque performances and expressionist lighting. Lionel Atwill occasionally seems to stumble over his lines, but that may be a reaction to the nonsense he has to spout. Whatever, for a movie made in 1932 it more than stands up today.

    Surprisingly enjoyable and beautifully designed early Michael Curtiz comedy-thriller, full of baroque performances and expressionist lighting. Lionel Atwill occasionally seems to stumble over his lines, but that may be a reaction to the nonsense he has to spout. Whatever, for a movie made in 1932 it more than stands up today.

  • Apr 24, 2016

    Such a good goddamn movie. One of the best old horror movies I've ever seen. Real snappy and eerie and strange and great. I love it.

    Such a good goddamn movie. One of the best old horror movies I've ever seen. Real snappy and eerie and strange and great. I love it.

  • Nov 10, 2014

    In an attempt to differentiate the new property from the horror films of other studios, the producers of the film made the decision to produce their creep-fest in the relatively new two-color Technicolor system and persuaded Natalie Kalmus, the color director at Technicolor, to work with them on developing a color scheme that would enhance the mysterious atmosphere they wished to create for the film. The entire look of the film is unforgettably odd. Doctor X is not the most frightening or memorable horror film to come out of the 1930s, but it is inventive in its early and idiosyncratic use of color and in its remarkable set design. A sequel was made a few years later starring a very uncomfortable-looking Humphrey Bogart, but it is now best forgotten.

    In an attempt to differentiate the new property from the horror films of other studios, the producers of the film made the decision to produce their creep-fest in the relatively new two-color Technicolor system and persuaded Natalie Kalmus, the color director at Technicolor, to work with them on developing a color scheme that would enhance the mysterious atmosphere they wished to create for the film. The entire look of the film is unforgettably odd. Doctor X is not the most frightening or memorable horror film to come out of the 1930s, but it is inventive in its early and idiosyncratic use of color and in its remarkable set design. A sequel was made a few years later starring a very uncomfortable-looking Humphrey Bogart, but it is now best forgotten.

  • Nov 08, 2014

    Pretty wild pre-code and early color film that features murder, bordellos, cannibalism, rape and other assorted nastiness that would remain unseen in films until the late 1960s. Michael Curtiz stylishly directed this film (more so than in his later big studio films) about a reporter's attempt to track down "The Moon Killer." The film features Lionel Atwill, Fay Wray and Lee Tracy. Not a classic, but a fun example of what films cold be like in the pre-code era of Hollywood.

    Pretty wild pre-code and early color film that features murder, bordellos, cannibalism, rape and other assorted nastiness that would remain unseen in films until the late 1960s. Michael Curtiz stylishly directed this film (more so than in his later big studio films) about a reporter's attempt to track down "The Moon Killer." The film features Lionel Atwill, Fay Wray and Lee Tracy. Not a classic, but a fun example of what films cold be like in the pre-code era of Hollywood.

  • Aug 12, 2013

    Super weird, super cool early 1930s colour sci-fi, horror, comedy. I'd love to see a nice clean print of this on the big screen.

    Super weird, super cool early 1930s colour sci-fi, horror, comedy. I'd love to see a nice clean print of this on the big screen.

  • Oct 25, 2012

    This is cannibalism A serial killer is on the loose and a local physician, Doctor Xavier, believes he can solve the mystery but he doesn't want his efforts getting out to the public. A local news reporter discovers the physician's involvement in the case and sneaks around his house trying to uncover clues. Will the killer take out the reporter and doctor before they can stop him? "I want to show you a new type of brain cell." Michael Curtiz, director of White Christmas, Casablanca, Mildred Pierce, The Adventures of Robin Hood, We're No Angels, The Vagabond King, and Yankee Doodle Dandee, delivers Doctor X. The storyline for this picture is very interesting and contains an element of who done it, comedy, and horror all mixed together. The script is fairly clever and the acting is very good. The cast includes Lionel Atwill, Fay Wray, Lee Tracy, and George Rosener. "What do you think about the incision at the base of the brain?" Doctor X is a movie I DVR'd off Turner Classic Movies (TCM) during a Lionel Atwill marathon. It seemed like a great movie for this holiday season and it lived up to my expectations. The make up at the end was awesome and the use of the cadavers was a fresh and innovative manner for a villain. I strongly recommend catching this movie at least once. "Synthetic flesh!" Grade: B

    This is cannibalism A serial killer is on the loose and a local physician, Doctor Xavier, believes he can solve the mystery but he doesn't want his efforts getting out to the public. A local news reporter discovers the physician's involvement in the case and sneaks around his house trying to uncover clues. Will the killer take out the reporter and doctor before they can stop him? "I want to show you a new type of brain cell." Michael Curtiz, director of White Christmas, Casablanca, Mildred Pierce, The Adventures of Robin Hood, We're No Angels, The Vagabond King, and Yankee Doodle Dandee, delivers Doctor X. The storyline for this picture is very interesting and contains an element of who done it, comedy, and horror all mixed together. The script is fairly clever and the acting is very good. The cast includes Lionel Atwill, Fay Wray, Lee Tracy, and George Rosener. "What do you think about the incision at the base of the brain?" Doctor X is a movie I DVR'd off Turner Classic Movies (TCM) during a Lionel Atwill marathon. It seemed like a great movie for this holiday season and it lived up to my expectations. The make up at the end was awesome and the use of the cadavers was a fresh and innovative manner for a villain. I strongly recommend catching this movie at least once. "Synthetic flesh!" Grade: B

  • Oct 04, 2012

    Not high grade horror, but a good spook fest none the less. Would have liked to see more of the make up effects through out the movie as a whole very much wasted in the short time they are used. The nice mix of spooky and mystery based with the that one comic relief and romantic formula that was expected of the time. The two strip color gives a nice touch to the lab equipment.

    Not high grade horror, but a good spook fest none the less. Would have liked to see more of the make up effects through out the movie as a whole very much wasted in the short time they are used. The nice mix of spooky and mystery based with the that one comic relief and romantic formula that was expected of the time. The two strip color gives a nice touch to the lab equipment.

  • Oct 04, 2012

    early 2 strip technicolor used

    early 2 strip technicolor used